Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Ed Joyce replaces Trecothick!!!

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    Ed Joyce replaces Trecothick!!!

    How the hell......I thought he was injured long term.........

    #2
    He was back playing before the end of the season even. A very quick recovery and he started more or less from where he was before the injury. The call-up was bit of a surprise as after the injury it was assumed that he wouldn't get a chance to impress the England selectors before the start of the tour.
    \"What is wrong with a drug that makes teen-age boys drive slowly?\"
    P. J. O\'Rourke

    Comment


      #3
      [img]smileys/thumb-up.gif[/img]

      Comment


        #4
        <TABLE cellSpacing=0 cellPadding=0 width=465><T><T><T>
        <T>
        <TR>
        <TD>
        <TABLE cellSpacing=0 cellPadding=0 width=465><T><T><T>
        <T>
        <TR>
        <TD vAlign=top>
        <H1>Joyce homes in on chance</H1>@@@@SPAN ="byline">JOHN STERN@@@@/SPAN>

        <H3>The Middlesex left-hander compares favourably to a former great and could flourish if given the chance in Australia</H3></TD></TR></T></T></T></T></TABLE></TD></TR>
        <TR>
        <TD height=5></TD></TR>
        <TR>
        <TD>
        <TABLE cellSpacing=0 cellPadding=0 width=465><T><T><T>
        <T>
        <TR>
        <TD vAlign=top>
        <DIV ="textcopy">JUST as comparisons with Ian Botham have burdened English allrounders of recent times, a likeness to David Gower would seem heavy baggage for a left-handed batsman to carry. But when John Emburey, the Middlesex coach and former England teammate of Gower, compares Ed Joyce with one of England’s greatest batsmen, he does so with a matter-of- factness that implies confidence in his opinion.


        Emburey is not making rash predictions about Joyce scoring 8,000-plus Test runs, but he is comfortable with the comparison in terms of style and personality. Not that he means Joyce is about to jump in a Tiger Moth and buzz the Gabba next Thursday.


        “Ed has lots of time to play the ball and has an ability to keep the scoreboard ticking over the way Gower did,” Emburey says. “They are similar as players and characters. Ed scores at a good tempo. He never gets tied down.” He adds that there is “nothing flamboyant” about Joyce, which seems to contradict the Gower comparison. But the point is that Gower made run-scoring look easy, completely natural, as if he had been born with a bat in his hand. He made batting beautiful, but his innings were not full of great flourishes or huge hay-making strokes like Botham, Flintoff and Pietersen.


        “Despite the elegant flicks through midwicket and cover- drives, Ed is a pragmatic batsman,” says Ed Smith, the new Middlesex captain. “He knows where the runs are.” Smith describes Joyce as a “Sudoku king and master of understated wit”. Emburey talks of his “very dry” humour, adding that he has not required much coaching, because he has so much natural ability.


        Joyce, who recently turned 28, was spotted by Middlesex playing for Ireland and made his County Championship debut at the end of the 1999 season. It was not until 2002 that he cemented a place in their middle order, but he has hardly looked back since. He has passed 1,000 runs in each of the past five seasons and has averaged more than 50 in the past two.


        Emburey spoke to his man on the phone after the call-up had come from the selectors. “Some people would have been jumping up and down, pumping their fists,” he said. “Ed’s not that kind of bloke, but you could tell how chuffed and how proud he was.” Emburey believes that Joyce being a left-hander may have been the clinching factor in his selection to replace Marcus Trescothick ahead of Robert Key and Owais Shah.


        If Joyce does play in the Ashes at any stage, he will become the sixth Irish-born cricketer to play a Test for England and only the second Edmund in the history of Test cricket. He will hope to have more success than the last Irishman to play for England, the Northern Ireland fast bowler Martin McCague, who grew up in Australia and was described by an Australian newspaper as the first instance of “a rat joining a sinking ship”.


        England supporters are used to their team containing an eclectic mix of birthplaces and upbringings, but a Dublin-born cricketer might still seem unusual. It would have seemed less unlikely had you been at the ICC Trophy in Ireland last year, when 12 of the world’s lesser cricket nations played off for the right to join next year’s World Cup party in the Caribbean. Ireland, with Joyce lead- ing from the front alongside his brother Dominick, lost in the final to Scotland, but go to the World Cup for the first time.


        For the other aspiring national teams in the British Isles, producing talented players
        New infraction avoidance policy: a post may be described as imbecilic, but its author should never be described as an imbecile.

        Comment


          #5
          Is 28 old for a cricket player? Hope it goes well for him.
          It is useless to attempt to reason a man out of a thing he was never reasoned into.

          Every plan I have is the best plan in the room. Everybody get quiet and listen to it, and everybody will win

          Comment


            #6


            Originally posted by JoeyFantastic
            Is 28 old for a cricket player? Hope it goes well for him.

            I think 38 is the expected retirement age

            Comment

            Working...
            X