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Trial law on tackle height for 18/19 season in England

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    Trial law on tackle height for 18/19 season in England

    New law being trialed with player safety in mind
    Excellence is hard to keep quite - Sherrie Coale

    #2
    Details announced by the RFU see the definition of a high tackle lowered from above the line of the shoulders to above the armpit line.

    Being trialled in the Championship Cup, which replaces the B&I Cup. Greene King Championship sides taking part.

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      #3
      Not sure this trial is that necessary
      also does it need a new thread. surely just the laws thread would do for this topic?

      Comment


        #4
        I think it's a good move. Should reduce the number of "riding up" tackles that are basically headbutts.

        It will be interesting to see the effect it has on tackling technique. Tacklers will have to pick their spot.
        "We will not walk in fear, one of another. We will not be driven into an age of unreason if we dig deep into our history and remember we are not descended from fearful men" Edward R Murrow

        "Little by little, we have been brought into the present condition in which we are able neither to tolerate the evils from which we suffer, nor the remedies we need to cure them." - Livy


        "I think that progress has been made by two flames that have always been burning in the human heart. The flame of anger against injustice and the flame of hope that you can build a better world" - Tony Benn

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          #5
          I'm glad to see it, but I wonder how it'll be policed when someone ducks into a tackle.
          Tis but a scratch.

          Comment


            #6
            Thought it worth resurrecting one of these threads, particularly in light of the red cards being handed out in RWC games for tackles to the head/neck, with this article from today's Guardian.

            France facing up to clamour for rugby to change after spate of tragedies

            Andy Bull

            At first glance they could be any French family: a father and his 17-year-old son sitting together in their living room watching the Rugby World Cup on television. So far their favourite match has been Japan’s gripping win over Ireland, not least for the Brave Blossoms’ esprit de corps and positivity. If Philippe Chauvin’s middle son, Nicolas, had still been alive they felt he would have loved it, too.

            It is almost 10 months now since Nicolas, aged 18, died while playing for Stade Français Espoirs against their counterparts from Bordeaux-Bègles. Rugby was his passion from the moment he first picked up a ball at his local club just east of Paris in 2005. Tragically, the young flanker’s choice of sport cost him his life.

            A double tackle fractured a cervical vertebra and he subsequently suffered a heart attack and brain damage. He underwent emergency surgery but died three days later.

            Not everyone, in the wake of such a grievous loss, would have the emotional resilience to tune into this World Cup. Philippe Chauvin, however, is a remarkable – and increasingly driven – man. Having played rugby himself for 25 years, he wants Nicolas’s death to galvanise the game’s authorities, in France and worldwide. At the end of last month he announced his intention to launch a manslaughter lawsuit aimed at uncovering the full facts behind his son’s death.

            Chauvin, who works for the French national rail company SNCF, feels he owes it to Nicolas to check out every available avenue. Under French law, with the police investigation now closed, he is not allowed access to the file relating to his son’s death unless he goes down the legal route. “Losing a child is terrible, even more so because of a problem that could have been avoided. I’m going ahead with this complaint because I do not want it to happen to others.

            “I feel it is also my duty to Nicolas to do everything so that the facts and responsibilities are established. By filing a complaint, I will have access to the file. There may be things that I do not know or positions that are not the ones I was told.”

            Philippe Chauvin speaks at the Paris Descartes University. Photograph: D Opoczynski/D Opoczynski/Maxppp/PA Images
            He would like to establish whether the French Rugby Federation or anyone else involved on the day was negligent in any way. “A federation has an obligation to ensure the safety of its practitioners. I do not believe that a shoulder shot to the head launched at 20 km/h preserves safety. I just want someone to explain to me why the security of a player could not be assured and if and where mistakes were made.”

            Calm and measured, Chauvin could just be the catalyst for significant change, with four young players having died in French rugby between May 2018 and January this year. The upper age limit for players representing the Espoirs has already been reduced by a year to 22, aiming to reduce the ‘men against boys’ element when young junior-club hopefuls like Nicolas start colliding with intensively conditioned professionals. Below-the-waist-only tackles and a ban on double tackles are being tried out at junior level, albeit with mixed initial results.

            The Chauvin family, though, believe it is people’s attitudes that most need recalibrating. “Rugby is not a game of destruction, we must not play to wipe out an opponent. The spirit of the game is to keep the ball alive, not to kill your opposite number.”
            While Philippe instinctively remains a rugby man – “I used to watch the games with Nicolas. It’s part of our life. I do not wish to attack rugby” – he does not want other parents to suffer as he and his wife have done.

            In particular, he argues the sport cannot continue to permit the type of fierce upper-body shot that fractured Nicolas’s second vertebra – an injury more consistent with car crash victims. “We must stop looking for excuses when an offence is committed. Rugby is a beautiful sport in terms of its values and shared commitment but if the game is not controlled and safety is not assured, young people will go to another sport. It should not be a sport for bullies or brutes but a sport of possibilities, in which teams have to combine strength, speed, agility, intelligence and will.”

            The past 10 months have also shown him and his two other rugby-playing sons – the eldest is 20 – that not everyone takes full responsibility for their actions. “I have discovered that some within the sport are not prepared to face the reality of fatal accidents. I was very surprised given it is a professional sport. In business a fatal accident is the responsibility of the employer and investigations are conducted to establish the circumstances. The facts are examined against clear safety rules. I feel more apprehension for the players now and am much less tolerant of reckless play. I now know it can be fatal, that there is no second chance if the limits are crossed.”

            There are few things more affecting than a grieving parent’s cry from the heart. Philippe Chauvin is looking forward to France’s game against England on Saturday but his dearest wish is that Nicolas’s story resonates far beyond this World Cup. “I don’t want him to leave a legacy, he just deserves the people of rugby to be aware of the truth.” The entire rugby world should heed his powerful message.

            Tis but a scratch.

            Comment


              #7
              Originally posted by mr chips View Post
              I'm glad to see it, but I wonder how it'll be policed when someone ducks into a tackle.
              I hate to be devil's advocate but with the application of the new 'no high' hits laws, meriting either a yellow or red card, surely there is a big incentive for sides to get hit high?
              e.g. i just wonder will some players dip into tackles to deliberately get hit near their head to try to get opposition players automatically carded?!?
              ____________________________________________
              Munster were great when they were Munster.

              alas they are just north munster now.......
              ____________________________________________

              Comment


                #8
                Originally posted by Daithi View Post

                I hate to be devil's advocate but with the application of the new 'no high' hits laws, meriting either a yellow or red card, surely there is a big incentive for sides to get hit high?
                e.g. i just wonder will some players dip into tackles to deliberately get hit near their head to try to get opposition players automatically carded?!?
                Is that something you would coach into one of your teams Daithi??
                Only fools and drunks argue over everything. If you don’t have a hangover the next day you’re not the drunk...

                Comment


                  #9
                  Originally posted by Oldschoolsocks View Post
                  Is that something you would coach into one of your teams Daithi??
                  Absolutely not. But then when I did coach, I didn't coach players to run at the referee in the defensive line like international players do, or to tip tackle & then not to tip tackle like international pros do, or to wind down the clock thru endless scrums when 3 points ahead like the pros do, etc, etc, etc And despite not encouraging them to try these tactics at all , nonetheless some players did use them...

                  My main point is if there is an advantage to be garnered by gaming the interpretation of a rugby law the pros will more than likely do it imho , and sooner rather than later too!!

                  p.s. for example a pro player of Luke McGrath's height would now be highly cognizant of the likelihood of an opposition player hiting them high & hence getting a card.
                  Last edited by Daithi; 18th-October-2019, 09:35.
                  ____________________________________________
                  Munster were great when they were Munster.

                  alas they are just north munster now.......
                  ____________________________________________

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Originally posted by Daithi View Post

                    Absolutely not. But then when I did coach, I didn't coach players to run at the referee in the defensive line like international players do, or to tip tackle & then not to tip tackle like international pros do, or to wind down the clock thru endless scrums when 3 points ahead like the pros do, etc, etc, etc And despite not encouraging them to try these tactics at all , nonetheless some players did use them...

                    My main point is if there is an advantage to be garnered by gaming the interpretation of a rugby law the pros will more than likely do it imho , and sooner rather than later too!!

                    p.s. for example a pro player of Luke McGrath's height would now be highly cognizant of the likelihood of an opposition player hiting them high & hence getting a card.
                    Yeah,
                    I would have been shocked if you had said yes tbh. To butcher Hanlon:

                    “Never attribute to malice that which is adequately explained by accident .”
                    Only fools and drunks argue over everything. If you don’t have a hangover the next day you’re not the drunk...

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Originally posted by Oldschoolsocks View Post

                      Yeah,
                      I would have been shocked if you had said yes tbh. To butcher Hanlon:

                      “Never attribute to malice that which is adequately explained by accident .”
                      Very eloquent quote, but you must have been dying to use it when it's so out of context!?

                      The way I always explained marginal things happening on the pitch was & is:
                      ' certain players get to learn the dark arts themselves...'
                      ____________________________________________
                      Munster were great when they were Munster.

                      alas they are just north munster now.......
                      ____________________________________________

                      Comment


                        #12
                        Originally posted by Daithi View Post

                        Very eloquent quote, but you must have been dying to use it when it's so out of context!?

                        The way I always explained marginal things happening on the pitch was & is:
                        ' certain players get to learn the dark arts themselves...'
                        Hold on a moment,

                        in this case the dark art is deliberately sustaining a concussion by getting a hit full force in the head by someone else’s shoulder?

                        That’s a one deeply stupid dark art right there.
                        Only fools and drunks argue over everything. If you don’t have a hangover the next day you’re not the drunk...

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