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"The Blind Side" vs. The Tighthead

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    "The Blind Side" vs. The Tighthead

    "The Blind Side" is a book about two things: (i) the development of the left tackle position in American football from being just another grunt in the 1980’s to the second highest paid position in the sport today and (ii) Mike Oher's journey from being a giant homeless kid to playing in the NFL. There are some interesting parallels to be drawn between left tackle and tighthead prop, and, although our Mike comes from Fermoy rather than the mean streets of Memphis, between Mike Oher and Mike Ross.

    It’s January 2003. UCD are playing Cork Con at Belfield in an All Ireland League Division 1 match . UCD's tighthead is 24 years old, 6'2 and an undersized 16 and a half stone. Con’s number three is 23 years old, 6'2 and carrying a soft 21 stone. The UCD prop hit a lot of rucks, made a few carries, made his tackles, looked a bit shaky in the scrum. The Con prop only occasionally broke into an, awkward looking, trot. He didn't make it to many rucks and didn't touch the ball. Most of the 500 spectators wouldn't have thought much of either player but, if pushed, might have ventured that the UCD player looked the better prospect. Of course, most of the spectators wouldn't have noticed that the Con prop didn't take a backwards step in a scrum that match, or that season (or the season before, or the season after). Match report: http://tribune.maithu.com/article/20...-con-a-lesson/


    I was the UCD tighthead and after another year and a half of mediocrity, I packed in rugby with two herniated discs in my neck (two less than Phil Vickery apparently, we now share neck doctors). The Con tighthead developed into one of the best tightheads in Europe and the bedrock of Leinster's retention of the Heineken Cup. It was his injury in the first scrum at Twickenham in March, and eventual withdrawal after 35 minutes, which led to Ireland's humiliation. More accurately, it was Ireland's failure to adequately replace Mike Ross that caused their downfall. Tighthead prop might be the most important position in rugby. If your tighthead retreats a foot on your own ball, your out-half will have their openside in his face. If your tighthead goes back more than that, as we saw at Twickenham, its turnovers, penalties and, every prop's worst nightmare, the penalty try. I still wake up with cold sweats about one particular match in which I was destroyed, our scrum-half's taunts still ring in my ears - "Beep, beep - vehicle reversing!".

    Tighthead is not only the most important position on the pitch, it’s also the most demanding to play. Tom Court is a great athlete. He is 6'3, 19 stone and a monster in the weights room. But he's not a tighthead. So what makes a good tighthead? To answer this question, we should be taking a leaf out of another Michael Lewis book, Moneyball, and focussing only on the most important attributes. It’s easy to be distracted by statistics such as how quickly a prop or baseball player can run 30 yards or how much he can bench press. Billy Beane’s Damascene moment was realising that the only really important statistic for baseball hitters was how often they got on base. Similarly, tight head props should be analysed first and foremost by their ability in the scrum. But how do you identify and develop young players who can become world-class scrummagers?

    Left tackle has a lot of parallels with tighthead prop. It’s a key position as he protects the quarterback's vulnerable blindside. If your left tackle gets beaten, your quarterback (your key asset) gets hospitalised. It’s also the hardest position in football to play as a left tackle needs to be strong enough to stand toe to toe to a bull-rush from a 24 stone defensive tackle but quick enough to drop back and pick up a blitzing linebacker. The ideal left tackle is 6'5 plus, 22 stone plus and has great agility, long arms, flexible hips, good balance and an explosive burst. That's a very small sub-section of the human race. Mike Oher meets those criteria and, when he first met a scout in 2004, Oher was immediately marked down as a first round NFL draft left tackle. This was notwithstanding the fact that Oher had just started playing football, couldn't make his High School team and had never even played left tackle.

    The arrival of Lawrence Taylor and speed rushers in the 1980’s NFL drove up the value of left tackles who could protect quarterbacks from this new threat. Starting NFL left tackles now earn an average of $4m per season, almost twice as much as the other linemen (football’s equivalent of the front-row). In fact, it’s the second highest paid position in football ($1m p.a. behind quarterback). Its simple economics: importance of asset + scarcity of supply = inflated price. As the importance of tighthead has become more and more apparent, the same economic principles have served to drive up their value. Rugby salaries are light years away from the NFL but, with Toulon paying Carl Hayman a reported £550,000 per year to sit on their bench, people have started to take notice. Tighthead props are paid a premium and quality tightheads are now some of the highest paid players in world rugby.

    Lets return to the key question, how do we recognise and develop the young rugby players who can become international quality tightheads? Mike Ross was 26 before Harlequins spotted his potential, how was it missed in Ireland? Why did he end up plying his trade against jokers like me up until then? What attributes should the game be looking for? It’s not possible to accurately judge based on the scrummaging ability of young props as restricted scrums and differing rates of physical development can hide a lot at underage level. As with Mike Oher, it’s the potential for greatness, not the current performance level, that should be looked at. But rugby does not benefit from an NFL quality scouting system and good tightheads seem to come in all shapes and sizes. How do you reconcile Adam Jones and Carl Hayman? They used to say that you couldn't play tighthead with a long back but Hayman, Martin Castrogiovanni, Dan Cole and many of the other top current tightheads are 6'2 or more. Tightheads do have to be able to scrummage low, but big guys can get down there provided they are flexible in the hips and strong in the lower back. "Loose hips" is a key scouting evaluation for NFL linemen. Cobus Visagie, one of the best scrummaging tightheads of recent years, has a theory that the ideal tighthead has slim shoulders and a barrel chest. Of course, even if sports scientists are able to assist in identifying a physical ideal, there are still no guarantees. Mike Oher hasn’t made it as a left tackle in the NFL and has had to move to the less well paid right side.

    Rugby needs to get more scientific in the way it evaluates and develops young props. And it’s here that Irish rugby has a structural disadvantage. English club academies take teenagers and focus on their individual long-term development as rugby players. Irish schools take teenagers and focus on winning schools cups. For example, the most promising young tighthead in Irish rugby, Adam Macklin, captained Methody to Ulster Schools Cup success in 2008 as a distinctly prop shaped number 8. Promising young athletes with the right attributes need to be motivated to play in the front row through underage rugby rather than allowed to rampage about from the back row. Coaches need to be motivated to look to those players’ long-term prospects rather than wanting to get the ball in their hands at number 8. Economics will probably have a role to play in encouraging more big young athletes with flexible hips, narrow shoulders and barrel chests to focus on tighthead prop and the contracts they could earn as professionals. And, perhaps most importantly, we need to convince enough Irish mothers to allow their sons into the front row notwithstanding the almost inevitable herniated discs and cauliflower ears that will follow.
    Last edited by extighthead; 24-May-2012, 17:04.
    https://twitter.com/ianlynam

    #2
    Really enjoyable article & you would hope the IRFU are implementing some plan to find the TH props of the future. Good to see a Fermoy man propping up the Irish team.

    Comment


      #3
      This is one of the most enlightening
      post I've ever read on here.

      Are herniated discs really 'almost inevitable'?

      I don't know how most mums are. But mine was happy for me to
      play rugby because she figured I'd 'meet the right people'..
      But my dad has a love for neck strength! and front row scrummaging, and I'm sure
      if i'd a had the size, I would have found favour with trying it out.

      btw extighthead: you have a future as a writer. Great storytelling to open with.
      I hope you post some more hereabouts.
      Last edited by mtcmolloy; 24-May-2012, 17:09.

      Comment


        #4
        oh and your maithu link there is broken

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          #5
          Originally posted by mtcmolloy View Post
          ................

          Are herniated discs really 'almost inevitable'? ...................
          Cauliflower ears are absolutely unecessary but some see them as a badge of honour. More of a second rower thing because of water, sweat and sometimes piss on your ears between those legs............

          Comment


            #6
            I'm sitting here in DC reading this and I've been watching a bit of "football" while I'm here. Anyway I'm sure it has been mentioned here before but has the American college system been looked at for prospective props? There are some savage athletes over here and they won't all make the NFL draft. Some of those lads could (potentially) make it as a top level prop. The risk from an irish point of view is small. Bring em over at say 21/22 give them a 1 year training/development contract and see how the fare. Plenty of big units here and a surprising amount of them have Irish connections and might be willing to give it a shot.

            Just a thought.
            "If we hit that bullseye, the rest of the dominoes will fall like a house of cards - checkmate!" Zapp Brannigan

            Comment


              #7
              Originally posted by masterchief View Post
              I'm sitting here in DC reading this and I've been watching a bit of "football" while I'm here. Anyway I'm sure it has been mentioned here before but has the American college system been looked at for prospective props? There are some savage athletes over here and they won't all make the NFL draft. Some of those lads could (potentially) make it as a top level prop. The risk from an irish point of view is small. Bring em over at say 21/22 give them a 1 year training/development contract and see how the fare. Plenty of big units here and a surprising amount of them have Irish connections and might be willing to give it a shot.

              Just a thought.
              Not really, I think even 21/22 would be old. John Hayes got to a stage where he could survive against 90%+ of opposing props, but as we have seen, there aren't too many out there who can make that late a switch successfully. I think when ex-tighthead talks of "young", he probably means young teenager.

              With regards to the excellent article, EVENTUALLY, when the provinces get their act together, change will happen. In the long term, I believe that there won't be a kid playing any sport, who hasn't been judged with a view to playing rugby. We are still at the early stage of youth recruitment, where rotten politics dictates who is selected for development squads and representative teams, and of course we have the schools/clubs apartheid still going on. I believe we will get there eventually, and young players who are tall but stocky at 10 or 11, are encouraged to go into the front row.

              Comment


                #8
                Brilliant post extighthead.

                Comment


                  #9
                  Originally posted by Point View Post
                  Not really, I think even 21/22 would be old. John Hayes got to a stage where he could survive against 90%+ of opposing props, but as we have seen, there aren't too many out there who can make that late a switch successfully. I think when ex-tighthead talks of "young", he probably means young teenager.
                  Hmm interesting. I wonder would it be worth doing some sort of trawl of lads in their late teens out here for prop potential? High school level maybe. There's a huge untapped potential talent pool here.
                  "If we hit that bullseye, the rest of the dominoes will fall like a house of cards - checkmate!" Zapp Brannigan

                  Comment


                    #10
                    I thought i read somewhere that the Italian scrum guru Cittia or something like that ,Scotland & Warriors scrum coach has been appointed on a development role for young props by IRFU .

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Excellent article, very well written. I have often wondered if some of the players that were too short for secondrows and too slow for backrows, couldn't have been converted.

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                        #12
                        The best post on this site in 2012. Possibly in the last few years.

                        Outstanding stuff sir.

                        It would be great if you could post your views on the Munster scrum ....
                        Please support Milford Hospice. Click here to donate.

                        Comment


                          #13
                          I have a number of friends who played AIL with Ross. They say he was not focused then and cannot believe he how successful he is now. The oft heard quotes (from fellow Leinster players) about him being a glutton for scrum technique is something he must have picked up at Harlequins.

                          This view was obviously shared by Munster management at the time and the reason he was overlooked.

                          Comment


                            #14
                            Amazing coincidence...Mrs. 16 was watching a film on the hard drive last night. I asked what it was and she said "Blind Side. It's about an American football kid. Didn't think you'd be interested 'cause it has Sandra Bullock in it." I'll suffer her for the story....
                            Last edited by No. 16; 25-May-2012, 07:10.

                            Comment


                              #15
                              Outstanding read
                              "They think they know us, but they haven't a clue"

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