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    The Athletics Thread



    kahalui suggested that we get a general athletics thread going to discuss various happenings in the world of Track & Field, so here it is.


    Gillick running in Crystal Palace on friday. Lets hope for a good run to wipe away the cobwebs from Barcelona.
    Footballers spend 90 minutes pretending they are injured, Rugby players spent 80 minutes pretending they aren\'t.

    #2
    Good idea to have this thread. I enjoy watching Athletics when I can. No 400m tonight at Crystal Palace though. I wonder is it on tomorrow and is Gillick still running.

    No Irish in action tonight but some good events to watch. Tyson Gay was brilliant in the 100m running it in 9.78 seconds into a 0.4 headwind. Turenish Dibaba in the 5000m was class. Eased her way around and then just unleashed her speed to pull away in the last 200m or so. Allyson Felix untouchable in the 200m.

    Bernard Lagat, despite being 35 now, won the 5000m when he showed he still has a bit of the pace he used to have to outsprint the rest.

    These were the highlights for me.

    Looks like a lot of the athletes who performed well in the European Championships found it difficult to be at their best tonight although in some cases I guess it was just because they were up against much better opponents.

    04072511, can</span> you please tell me if Lagat ever beat the mighty El Guerrouj. I remember Ngeny beating him in a big race, maybe the World Championship, but I can't remember if Lagat ever did. I used to love watching El Guerrouj running with his incredibly easy style.

    Comment


      #3


      Originally posted by Benny
      Good idea to have this thread. I enjoy watching Athletics when I can. No 400m tonight at Crystal Palace though. I wonder is it on tomorrow and is Gillick still running.

      No Irish in action tonight but some good events to watch. Tyson Gay was brilliant in the 100m running it in 9.78 seconds into a 0.4 headwind. Turenish Dibaba in the 5000m was class. Eased her way around and then just unleashed her speed to pull away in the last 200m or so. Allyson Felix untouchable in the 200m.

      Bernard Lagat, despite being 35 now, won the 5000m when he showed he still has a bit of the pace he used to have to outsprint the rest.

      These were the highlights for me.

      Looks like a lot of the athletes who performed well in the European Championships found it difficult to be at their best tonight although in some cases I guess it was just because they were up against much better opponents.

      04072511, can you please tell me if Lagat ever beat the mighty El Guerrouj. I remember Ngeny beating him in a big race, maybe the World Championship, but I can't remember if Lagat ever did. I used to love watching El Guerrouj running with his incredibly easy style.

      Ah that was just the big championship come down for the Europeans. It is to be expected. Blanka Vlasic was fantastic as ever though.


      I dont think Lagat ever beat him in a championship race. Ngeny beat him in the Sydney Olympics but besides that I cant remember him losing a championship 1500m (well besides Atlanta when he fell).


      Gilly and The Hesh run tomorrow.
      Footballers spend 90 minutes pretending they are injured, Rugby players spent 80 minutes pretending they aren\'t.

      Comment


        #4
        http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OqyJB...eature=related

        Stumbled across this. Susan Smith in the studio with Bill, Treacy and Coghlan in 1997 after coming 7th in the World Championships.

        She seems very forgotten now, but she was the start of the sprinting boom in Ireland. Before her we had no world class athletes over short distances (400m or lower). You could say she broke down the barriers and showed that Irish people could be successful at sprint events, and well look where we are now.

        Such a shame she never kicked on from 1997. Had a good season in 1998 setting her current NR, but burned herself out in the semi final of the Euro's and had nothing left for the final.

        Dont think she was fully fit in Sydney and she retired after that.

        P.S. Its funny how little Bill O'Herlihy knows about athletics. Her time was about 54.50 at the time of this interview and he asks her "to win gold in sydney how much time do you have to take off your current time? 3 seconds?". Smith replies "a second and a half".

        Good man Bill, 3 seconds off her time would have been 1 full second inside the WR at that time and still a good 7 tenths inside the current record. [img]smileys/redface.gif[/img]
        Footballers spend 90 minutes pretending they are injured, Rugby players spent 80 minutes pretending they aren\'t.

        Comment


          #5

          Originally posted by 04072511
          Ah that was just the big championship come down for the Europeans. It is to be expected. Blanka Vlasic was fantastic as ever though.


          I dont think Lagat ever beat him in a championship race. Ngeny beat him in the Sydney Olympics but besides that I cant remember him losing a championship 1500m (well besides Atlanta when he fell).


          Gilly and The Hesh run tomorrow.
          Thanks. That's what I thought re Lagat.

          Yeah I think you are right about the come down and yes I forgot about Vlasic. She's in a league of her own in the high jump.

          Nice one. I'll watch that tomorrow. Hopefully both can put up decent performances, especially Gillick who would have expected more of himself, I think, at the Euros.


          Comment


            #6
            Oh yes Susan Smith. I had forgotten all about her but looking at that video I remember watching the races at the time and being very excited about her getting to that final.

            Indeed I have to agree with you about Bill. He hasn't a clue really about anything. You'd think he'd at least make some kind of effort to know something about the sport he is presenting. Amateur stuff from him unlike Susan who as you say set the ball rolling for Irish sprinting.

            He's very annoying when he asks a question as well as you hear him in the background going "yeah yeah" while the person is answering, It's like as if he hasn't time for their answer as it stops him asking his next dumb question.

            The other thing of note in this video is the legend that is Eamon Coghlan unusually was kept pretty quiet.[img]smileys/smile.gif[/img]

            Comment


              #7


              Gilly came 5th in Crystal Palace yesterday. Slow time, in the high 45's but at least he beat Borlee and Rooney who both beat him in Barcelona so at least that is something anyway. He was in lane 8 so it was always going to be difficult. Not the greatest run to be honest though.


              Hesh in Lane 1, never stood a chance from there. Came 7th in 20.7ish.


              Footballers spend 90 minutes pretending they are injured, Rugby players spent 80 minutes pretending they aren\'t.

              Comment


                #8


                Derval came 7th (out of 9) tonight at the Weltklasse in Zurich in 13.00, not a great run, but understandable in her first race since the highs of Barcelona.


                Gillick had his slowest run of the season running just over 46 seconds and finishing 8th.
                Footballers spend 90 minutes pretending they are injured, Rugby players spent 80 minutes pretending they aren\'t.

                Comment


                  #9


                  WOW! Just WOW!


                  http://www.rte.ie/sport/athletics/20.../rudishad.html
                  <H1>Rudisha breaks men's 800m world record</H1>





                  Kenyan David Rudisha broke the men's 800 metres world record that had stood for 13 years on Sunday, clocking a time of one minute 41.09 seconds at the ISTAF athletics meeting in the German capital.



                  Rudisha snatched the world record from Denmark's Wilson Kipketer, who set a mark of 1.41.11 in 1997 in Cologne, Germany.



                  Rudisha set the world record at one of athletics' most iconic venues, the deep blue track of Berlin's Olympic stadium, site of last year's world athletics championships.

                  <DIV id=story_island></DIV>


                  'This was my first real attempt to break the world record. I knew I was good, I had trained very hard,' Rudisha told reporters.



                  'Now that I have run that time, I can say I have the ability to improve and go faster.'



                  Rudisha said the world record made up for his surprise semi-final exit at the same stadium at the world championships last year.



                  'This was the best way to make it right again here,' he said.



                  The 21-year-old Kenyan retained the African Championships title over the distance last month in the fastest time ever run in his athletics-mad country, proving he was a force to be reckoned with this season.



                  He is the son of Daniel Rudisha, a member of the 4x400m Olympics silver-winning relay team in Mexico City in 1968.



                  The Berlin meeting is not part of the top tier Diamond League season.



                  'Now I want to finish top in the Diamond League in my event,' said Rudisha, who leads the 800m standings in the 14-meeting season.
                  Footballers spend 90 minutes pretending they are injured, Rugby players spent 80 minutes pretending they aren\'t.

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Originally posted by 04072511


                    Derval came 7th (out of 9) tonight at the Weltklasse in Zurich in 13.00, not a great run, but understandable in her first race since the highs of Barcelona.


                    Derval's report on it:-


                    http://dervalorourke.blogspot.com/20...-meet-in-world -but-ran-like-fat-cow.html





                    New infraction avoidance policy: a post may be described as imbecilic, but its author should never be described as an imbecile.

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Not a good run from Derval, finishing 7th (of 9) in 12.96

                      Gillick was supposed to run, he must have pulled out very late on.

                      Steph Twell ran a cracking PB of 14:54 over 5000m. Delighted for her. She seems like such a nice person. Its impossible not to like her.

                      Oh and the BBC commentry team were referring to the winning time of 14:34 for 5k as not very quick!! WTF!
                      Footballers spend 90 minutes pretending they are injured, Rugby players spent 80 minutes pretending they aren\'t.

                      Comment


                        #12
                        Derval representing Europe today at the IAAF Continental Cup (Formerly World Cup) in Split. Only the 5th Irish person ever to be selected to represent Europe. On at 5pm Irish time I think.
                        Footballers spend 90 minutes pretending they are injured, Rugby players spent 80 minutes pretending they aren\'t.

                        Comment


                          #13
                          Has anyone read this book? Is it worth getting? Zatopek is
                          someone I'd love to know more about.

                          The Irish Times - Saturday, February 19, 2011
                          The obsessiveness of the long-distance runner

                          EILEEN BATTERSBY

                          FICTION: Running By Jean Echenoz Translated by Linda
                          Coverdale (The New Press, 126pp. £12.57)

                          IMMORTALITY IS a strange concept. Why are some men
                          remembered while so many others are forgotten? A hero
                          defies many things, even death. In ancient times a hero
                          was usually a warrior, proven in battle. But valour yielded
                          to prowess, and the modern era has tended to settle on a
                          different type of immortal: the champion athlete who has
                          faced all barriers, physical pain and hardship, only to
                          triumph. The great Czech distance runner Emil Zátopek
                          was one such hero. Born into poverty he went to work in a
                          shoe factory where, although the smell of rubber was
                          overpowering, he never complained.

                          Quiet and polite, Zátopek was a good-natured lad, eager to
                          please, always curious. He didn’t want to take part in the
                          cross-country race organised for factory workers, because
                          he didn’t like running. But he did compete, and finished
                          second. The experience made him think, and the rest is
                          history, wonderful and moving and desperately sad.

                          French writer Jean Echenoz is a proven original possessed
                          of an extraordinary lightness of touch, which he shapes into
                          sharp, playful, always perceptive narratives. Winner of the
                          Prix Goncourt for I’m Off (also known as I’m Gone) in
                          1999, his other novels include the frenzied comedy
                          Cherokee (1987), Piano (2004) and Ravel (2007), which
                          was shortlisted for the 2009 International Impac Dublin
                          Literary Award. In Ravel, Echenoz took the facts of the final
                          decade of the French composer’s life and created a
                          remarkable portrait of an artistic consciousness.

                          With Zátopek, Echenoz has gone further, and looks at the
                          way a passive individual evolved into an Olympian and one
                          of the enduring giants of track and field. Zátopek did
                          honour to his country, yet his success would eventually
                          irritate the authorities. In Running , his rise is exciting, his
                          exploitation by the political propagandists infuriating, his
                          decline, culminating in his collapse in Melbourne in 1956,
                          moving beyond words.

                          The facts appear simple: Zátopek dominated distance
                          running, set world records over nine distances and was the
                          first man to run under 29 minutes for 10,000 metres. He
                          won the 10,000 metres at the London Olympics in 1948 and
                          also took the silver in the 5,000 metres.

                          Four years later, at the Helsinki Olympics, Zátopek, of the
                          agonised running style, became an invincible force and
                          achieved the seemingly impossible. Not only did he win the
                          5,000 metres and the 10,000 metres, he also took the gold
                          medal in the marathon in his debut at the distance. Even
                          now, despite all the other champions who have come and
                          gone in the intervening years, Emil Zátopek is still hailed as
                          a god, and rightly so.

                          He was poor, by nature quiet, and lived under the thumb of
                          communism at its most oppressive. He was used by his
                          political masters, who continually interfered with his career
                          and controlled the invitations he received to compete
                          abroad. They tried to make his victories seem less about
                          him than about the system. Echenoz, writing in a jaunty,
                          continuous present tense – his barbed, deadpan tone
                          cleverly rendered in English by the always intuitive Linda
                          Coverdale – uses the facts and writes about athletics with
                          sufficient competence to satisfy readers with a specialist
                          interest without alienating the general reader.

                          An athlete, particularly a distance
                          It is useless to attempt to reason a man out of a thing he was never reasoned into.

                          Every plan I have is the best plan in the room. Everybody get quiet and listen to it, and everybody will win

                          Comment


                            #14
                            MARATHON/ Marathoner needs time off to enter World
                            Championships
                            2011/03/02

                            Yuki Kawauchi crossed the finish line and collapsed in
                            exhaustion. The unassuming runner overcame his
                            embarrassment at keeping pace with the bigger names in
                            the field and spurted to a third-place finish in the Tokyo
                            Marathon on Sunday.

                            As the top Japanese finisher in the race, Kawauchi will
                            represent Japan at the World Championships this summer
                            in Daegu, South Korea. That is, if he can get time off work.

                            "I'd like to make a decision after a talk with my boss," he
                            said.

                            Kawauchi, 23, is a public servant of the Saitama prefectural
                            government. He works at the prefectural Kasukabe High
                            School collecting school lunch fees, issuing certificates and
                            performing other tasks.

                            He is also known as a "citizen" runner--marathoners
                            unaffiliated with a professional or corporate team.

                            During the week, Kawauchi's training consists only of two-
                            hour sessions at a park in the morning before his work shift
                            from around noon to 9 p.m.

                            His relatively humble training methods also reflect his
                            nature.

                            "My goal was to rank within the top eight. I wasn't
                            expecting this good a result," he said of his achievement.

                            Kawauchi even said he even felt uncomfortable at times
                            during the race. After the 30-kilometer mark, Yoshinori
                            Oda, a runner affiliated with Toyota Motor Corp., passed
                            Kawauchi and tried to catch up with the two foreign runners
                            leading the pack.

                            Kawauchi said he felt relieved at that point. "Great. Go
                            ahead of me. Now I can be in a safe and comfortable
                            position," he said he thought at the time.

                            But as Kawauchi continued at his own pace, he gradually
                            caught up with Oda. Just before the 39-km point, Kawauchi
                            thought, "I'll see how far I can go," and sped past Oda.

                            Kawauchi had run only five marathons in the past. Four of
                            those times, he ended up in the medical clinic after
                            reaching the finish line.

                            "I run with no fear of dying," he said.

                            On Sunday, too, he fell to the ground after completing the
                            race. "I can finally go to the clinic," he thought with a sense
                            of relief.

                            He covered the last 2.195 km of the course in 6 minutes
                            and 52 seconds, the fastest of all runners that day.

                            Kawauchi isn't exactly an unknown in the marathon world.
                            He gained attention at the Tokyo Marathon last year by
                            finishing fourth.

                            However, marathoners who belong to corporate teams
                            usually run about 1,000 km a month. Kawauchi runs 600
                            km or so.

                            He also compiles his own training schedule, and his running
                            partners are university students and other citizen runners.

                            He said he also likes to run through unknown towns during
                            his travels.

                            "I dropped out of the elite training system," Kawauchi said.

                            Therories have been bandied about on why Kawauchi has
                            been successful.

                            The runner himself said his concentration makes him
                            efficient because he has little time to practice.

                            Others say his drive and ability to fight through pain are
                            the key.

                            "(Kawauchi) can move his legs even if he is suffering. He
                            has the ability to change his pace. That's what contributes
                            to speed in marathons," Yasushi Sakaguchi, chief of the
                            Japan Association of Athletics Federations' men's marathon
                            division, said.

                            Kawauchi first started running every day in a park as a
                            first-grader, accompanied by his mother.

                            But he had a long streak of bad luck. During his years at
                            Kasukabe High School, he was slowed by injuries.
                            Gakushuin University, where he enrolled, had no dedicated
                            training ground
                            It is useless to attempt to reason a man out of a thing he was never reasoned into.

                            Every plan I have is the best plan in the room. Everybody get quiet and listen to it, and everybody will win

                            Comment


                              #15


                              Another up and coming Deise athlete
                              <DIV =storyer>
                              <H1>Veale wins gold at World Youth Championships</H1>Friday, 8 July 2011 16:26 </DIV>
                              <DIV =story><?:namespace prefix = rte ns = "urn:rte-search" /><rte:>


                              Ireland's Kate Veale has won a gold medal in the women's 5,000m walk at the World Youth Championships in Lille, France.


                              Veale won the event in a time of 21 minutes 45.59 seconds, beating her nearest rival Yanxue Mao of China by 15 seconds. Veale's time is also the World Youth Leading time this season.


                              Nadezhda Leontyeva of Russia took bronze.
                              <DIV id=story_island></DIV>


                              The gold represents a massive leap forward for Veale from her fourth-place finish at the World Youth Olympic Games in Singapore in 2010.


                              The Waterford athlete has been in exceptional form of late, taking a bronze medal at the junior women's 10km walk at the European Cup of Race Walking in the Algarve on 21 May.


                              At the AVIVA Schools Track and Field Championships, Veale also easily won the senior 3,000m walk in a time of 12:40.09, demolishing Anne Loughnane's 2003 record of 13:51.</rte:></DIV>
                              Anybody who sees a psychiatrist would want their head examined.*&nb sp;Henry Ford

                              Comment

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