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    O’Gara Interview (S’Indo)


    'I'm in the best nick I've been'</font>



    Sunday January 28th 2007</font>




    WE'RE in the dungeon of the Killiney Castle Hotel and Ronan O'Gara
    looks like he is on the rack. Twitching and fidgeting, having gone over
    some ground that was uncomfortable, at last he settles on terrain that
    appeals to him. Is he one of those creatures that needs to create
    pressure for himself in order to perform? Hmmm, not so sure. </font>


    Some creative minds need chaos in the background before they can function. O'Gara's life though is ordered and structured. </font>



    He plans his weeks meticulously, figuring out whether he needs to
    devote extra time to personal work in the gym, or the pool, on the
    track or in front of the computer. Then he gets on with it, knowing
    where he is going each step of the way. For match days though he seems
    to need something different. </font>



    In an interview with the Guardian last October, O'Gara was forthcoming
    on a range of topics about rugby in these islands, the effect of which
    was to shine a hot, white light on Munster as they went to Welford Road
    for the first leg of their Heineken Cup tie with Leicester. </font>


    Had the roles been reversed it was something Munster would have played up into a grievous slight on their manhood. </font>



    "Yeah, it's interesting - I'm not too sure because, when you look at
    that Leicester game, I did put pressure on myself that day, and I
    delivered. Once in a while maybe, but I don't think 'under pressure' is
    the way to live. I f***ing won't make that mistake again!" </font>



    He is about to go into another cauldron. The Millennium Stadium
    generates more noise than any other rugby ground in the world. Wales
    are feeling good about themselves again and, after last weekend,
    suddenly everybody is feeling good about playing Ireland. This has a
    lot to do with the fact that the bulk of the Irish pack got a good
    seeing-to in the Thomond Park send-off. </font>



    There was a critical moment in which O'Gara was a key decision-maker.
    It was that scrum, where between himself and Paul O'Connell they
    decided to pass on three points in favour of chasing seven. His
    contribution was to pack down again because Leicetser's blind side
    defensive alignment was screaming to be attacked. All he needed was the
    ball. </font>


    He was trying to look unexcited about the prospect when the second scrum was buckled and penalised. </font>


    "We looked like fools, but the one thing you expected was to win that scrum. You can't account for that, can you?" he asks. </font>



    Well, the way the Munster scrum was going that day maybe you can.
    Anyway, it's gone now. And, if Ronan O'Gara ever gets a crick in his
    neck it won't be from looking over his shoulder. </font>



    You have to remind him of the relative novice, sitting in the bar of a
    Sydney hotel in 2001. Back then, had you shown him a snapshot of the
    2007 version of the same man he

    #2





    Hmmm, no question about how Harry Ellis ran over him in TPlast Saturday - wonder why?
    New infraction avoidance policy: a post may be described as imbecilic, but its author should never be described as an imbecile.

    Comment


      #3
      Originally posted by Old Dog





      Hmmm, no question about how Harry Ellis ran over him in TPlast Saturday - wonder why?


      ....or handing off a 6' 8" lock last April[img]smileys/wink.gif[/img]


      Seriously though,O'Gara has developed intoa world classplayer, most consistent outhalf in Northern Hemisphere.There was a time when his big match temperament was questionable, definitely not anymore.
      they call it \'passion\', we call it pride

      Comment


        #4
        He's definitely stronger and faster this season. He's made a few clean breaks and his tackling is much more reliable. He also doesn't get chucked around in contact the way he used to. If he can keep developing his strength and speed he hasafew really good years in him.

        Comment


          #5
          His tackling was pretty poor in the last game in T.P.



          Harry Ellis (opposition scrum half) bounced him ffs! [img]smileys/shock.gif[/img]


          Comment


            #6
            at this stage his strength isnt going to get a whole lot better.at this stage hes pretty much as strong as hes going to get.hes been a pro rugby playerfor the bones of 10 years,any stregth gains he makes at this stage will be tiny percentages.they say after 3 years of consistent top class strength training,and good nutrition,you're roughly as strong as your going to get,its all ting fractions after that
            g\'wan bruff!!

            ``The answer is not heavy- handed regulations that crush the entrepreneurial spirit and risk- taking of American capitalism. That\'s what\'s made our economy great.\"
            -Barack Obama


            \"The first lesson of economics is scarcity: There is never enough of anything to satisfy all those who want it. The first lesson of politics is to disregard the first lesson of economics\"
            -thomas sowell

            Comment


              #7


              Don't know who "they" are Bruffian but it's not as clear cut as that. It very much depends on the individual.


              As he says himself, he's only recently started to makedecent gains in what he can lift. Also, men typically reach the peak of their physical strength in their early 30s, not in their 20s. Being bounced off by Harry Ellis aside (and I'd say that had more to do with his awful body position than anything) he's definitely looked bigger and stronger to me this season.

              Comment


                #8
                Originally posted by Munsterboy


                Don't know who "they" are Bruffian but it's not as clear cut as that. It very much depends on the individual.


                As he says himself, he's only recently started to makedecent gains in what he can lift. Also, men typically reach the peak of their physical strength in their early 30s, not in their 20s. Being bounced off by Harry Ellis aside (and I'd say that had more to do with his awful body position than anything) he's definitely looked bigger and stronger to me this season.


                I'd agree. Don't know if he was underperforming before, but I think he's been a different player the last 12 months or so.


                He seemed to come back from the Lions tour with a new impetus - and maybe we need to give Carney's camps some credit as well.
                "We will not walk in fear, one of another. We will not be driven into an age of unreason if we dig deep into our history and remember we are not descended from fearful men" Edward R Murrow

                "Little by little, we have been brought into the present condition in which we are able neither to tolerate the evils from which we suffer, nor the remedies we need to cure them." - Livy


                "I think that progress has been made by two flames that have always been burning in the human heart. The flame of anger against injustice and the flame of hope that you can build a better world" - Tony Benn

                Comment


                  #9

                  Originally posted by Munsterboy

                  Don't know who "they" are Bruffian but it's not as clear cut as that. It very much depends on the individual.


                  @@@@SPAN style="font-weight: bold;">As he says himself, he's only recently started to makedecent gains in what he can lift.@@@@/SPAN> Also, men typically reach the peak of their physical strength in their early 30s, not in their 20s. Being bounced off by Harry Ellis aside (and I'd say that had more to do with his awful body position than anything) he's definitely looked bigger and stronger to me this season.
                  Which begs the question, what's he been doing up to now?
                  Grandpa Simpson: The last time the meteors came, we thought the sky was on fire. Naturally, we blamed the Irish. We hanged more \'n a few.

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Originally posted by Munsterboy


                    Don't know who "they" are Bruffian but it's not as clear cut as that. It very much depends on the individual.


                    As he says himself, he's only recently started to makedecent gains in what he can lift. Also, men typically reach the peak of their physical strength in their early 30s, not in their 20s. Being bounced off by Harry Ellis aside (and I'd say that had more to do with his awful body position than anything) he's definitely looked bigger and stronger to me this season.


                    no,he said hes finally lifting big weights this season.in other words it took his this long to finally start lifting big weights.i havent noticed any difference in size this season.hes tackling isnt any better than it used to be,ellis wasnt the first to bounce him.his place kicking has been phenomenal,but other than that no difference.


                    "they would be most strength and conditioning coached" if you're training with a pro rugby set up,since you're about 18,you're basically as big as you're going to get by the time you're 23.darragh hurley and tim ryan for example aren't going to get noticably stronger and bigger from now on. tomas o leary would be the same in the backs


                    you make the the vast majority of your strength gains in the first couple of years of proper training.thats why you're seeing teenage guys competing these days,after a couple of years of pro training.
                    g\'wan bruff!!

                    ``The answer is not heavy- handed regulations that crush the entrepreneurial spirit and risk- taking of American capitalism. That\'s what\'s made our economy great.\"
                    -Barack Obama


                    \"The first lesson of economics is scarcity: There is never enough of anything to satisfy all those who want it. The first lesson of politics is to disregard the first lesson of economics\"
                    -thomas sowell

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Originally posted by bruffian
                      Originally posted by Munsterboy


                      Don't know who "they" are Bruffian but it's not as clear cut as that. It very much depends on the individual.


                      As he says himself, he's only recently started to makedecent gains in what he can lift. Also, men typically reach the peak of their physical strength in their early 30s, not in their 20s. Being bounced off by Harry Ellis aside (and I'd say that had more to do with his awful body position than anything) he's definitely looked bigger and stronger to me this season.


                      no,he said hes finally lifting big weights this season.in other words it took his this long to finally start lifting big weights.i havent noticed any difference in size this season.hes tackling isnt any better than it used to be,ellis wasnt the first to bounce him.his place kicking has been phenomenal,but other than that no difference.


                      "they would be most strength and conditioning coached" if you're training with a pro rugby set up,since you're about 18,you're basically as big as you're going to get by the time you're 23.darragh hurley and tim ryan for example aren't going to get noticably stronger and bigger from now on. tomas o leary would be the same in the backs


                      you make the the vast majority of your strength gains in the first couple of years of proper training.thats why you're seeing teenage guys competing these days,after a couple of years of pro training.


                      So either he's lying about feeling stronger, or he just wasn't arsed for the first few years yes?


                      Johnny O'Connor packed iton when he went to Wasps.


                      And when Eddie O Sullivan set targets of the squad adding however many kilos per man on the return from South Africa he wasn't plucking numbers out of the air.


                      Niall O'Donovan stated clearly last year that Hayes and Horan had worked on their upper body strenght, and that it had taken a year to get up to the level to be able to lift jumpers with one man rather than two.


                      O'Driscoll is markedly heavier than when he made his international breakthrough.


                      Boxers frequently move up weight divisions over the course of their career.


                      The game would seem to be replete with players who gain marked improvements in size and or strength through training at different points in their career.
                      "We will not walk in fear, one of another. We will not be driven into an age of unreason if we dig deep into our history and remember we are not descended from fearful men" Edward R Murrow

                      "Little by little, we have been brought into the present condition in which we are able neither to tolerate the evils from which we suffer, nor the remedies we need to cure them." - Livy


                      "I think that progress has been made by two flames that have always been burning in the human heart. The flame of anger against injustice and the flame of hope that you can build a better world" - Tony Benn

                      Comment


                        #12
                        Originally posted by Balla Boy
                        Originally posted by bruffian
                        Originally posted by Munsterboy


                        Don't know who "they" are Bruffian but it's not as clear cut as that. It very much depends on the individual.


                        As he says himself, he's only recently started to makedecent gains in what he can lift. Also, men typically reach the peak of their physical strength in their early 30s, not in their 20s. Being bounced off by Harry Ellis aside (and I'd say that had more to do with his awful body position than anything) he's definitely looked bigger and stronger to me this season.


                        no,he said hes finally lifting big weights this season.in other words it took his this long to finally start lifting big weights.i havent noticed any difference in size this season.hes tackling isnt any better than it used to be,ellis wasnt the first to bounce him.his place kicking has been phenomenal,but other than that no difference.


                        "they would be most strength and conditioning coached" if you're training with a pro rugby set up,since you're about 18,you're basically as big as you're going to get by the time you're 23.darragh hurley and tim ryan for example aren't going to get noticably stronger and bigger from now on. tomas o leary would be the same in the backs


                        you make the the vast majority of your strength gains in the first couple of years of proper training.thats why you're seeing teenage guys competing these days,after a couple of years of pro training.


                        So either he's lying about feeling stronger, or he just wasn't arsed for the first few years yes?


                        Johnny O'Connor packed iton when he went to Wasps.


                        And when Eddie O Sullivan set targets of the squad adding however many kilos per man on the return from South Africa he wasn't plucking numbers out of the air.


                        Niall O'Donovan stated clearly last year that Hayes and Horan had worked on their upper body strenght, and that it had taken a year to get up to the level to be able to lift jumpers with one man rather than two.


                        O'Driscoll is markedly heavier than when he made his international breakthrough.


                        Boxers frequently move up weight divisions over the course of their career.


                        The game would seem to be replete with players who gain marked improvements in size and or strength through training at different points in their career.


                        no,like he said himself in the article,hes what is referred to as a "slow gainer"someone who physically finds it hard to put on strength and mass.some fellahs can hit the gym eat a bit more and put on a stone in a month,other would take a year to do that.so what i was saying was that it has taken him this long to start lifting big weights,because it didnt come easy for him.


                        o connor was quite young when he went to wasps,after being a pro for only a year or so.so its not surprising he was still able to put on mass.hes still a small backrow mind


                        if o gara never lifted weights he'd probably be walking around at about 11 stone,hes not genetically a big strong man,so it takes him a long time to make the same gains of other people,who are naturally stronger.


                        o driscoll came onto the scene at 18,of course hes bigger now,he probably never lifted a weight before he got called up to the irish panel.he hasnt changed muchphysically in the last 3 years.


                        boxing is different since people,are constantly cutting weight to amke a division,and also you only need to put on 3-4 pounds to move up a division in some boxing diviosions.


                        people will put on a bit of weight naturally as they get older,but we are talking about pounds.in the modern era,guys are working out like pros from the age of about 17-18,and by the time they are in their early 20s they've done 90% of the work,after that its basically maintenanace.
                        g\'wan bruff!!

                        ``The answer is not heavy- handed regulations that crush the entrepreneurial spirit and risk- taking of American capitalism. That\'s what\'s made our economy great.\"
                        -Barack Obama


                        \"The first lesson of economics is scarcity: There is never enough of anything to satisfy all those who want it. The first lesson of politics is to disregard the first lesson of economics\"
                        -thomas sowell

                        Comment


                          #13
                          Bruffian I'm going to have to disagree with you, look at powerlifting and body building guys constantly pack on mass and increase strength for years. It just takes times. Olympic lifting would be the same but weight classes mess it up.
                          Kiva - Loans That Change Lives

                          Comment


                            #14


                            The more weight training you do the stronger you will get. Guys don't just stop getting stronger after 5 years of proper weight training. Granted the first few months/year gains are at their biggest but gains will always be made.


                            "darragh hurley and tim ryan for example aren't going to get noticably stronger and bigger from now on"


                            If Hurley for example is currently maxing at about 150Kgon a bench press(reasonable asumption for a prop) he might only increase his One Rep Max by another 10 kilos over the rest of his career.


                            HOWEVER


                            His 2 RM, 4RM, 6RM, 8RM will increase with time to the point where when he was 22 and maxing out at 150 for one rep he can now do 6/8/10 reps close to that weight thus developing the varying types of muscle fibres fast twtich slow twitch etc etc.

                            Comment


                              #15





                              Makes sense, Bruffian. You'd suspect that O'Gara, slow gainer or not, must have taken a step up in the last couple of years if its taken him this long to reach peak.


                              I also got the impression that the Irish forwards had gained a fair bit in catching up.


                              I can see completely how a guy will hit his peak on a certain regime within a couple of years. I'd just got the impression that improved nutrition and regimes are constantly moving the notion of what is possible outward, and hence someguys are getting consistently heavier.


                              Is the relationship between strength and weight as simple as I'd normally assume? Can people improve strength/power without putting on pounds?
                              "We will not walk in fear, one of another. We will not be driven into an age of unreason if we dig deep into our history and remember we are not descended from fearful men" Edward R Murrow

                              "Little by little, we have been brought into the present condition in which we are able neither to tolerate the evils from which we suffer, nor the remedies we need to cure them." - Livy


                              "I think that progress has been made by two flames that have always been burning in the human heart. The flame of anger against injustice and the flame of hope that you can build a better world" - Tony Benn

                              Comment

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