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Crouch, Bind, Set! Joe Riddick will have to start all over again :)

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    #31
    Originally posted by Armin Tamzarian View Post
    As a matter of interest, can anyone remind me of the history of the the call:

    Crouch, touch, set
    Crouch, Touch, Pause, engage

    what else has there been?
    There was crouch and hold...engage
    "I can't say, I'm the referee, I'm not your coach" - Romain Poite

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      #32
      Oh and....

      Click image for larger version

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      :)
      "I can't say, I'm the referee, I'm not your coach" - Romain Poite

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        #33
        Click image for larger version

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        Please support Milford Hospice. Click here to donate.

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          #34
          No more scrum bingo on the terraces.:_crying__rvmp_by_ba

          At least it should make the game a much better viewing spectacle (and safer) for all concerned.
          The Beatings Will Continue Until Morale Improves

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            #35
            Originally posted by nuke View Post
            Just heard this and have to say i'm delighted - might even get another couple of seasons under my belt yet.

            A few old school props could find themselves back in 1st teams again.

            Cian Healy is talking through his not inconsiderable hole on this. The scrum is all about physics and by removing the majority of the hit it will have the opposite effect to what he think will happen. Technical props will flourish and the big hit merchants may well struggle.
            On the subject of Healy.


            Mike Ross replied to that Tweet of his saying something to the effect that . . .

            'If they removed the 90 degree rule it would solve all their problems.' ( just looked for the tweet and cant find it now )

            Can anyone enlighten me as to what he means?? Does my memory of it make sense?

            Body position?

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              #36
              Originally posted by Corcíoch View Post
              On the subject of Healy.


              Mike Ross replied to that Tweet of his saying something to the effect that . . .

              'If they removed the 90 degree rule it would solve all their problems.' ( just looked for the tweet and cant find it now )

              Can anyone enlighten me as to what he means?? Does my memory of it make sense?

              Body position?
              I think he's talking about when a scrum wheels 90 degrees.
              To The Brave and the Faithful, Nothing is Unpublishable.

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                #37
                Originally posted by joeriddick View Post
                I think he's talking about when a scrum wheels 90 degrees.
                That makes sense . . . .pffft, I hadn't a clue.

                ha ha.

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                  #38
                  Originally posted by Balla Boy View Post
                  Healy should be ok. He's strong as an ox, squat and low so should be able to bring his power to bear. It's the Sheridans of that will be sweating, I'd imagine.
                  As a former winger who has always been happy to remain ignorant of scrummaging I had to ask a prop about why Tony Buckley was having so much hassle at scrum-time. His summation was that Buckley was too big for propping and that his size meant that he found it harder to maintain balance during the crouch (he was prone to early engagements) and also there was a greater likelihood that he would have trouble during the hit. Therefore, am I right now in saying that the Buckley's of this world will find things easier?

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                    #39
                    Originally posted by Brenny View Post
                    As a former winger who has always been happy to remain ignorant of scrummaging I had to ask a prop about why Tony Buckley was having so much hassle at scrum-time. His summation was that Buckley was too big for propping and that his size meant that he found it harder to maintain balance during the crouch (he was prone to early engagements) and also there was a greater likelihood that he would have trouble during the hit. Therefore, am I right now in saying that the Buckley's of this world will find things easier?
                    Others might disagree with me but I think Buckley may come to prominence with these rules. He's had an awful problem staying low on the engagement, which has cost him the hit on too many occasions. With the hit being depowered, I think his freaky upper body strength might have more time to come into play, thus making him more effective.
                    To The Brave and the Faithful, Nothing is Unpublishable.

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                      #40
                      I can't see it being good for Buckley. The big hit was a gift to massive props who could boss their opposite number without ever really having to worry about the technicalities, as long as the engage was quick and the ball came out fast.

                      Buckley should have thrived, but didn't. Was he too big? Perhaps. But only an inch taller than Hayman. I always suspected that he was too wide if anything. Couldn't see how the unit could bind with him in it.

                      He's plenty strong, but he's now going to have to stop loose heads getting into him without the aid of the bang to put manners on them.

                      I'd imagine that a good technical loosehead will punish a big man even more under these rules. Tightheads will revert to the Dan Cole/Adam Jones mould - 6/6.2, and the same width from their neck to their arse.
                      "We will not walk in fear, one of another. We will not be driven into an age of unreason if we dig deep into our history and remember we are not descended from fearful men" Edward R Murrow

                      "Little by little, we have been brought into the present condition in which we are able neither to tolerate the evils from which we suffer, nor the remedies we need to cure them." - Livy


                      "I think that progress has been made by two flames that have always been burning in the human heart. The flame of anger against injustice and the flame of hope that you can build a better world" - Tony Benn

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                        #41
                        "Crouch, Bind, Set "

                        Not sure if this is on the forum. This is coming into effect from preseason.

                        New process. Crouch Bind Set.

                        Scrums must be stable , square and parallel to touchline.

                        Scrumhalf will place the ball into the scrum when told to by the referee.

                        http://www.irb.com/newsmedia/mediazo...d=2066642.html


                        The International Rugby Board Council has announced the implementation of a global trial of the “crouch, bind, set” scrum engagement sequence, which is aimed at enhancing player welfare by reducing impact on engagement by up to 25 per cent in elite competition.

                        Approval of the sequence on player welfare grounds, is coupled with a call for Game-wide commitment from law-makers, match officials, coaches and players to ensure a fair and positive attitude is applied to deal with scrum issues facing the elite level of the Game.

                        Implementation will begin at the start of the next season in both hemispheres and follows extensive evaluation of the sequence during the recent IRB Pacific Rugby Cup, which indicated the possible delivery of a more stable platform leading to fewer resets and more successful scrums.

                        In a revision of the 'crouch, touch, set' engagement sequence currently being trialled, props will be expected to bind using their outside arm after the referee has called "bind" in the sequence.

                        The front rows will maintain the bind until the referee calls “set”. At that point, the two packs will engage.
                        The process was overseen and recommended to IRB Council by the specialist IRB Scrum Steering Group (featuring Union scrum experts) as a potential enhancement to the scrum mechanics after an extensive process of testing and analysis at all levels of the Game within the unprecedented IRB funded Scrum Forces Project run by the University of Bath in conjunction with the RFU.

                        Referees will be stricter

                        IRB Chairman Bernard Lapasset said: “The scrum is a fundamental and dynamic part of our Game. It is important that we continue to promote the best possible player welfare standards and this trial process is about putting players first and delivering a reduction of the forces on engagement at elite level, which could have significant positive effects on long-term player welfare.”

                        “The global implementation of this trial is a forward step, which will be subject to continual monitoring and evaluation. I would like to thank all Unions for their support and enthusiasm throughout this process.”

                        Coupled with the process, the IRB will instruct referees to ensure that the ball does not enter the tunnel unless the scrum is square and stationary and that a straight throw-in is strictly policed.

                        Lapasset added: “The implementation of the revised sequence alone is not about overcoming all the challenges of the elite scrum but it is a forward step. There is a collective responsibility for coaches, players and administrators to make the scrum a positive, fair and, above all, safe contest. Match officials will be stricter when refereeing the existing law.”

                        International Rugby Players’ Association Executive Director Rob Nichol said “It is our hope that through this trial, players and officials are able to implement the new sequence in a manner that maintains the scrum as a contest and central feature of the Game, delivers on improved short and long-term player safety and welfare objectives and goes some way towards eliminating the frustrations associated with resets. We appreciate the work undertaken by all involved to get the project to this stage.”

                        Positive move to improve the scrum

                        Scrum expert and Wales’ head coach for the upcoming tour to Japan, Robin McBryde, said: “We welcome the positive move to tackle the scrum, as it plays a significant part in the game, and must be preserved as a safe and fair contest. We look forward to getting to grips with the new sequence and playing our part in addressing the issues for a successful outcome.”

                        Chairman of the IRB Match Officials Selection Panel and Interim Chairman of the IRB Rugby Committee John Jeffrey said: “There is a collective responsibility to ensure the scrums are improved at elite level. Everyone must play their part and the referees are very much part of the solution.”

                        In collaboration with Member Unions and key stakeholders, a Game-wide educational process featuring coach and match official workshops will be rolled out ahead of the trial.

                        The five perspective Law changes currently being trialled and the trial change to television match official protocols will be considered by IRB Council at its annual meeting in 2014. This new scrum engagement trial will be before Council at its interim meeting the same year. As such, any amendments that are approved will be in place a year ahead of Rugby World Cup 2015.

                        As part of the new engagement sequence, the referee will call ‘crouch’ and then ‘bind’. The front rows crouch and using their outside arm each prop must bind. A loosehead prop must bind on the opposing tighthead prop by placing the left arm inside the right arm of the tighthead and gripping the tighthead prop’s jersey on the back or side. A tighthead prop must bind on the opposing loosehead prop by placing the right arm outside the left upper arm of the opposing loosehead prop and gripping the loosehead prop’s jersey with the right hand only on the back or side.

                        'Crouch, bind, set' will be the call

                        The props must not grip the opponent’s chest, arm, sleeve or collar. Following a pause, the referee will then call ‘set’ when the front rows are ready. The front rows may then engage. The “set” call is not a command but an indication that the front rows may come together when ready. The sanction for any infringement will be a free kick.

                        A crouched position is the extension of the normal stance by bending the knees sufficiently to move into the engagement without a charge. A front row must not form at a distance from its opponents and rush against them or pull them. The sanction for ‘charging’ will be a penalty kick.

                        The 25 per cent reduction of compression forces is based on peak compression forces under the current sequence averaging 16,500 newtons for elite men’s packs and 8,700 newtons for women’s international packs.

                        The research was based on two phases of examination under the University of Bath Scrum Forces Project: Phase one included six levels of the Game from international to under-18 with six teams at each level and six different engagement processes. The packs scrummaged with an instrumented scrum machine which measured the forces on engagement and the secondary shove post-engagement.

                        Phase two was live scrummaging with players in both front rows wearing pads which measured the forces on engagement. The results from the elite teams showed that, averaged across all teams, the 'crouch, bind, set' condition generated lower peak forces during the engagement phase, demonstrating a 25 per cent reduction compared with the ‘crouch, touch, set’ or ‘crouch, touch, pause, engage’ sequence.

                        The Scrum Steering Group comprises: David Barnes (IRPA), Mike Cron (NZRU), Didier Retière (FFR), Brian O'Shea (ARU), Norm Mottram (USA Rugby), Richie Dixon (GRU), Ken Quarrie (NZRU), Graham Mourie (IRB Rugby Committee member), John Jeffrey (IRB Council Member, SRU and Chairman of IRB Rugby Committee), Gavin Williams (RFU), Dr Martin Raftery (IRB Chief Medical Officer), Joël Jutge (IRB High Performance Match Official Manager).

                        The group is supported by Dr Grant Trewartha, Dr Mike England and Dr Keith Stokes, members of the University of Bath research team.

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                          #42
                          They will make a dogs ballacks of this again. I give it two weeks before the refs again start ignoring crooked put ins because its the quickest way for them to let the scrum be over
                          My computer thinks I'm gay
                          What's the difference anyway
                          When all the people do all day
                          Is stare into a phone

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                            #43
                            Anything that reduces the number of resets is a good thing.

                            Educate the refs as to where the 4 arms should be binding, and enforce it.
                            I am the million man.

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                              #44
                              They are already supposed to know, I wouldnt assume you see any change especially considering the ref can only see one side and the touchjudges never call for technical scrum offences
                              My computer thinks I'm gay
                              What's the difference anyway
                              When all the people do all day
                              Is stare into a phone

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                                #45
                                The goon with the stick on the blindside must now get involved with the scrummage. The instructions about the bind are clear and the Assistant Referee or Touch Judge or whatever they are these days should stop whisper sweet nothings to the TMO over their radio and support the referee in the officiating at the scrum.

                                This might actually work. I won't dare dream that the straight feed will happen, but by attempting to de-power the hit we might get a more subtle prop, who can actually scrummage rather than the bang bang merchants of the front row these days.

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