Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Neville Furlong RIP

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    Neville Furlong RIP

    Terribly sad to hear of the passing of Neville Furlong. Condolences to all in Garryowen, his friends and most of all his family. RIP.

    #2
    RIP.
    Didn't he score a Try against the All Blacks with a broken leg?

    EDIT: Indeed he did see here
    Last edited by Piquet; 26th-September-2017, 13:35.

    Comment


      #3
      Originally posted by Piquet View Post
      RIP.
      Didn't he score a Try against the All Blacks with a broken leg?

      EDIT: Indeed he did see here
      The last 4 point try scored in international rugby if I'm not mistaken.

      Comment


        #4
        Been trying to find a video of that try...there doesn't seem to be any. Ireland were so battered that day that Furlong had to limp along the touch line with his foot all strapped up. I remember well when he managed to hop over the try line.

        Comment


          #5
          Originally posted by Haddock Thrower View Post
          The last 4 point try scored in international rugby if I'm not mistaken.
          Seems unlikely, they say in that article that NZ scored 59 points after his try.

          Comment


            #6
            Originally posted by Dougie View Post
            Seems unlikely, they say in that article that NZ scored 59 points after his try.
            The last Irish one !

            Comment


              #7
              Reading this bit

              'He famously limped over the line past New Zealand right wing John Kirwan after suffering an early injury.Furlong departed straight after but, legend has it, not before issuing the bemused World Cup-winning legend with a parting shot.'

              My memory which may be totally unreliable was that a load of Irish players were injured and to keep 15 on the pitch Furlong had to either stay on or come back on with is foot bandaged..and I mean bandaged over the boot not strapped around the ankle. Didn't think he departed earlier and I thought the game was pretty much over when he scored. I freely admit I could be totally wrong..anyone remember?

              Comment


                #8
                Originally posted by zeno View Post
                Reading this bit

                'He famously limped over the line past New Zealand right wing John Kirwan after suffering an early injury.Furlong departed straight after but, legend has it, not before issuing the bemused World Cup-winning legend with a parting shot.'

                My memory which may be totally unreliable was that a load of Irish players were injured and to keep 15 on the pitch Furlong had to either stay on or come back on with is foot bandaged..and I mean bandaged over the boot not strapped around the ankle. Didn't think he departed earlier and I thought the game was pretty much over when he scored. I freely admit I could be totally wrong..anyone remember?

                That coincides with my (vague) memory of things.

                EDIT Although according to here, it was 15-6 at Halftime so maybe not
                Last edited by Piquet; 26th-September-2017, 16:00.

                Comment


                  #9
                  Originally posted by Haddock Thrower View Post
                  The last Irish one !
                  Ah, fair enough.

                  Comment


                    #10
                    There is a video of it doing the rounds on Twitter today.
                    RIP
                    Con Artist

                    Comment


                      #11
                      I saw this article in today's Times, paper edition.

                      It didn't have a By-line so the bolded part led me to believe that Wummiskey had written it.

                      Not so. The on-line version is credited to John O'Sullivan

                      Share to Twitter
                      Share to Email App








                      Neville Furlong, who won two caps for Ireland during their 1992 tour to New Zealand has died at the age of 49 following an illness.
                      The former Wexford minor and under-21 footballer took up rugby when he went to University College Galway and went on to represent Garryowen, Connacht and Ireland A before being selected for the tour.
                      Neville Furlong pictured in 1992. Photograph: Alan Betson/Inpho He scored a try on his debut in the first Test against the All Blacks as Ireland almost shocked their hosts before losing 24-21 and lined out in the second Test despite carrying an injury. His try was Ireland’s last four-point effort as it was increased to five later that year.
                      A tall, strong wing Furlong served Garryowen with distinction as a player, helping them to an All-Ireland League title in 1995, coach and administrator.
                      Connacht chief executive Willie Ruane said: “On behalf of everyone in Connacht Rugby I would like to express my deepest condolences to the Furlong family on Neville’s sad passing.
                      “Neville represented the province in the 1990s and was capped twice for Ireland in the tour of New Zealand in 1992. The entire rugby community is in mourning following his untimely passing.”

                      Comment


                        #12
                        RIP
                        Gwan Joe!!

                        Comment


                          #13
                          Neville Furlong RIP

                          From the Irish Times today

                          Neville Furlong: True soldier on and off the pitch
                          LIAM TOLAND
                          Who was the last player to score a four-point try at international level? And what did he say to John Kirwan after touching down? As I cycled along the Wild Atlantic Way this September with Cross Cancer Research, deep in conversation with Zinzan Brooke, my mind drifted to New Zealand and Neville Furlong. Even Brooke hadn’t heard the immortal words echoed in Wellington on June 6th, 1992, with a final score 59-6. In recent times the world has lost two great Irish number eights and two cracking number 11s. Jona Lomu is simply the global legend of our game. But the other number 11, Neville Furlong, is the purest of pure legends; an ideal hero.

                          Yes, he was part RoboCop, but without the “roids”, as B-Company personnel in Hadath, Lebanon, will testify. Neville’s first of two trips to Lebanon was in 1993 with the 73rd Infantry Battalion where he fashioned a weightlifting bench press by stealing a metal bar and filling two buckets with concrete, combining his two loves – sunbathing and weightlifting – on the roof of B-Coy HQ.

                          Ireland’s first professional rugby player? In 1995 he was back with the 77th Infantry Battalion – but this time as Col Freddie Swords’s “love child”. His trips overlapped with the Israeli Operation Grapes of Wrath where the Irish witnessed countless atrocities, but it all started in 1993 with the Israeli Operation Accountability – which was somewhat prophetic, as accountability became Neville’s trademark.

                          For Neville was very special in the relentless simplicity he brought to all his success. Be it in the Castletroy Park Retirement Village where Antoinette, Pamela and his team battled the recession to ensure the future of so many vulnerable older adults by staying true to their wonderful vision. Or his various other ventures, culminating in the Kinlay Hostel on Eyre Square. He also had less successful investments such as the Rolex watch he purchased at the foot of the Acropolis of Athens, trading his digital watch and the last of his drachma.

                          Broken ankle
                          For many, Neville’s caps, heavily bandaged broken ankle and try against Kirwan, one of the greatest wingers of all time, define him, but for me it’s his time in the 3rd’s dressing room in his beloved Garryowen with team-mates Mikey “the Bake” Carmody, Dave “Gaggsy” Geoghan, Andy “Burger” Nevin, Johnny “Beds” Lane and team captain Brian “Dobbo” Dobson that tell the true story; they would do anything for the relentless Neville – even travel to New Brunswick RFC; anyone would. Because his greatest trait was spotting the weak guy where others would glance on by.

                          But Neville’s story is equally buried deep in Fontainebleau, 55km south of Paris where the great Irish-French Army rugby battles took place. With conscription, the French army team was an unofficial French U-23. The Irish army travel arrangements were legendary: due to cut backs, we would often arrive in Fontainebleau in worse shape than the Allies after landing in Normandy. As a cadet in the 68th Cadet Class I teamed up with Neville with the Irish Students and then the Defence Forces. The army didn’t have the same array of stars as the students so Neville would start the French game on his customary left wing but would soon be shifted in to 13, then to 12 and oft times to 10; that’s when they had the ball. And one by one the French flare would be cut in two by one of the purest tacklers I’ve ever seen.

                          As our Cross Cancer cycle continued along west Clare to Galway I noticed the 58th Cadet Class en masse deep in the peloton. Riding tallest was Rusty – Comdt John O’Callaghan (retired). We were due to visit Neville in the Galway Clinic but he’d transferred back home to Castleconnell. After 18 months Neville had beaten the tumour growing in his right leg and, true to character, he built a gym at home and bought a bike for his rehab. For me, grace under pressure was the hallmark of Neville with the arrival of the terrible news that he wasn’t going to tackle this cancer. The very bike Rusty was on was Neville’s rehab bike.

                          Convincing the top brass
                          Neville was my Mr Wolfe. In October 2004 I was given two options; go on the junior command and staff course or go to Kosovo. It says something about the Curragh Camp that I chose Kosovo, but October to April meant an entire season out of rugby; I was captain of Lansdowne FC and of the Defence Forces. As life in Kosovo rolled into the heavy winter months I was summoned into Lt Col Andy Kilfeather’s office. Neville somehow convinced the top brass that I should be granted two weeks’ special leave from Kosovo in the interest of Army rugby to play against the French. He got things done; in fact, in 49 years he got thousands of things done.

                          Above Neville’s computer at home hang four pictures: one of him facing the All Blacks in 1992; a photo of him, your correspondent, Ross O’Donnell and David Lavin after yet another massive defeat to the French in Paris, on the eve of Brian O’Driscoll’s hat trick. But the one taken in the Khayelitsha township of Cape Town is the most special: a band of brothers, we were all united, on tour and living life to the full; or, in his words, “It was beautiful as long as it lasted, the journey of my life.”

                          Many, many families will feel the deep loss of Neville, his family in Wexford, Wexford Wanderers rugby club, the 63rd Cadet Class, the 12th Infantry Battalion, UCG, Connacht, Ireland, but the ones that will feel his loss the most are us old Army rugby boys, Garryowen and, without doubt his beautiful wife Trish and sons Ódran and Kyle.

                          As Neville exited from the church on his final furlong on Thursday, his 12th Battalion rugby team-mate Sgt Ian Ryan – “Ryaner” – led the 12th Bn pallbearers with the music of Luka Bloom ringing out.

                          You were right, Neville: when you scored that four-point try against the All Blacks in 1992, on a broken ankle, Kirwan “couldn’t tackle a cripple”, as you said, but you’ve left a huge Band of Brothers behind that can tackle anything.

                          liamtoland@yahoo.com


                          Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

                          Comment


                            #14
                            Neville Furlong RIP

                            That article is well worth a read.
                            Last edited by The Last Stand; 29th-September-2017, 18:08.

                            Comment

                            Working...
                            X