A word from our sponsors

Collapse

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Lessons from Aotearoa..a template to break the line more often

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    Lessons from Aotearoa..a template to break the line more often



    ​​​​​​https://rugbycology.blogspot.com/202...-to-break.html



    Some very interesting reading here on the links between passing, width and line breaks.


    Left me trying to remember how many times I've seen Ireland or Munster thread three passes together without contact in the recent past...
    "We will not walk in fear, one of another. We will not be driven into an age of unreason if we dig deep into our history and remember we are not descended from fearful men" Edward R Murrow

    "Little by little, we have been brought into the present condition in which we are able neither to tolerate the evils from which we suffer, nor the remedies we need to cure them." - Livy


    "I think that progress has been made by two flames that have always been burning in the human heart. The flame of anger against injustice and the flame of hope that you can build a better world" - Tony Benn

    #2


    There's a bit of headscratching for me on the correlation/causation piece in the stats. Do we get line breaks because we go to the fourth pair of hands, or do we stretch to the third pass because we can see the break is on?

    Is the conversion rate evidence of effectiveness or good decision making?

    "We will not walk in fear, one of another. We will not be driven into an age of unreason if we dig deep into our history and remember we are not descended from fearful men" Edward R Murrow

    "Little by little, we have been brought into the present condition in which we are able neither to tolerate the evils from which we suffer, nor the remedies we need to cure them." - Livy


    "I think that progress has been made by two flames that have always been burning in the human heart. The flame of anger against injustice and the flame of hope that you can build a better world" - Tony Benn

    Comment


      #3
      Originally posted by Balla Boy View Post

      There's a bit of headscratching for me on the correlation/causation piece in the stats. Do we get line breaks because we go to the fourth pair of hands, or do we stretch to the third pass because we can see the break is on?

      Is the conversion rate evidence of effectiveness or good decision making?
      This is a really insightful and well-researched article, but I'm inclined to agree about the relationship between the number of passes and line-breaks being a little bit confusing. I get that they don't want to over-complicate the article with tonnes of stats, so it could be interesting to see the correlation between the line breaks after X hands and the number of "hammer carries" in the build up phases, in follow-up articles. The Munster/Ireland study will be interesting, but I think there’s a fair chance that the percentage of line breaks after 4 pairs of hands will be pretty similar, because although the Irish provinces tend to go wide less from early phases, as you've highlighted, decision-making and skill level of players also play a part, and you’d imagine the average New Zealander player’s skill level is a few levels above the average Irish player’s skill level and decision-making. For that reason, comparisons probably make the most sense when done on one team or teams of similar skill levels.

      Another interesting follow up article could be to discuss the relationship between the number of carries that involve 4-passes and the subsequent effectiveness or meters gained of “hammer carries”. I’ve long been of the belief that needing “to earn the right to go down the middle” is as important as needing “to earn the right to go wide”. I think we saw England approach the New Zealand RWC match with this mindset. They probably believed they had the edge on New Zealand’s forwards, in the same way Ireland probably thought they had, but unlike Ireland, England earned the right to go down through the middle of New Zealand’s defence, by providing a constant threat to New Zealand out the back — through pull-back passes from forwards right on the gain line. This meant that New Zealand could never really commit more than 2/3 defenders to the collision area and that the New Zealand line speed couldn’t be as quick as it had been against Ireland.


      Comment


        #4
        Originally posted by Balla Boy View Post
        a hint to all the would be readers of this blog... the stupid moving graphics are not adverts but are ridiculous statistic animations...
        I of course immediately ignored them for my first readiing of the page....

        He was as lame as a duck. Not the metaphorical lame duck either, but a real duck that was actually lame. Maybe from stepping on a land mine or something.

        Comment


          #5
          I will say from watching all the saturday morning games that the skill levels in passing the ball, were off the charts. These lads can fire with bullet like speed and accuracy off both sides, so their willingness to do that is instinctive.
          Honestly watching some of the long passes at speed was incredible viewing.

          I remember Joe Schmidt saying, when he first came to Leinster, that he wanted them to be the best passing team in Europe. And it worked after a few first few game jitters.
          He was as lame as a duck. Not the metaphorical lame duck either, but a real duck that was actually lame. Maybe from stepping on a land mine or something.

          Comment

          Working...
          X