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    Provos for hire !!!



    Freed Provos are gangland 'guns for hire'

    Sunday December 17th 2006



    JIM CUSACK and


    JODY CORCORAN


    FORMER Provisional IRA men freed under the Good Friday Agreement are selling terrorist expertise to Dublin and Limerick criminal gangs, creating the most serious security crisis in the State since the IRA ceasefire in 1994.


    Dublin Garda sources say organised crime has now reached its worst ever levels.


    With further killings expected, high visibility armed patrols - involving gardai wearing body armour and carrying sub-machinguns - will, for the first time, be on duty over Christmas.


    Gangland crime is again so serious that the Taoiseach, Bertie Ahern and the Minister for Justice, Michael McDowell, will hold a crisis meeting with Garda Commissioner Noel Conroy and Deputy Garda Commissioner Fachtna Murphy tomorrow. They will discuss the deployment of resources in the short to medium-term, the tightening of bail procedures and the need for speedier trials.


    There is great public anger that 23 of the 24 known close associates of slain crime boss Martin 'Marlo' Hyland were on bail when he was murdered on Tuesday.


    There was public revulsion when Hyland's killers also murdered an innocent young plumber, Anthony Campbell, who had witnessed the attack.


    Hyland was known to be linked to the Provisional IRA, although the Taoiseach has said he does not believe the IRA was directly involved in his murder.


    Gardai have indicated to Government that additional support staff is necessary to free officers on the ground


    ANALYSIS





    from subsequent office-bound duties; extra staff are also needed in the courts system to allow cases come to trial quicker.


    But the current application of the bail laws, in particular, will be top of the agenda on Monday. In a 1996 referendum, provision was made for the courts to refuse bail to a person charged with a serious offence where it was reasonably considered necessary to prevent the commission of a serious offence.


    Judges, however, are not taking a consistent line on the outcome of that referendum, something which is causing great concern at the heart of Government. Mr McDowell has criticised "soft judges" allowing hardened criminals out on bail despite strong Garda objections. Mr Conroy has said he supports the minister's views.


    Although they have not yet publicly responded, judges do intend to make their views known "in their own time in their own way".


    The discussions tomorrow between the country's most senior politicians and Garda will examine what gardai, the Director of Public Prosecutions and the judiciary can reasonably do to resolve this situation.


    Public demand for immediate action is reflected in a Sunday Independent telephone poll of 500 homes, which has found an overwhelming majority (96 per cent) want the non-jury Special Criminal Court to deal with organised criminal gangs, with just 4 per cent opposed.


    Indeed, the public is showing little appetite for the niceties of current due process. A significant 75 per cent would support the use of administrative detention orders, effectively internment, suggested by Fine Gael, and used in the Netherlands, to keep petty dealers off the streets while they are being investigated; only 25 per cent would oppose such an initiative.


    The Sunday Independent can reveal that there have been at least seven attempted murders in the north-inner city in the last 13 months. Another criminal, Gerard Byrne, 26, was shot dead at the Irish Financial Services Centre on Wednesday.


    The manner of Byrne's murder has also given rise to suspicions that a hired assassin was responsi
    \"As she lay there dozing next to me, one voice inside my head kept saying, \'Relax, you\'re not the first doctor to sleep with one of his patients\', but the another kept reminding me, \' you are a veterinarian!\'\"

    #2
    no need
    just lure your enemies to mayo and gun them down legally

    If the lessons of history teach us anything it is that nobody learns the lessons that history teaches us.

    Comment


      #3


      Originally posted by munsterforever
      no need
      just lure your enemies to mayo and gun them down legally




      There's a quality articleby the excellent Gene Kerrigan about the Ward murder on the back page of today's Sunday Independent.


      I've posted it onthe appropriate thread.


      New infraction avoidance policy: a post may be described as imbecilic, but its author should never be described as an imbecile.

      Comment


        #4
        Disappointed the above posters can't distinguish between a good person murdering someone and a bad person killing someone.
        It is useless to attempt to reason a man out of a thing he was never reasoned into.

        Every plan I have is the best plan in the room. Everybody get quiet and listen to it, and everybody will win

        Comment


          #5


          Originally posted by JoeyFantastic


          Disappointed the above posters can't distinguish between a good person murdering someone and a bad person killing someone.


          Who me? But I'm with you all the way, Joey. [img]smileys/sad.gif[/img]


          New infraction avoidance policy: a post may be described as imbecilic, but its author should never be described as an imbecile.

          Comment


            #6


            I can see it's still too early for sarcasm.


            How a society can appluad the inhumane death Nally gave Ward, and let's be honest, being shot,getting the s**t kicked out of you, being chased down a road, and having a crazy farmer stand over you and shoot you from point blank range is an inhumane death, but obviously a deserved one, since Ward was trespassing (remind me never to risk borrowing sugar off half the posters on this site) while at the same time decry the feud related killings in Dublin and Limerick, is a mystery to me. How did we get to the point that people have no faith in our legislators to deal with crime, for our Courts to penalise it or our police to persue it?


            People wonder why Irish society is perceived to be becoming more violent and yet see no problem, legal, ethical or moral, with what Nally did. Time for Diogenes to call around again.
            It is useless to attempt to reason a man out of a thing he was never reasoned into.

            Every plan I have is the best plan in the room. Everybody get quiet and listen to it, and everybody will win

            Comment


              #7





              Didn't he live in a barrel? Heavy drinker.
              New infraction avoidance policy: a post may be described as imbecilic, but its author should never be described as an imbecile.

              Comment


                #8
                Lived in a tub, when does a tub become a barrel?
                It is useless to attempt to reason a man out of a thing he was never reasoned into.

                Every plan I have is the best plan in the room. Everybody get quiet and listen to it, and everybody will win

                Comment


                  #9


                  Originally posted by JoeyFantastic


                  Lived in a tub, when does a tub become a barrel?


                  When it grows up?
                  New infraction avoidance policy: a post may be described as imbecilic, but its author should never be described as an imbecile.

                  Comment


                    #10

                    Originally posted by JoeyFantastic
                    How did we get to the point that people have no faith in our legislators to deal with crime, for our Courts to penalise it or our police to persue it?
                    Do you have that faith Joey? I certainly don't. I'm not getting into the rights and wrongs of the Nally case but it's pretty clear that the criminal justice system isn't working.
                    Kiva - Loans That Change Lives

                    Comment


                      #11
                      But people don't want the system to work Dave, people have no problem buying drugs (though they seemingly hate drug dealers), people don't mind speeding, though they hate road traffic deaths, people hate corruption, but see nothing wrong with Bertie getting a whip around, people can't stand cronyism but don't mind calling in family connections for jobs. We're a nation (imo) of self-deluders, we don't associate the joint on Saturday with the shooting last Tuesday.
                      It is useless to attempt to reason a man out of a thing he was never reasoned into.

                      Every plan I have is the best plan in the room. Everybody get quiet and listen to it, and everybody will win

                      Comment


                        #12
                        Very true, I don't disagree at all. The point I was more getting at is the sentencing judges hand out and things like guys getting off dangerous driving at 200kph because they should have been charged with speeding etc..
                        Kiva - Loans That Change Lives

                        Comment


                          #13


                          Originally posted by JoeyFantastic
                          But people don't want the system to work Dave, people have no problem buying drugs (though they seemingly hate drug dealers), people don't mind speeding, though they hate road traffic deaths, people hate corruption, but see nothing wrong with Bertie getting a whip around, people can't stand cronyism but don't mind calling in family connections for jobs. We're a nation (imo) of self-deluders, we don't associate the joint on Saturday with the shooting last Tuesday.



                          [img]smileys/thumb-up.gif[/img]The applaud smiley is gone but yes,JF that's where it all really stems from.
                          The early bird catches the worm but it's the second mouse that gets the cheese.

                          Comment


                            #14


                            So our already overcrowded prisons can become moreso? People don't want to pay more taxes for more prisons (or teachers, guards etc), people want to give out down the pub and keep their money in their pocket. I know people don't mind where their tax money is already going (though imo, it is montrously misspent) since the opinion polls regularly return high figures for the Gov.


                            People love the law in theory, they just don't want applied to them.
                            It is useless to attempt to reason a man out of a thing he was never reasoned into.

                            Every plan I have is the best plan in the room. Everybody get quiet and listen to it, and everybody will win

                            Comment


                              #15
                              Fair enough but I would make the point that something like 10% of the prison population is there for continually not paying fines. I'd like to see them not imprisoned but some mandatory way of recovering the money from them implemented, and the imprison more people for what I regard as more serious crimes.
                              Kiva - Loans That Change Lives

                              Comment

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