Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Banks, Economy, Housing Thread - BOOM 2.0

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    Originally posted by Old Dog


    Piquet was nit picking I won't deny it. - none of them are NTs, but they're all secondary/vocational teacher types. No see below


    Eamon Ryan is the only Minister with an authentic business background. No see below


    No Old Dog please try and get your facts/ terminology correct. Of the present government only Hannafin, Dempsey and Martin are/were secondary teachers. Gormley ran his own Language school and Batt Lectured in Cork RTC/IT.


    Cowen, ODea, and Ahern were/are Solicitors, Lenihan a Barrister, Cullen a Sales Rep, Ryan ran a Tour Operators, Young Dev was a Co-op Manager and, it seems a reasonably sucessful one at that.


    Coughlan was a Social Worker


    This leaves Smith who advised Rory O'Hanlon for a living and Harney who lists herself as a "Research Worker "

    Comment


      Lenihan also lectured in tCD although I think he may hve given that up before he was elected in 1995.
      \"This year is different because this year they won\'t beat snow off a rope. They\'ll revert back to type and get 6 shades of s**t bate out of them in the group stages of the HEC ...\" Tobyglen 21 Sept 2010

      Comment



        Originally posted by Piquet
        Originally posted by Old Dog


        Piquet was nit picking I won't deny it.</font> - none of them are NTs, but they're all secondary/vocational teacher types. No see below </font>


        Eamon Ryan is the only Minister with an authentic business background. No</font> see below </font>






        Cowen, ODea, and Ahern were/are Solicitors,
        Not so, O'Dea is both a barrister and an accountant. Clearly a smart guy, which is pretty much at odds with how he comes across in his public statements etc.
        It is useless to attempt to reason a man out of a thing he was never reasoned into.

        Every plan I have is the best plan in the room. Everybody get quiet and listen to it, and everybody will win

        Comment


          ECB cut just announced as .25 basis points, not 50 as expected.

          Comment


            Back breaking work this bunker building. The veggie row conceals it nicely, though.

            Now I just need to arm myself to the teeth. Harry, me old son ...?

            Please support Milford Hospice. Click here to donate.

            Comment


              "Fingers" quits...[img]smileys/biggrin.gif[/img]

              02/04/2009 - 11:37:33</span>
              Irish
              Nationwide’s long-time chief executive Michael Fingleton is to leave
              the company at the end of April, it was announced today.

              The
              veteran banking boss handed back a €1m bonus after it emerged it was
              signed off just weeks after the Government stepped in with the bank
              guarantee scheme.

              Mr Fingleton agreed to hand back the one-off payment last Friday following sustained pressure.

              Irish
              Nationwide praised the outgoing chief executive, who is widely credited
              with growing the building society over the last four decades to one of
              the country’s major lenders.

              “The board has been aware for some
              time that Mr Fingleton was seeking to retire and intended to do so on
              February 28, 2009 on completion of his extended contract,” Irish
              Nationwide said in a statement.

              “He had deferred his retirement
              to the end of this month to facilitate the society following the
              resignation of Dr Michael Walsh as chairman.”

              The board confirmed Mr Fingleton will retire on April 30.

              “The
              board wishes to thank Mr Fingleton for the enormous and unique
              contribution he has made to the society over the past 37 years and wish
              both Michael and his wife Eileen many happy years of retirement,” the
              company said.

              Mr Fingleton was given the €1m bonus just weeks
              after the Government bank guarantee scheme was introduced last
              September but Irish Nationwide claimed the reward had been approved
              months prior to the introduction of the protection.

              Two weeks after the bonus was publicly revealed Mr Fingleton said he would hand it back.

              While
              the building society insisted the hunt had been on for a new chief
              executive for the last four months, the board have been called in to a
              series of meetings with senior Department of Finance officials and it
              is understood pressure has been heaped on top executives to speed up
              the search.

              Boardroom banking positions in Irish Nationwide will
              also be restructured and senior board member Daniel Kitchen will become
              non-executive chairman.

              As the search for a new Chief Executive continues, Mr Kitchen will also take on the role.

              The
              Irish Nationwide Board also proposes to amend the rules at the
              forthcoming AGM to increase the number of directors from eight to 10.



              Comment


                Originally posted by JoeyFantastic







                Not so, O'Dea is both a barrister and an accountant. Clearly a smart guy, which is pretty much at odds with how he comes across in his public statements etc.

                I stand corrected. A classic case of Murphy's Law. I thought I knew for definite thathe was a solicitor so I never looked it up.

                Comment




                  Originally posted by fitzy73
                  Now I just need to arm myself to the teeth. Harry, me old son ...?
                  and meanwhile back in the real world



                  Thursday, April 02, 2009</span>

                  Queuing for food </span>
                  by Shaun Connolly, Political Correspondent </span>

                  A HUMAN river of despair and hunger flowed to the gates of the Capuchin Friary. </span>

                  In
                  scenes reminiscent of a failed state, more than 700 people queued from
                  early morning amid fears they would miss the free food parcels to be
                  distributed — and they were right to worry as demand overwhelmed the
                  friars and basic items like bread, tea, sugar and canned foods all ran
                  out.

                  The speed and brutality with which the economic crisis is
                  searing through Irish society was clear from the faces of young people
                  and parents amidst the hundreds of people snaking along Dublin’s Church
                  Street, their grim reality mocked by the unseasonal sunshine.


                  Brother Kevin Crowley expressed deep sadness at the desperation
                  unfolding before him, but, with the numbers of those in need doubling
                  so quickly, the day centre could no longer cope with demand.


                  The friary is a lifeline for people who would once have looked upon it
                  only as a destination for the homeless and truly destitute.


                  Struggling families, youngsters and ex-professionals reeling from the
                  suddenness of their fall from financial security made up a large swathe
                  of the crowd, Br Crowley said. "I was talking to one young man who felt
                  terrible he had to come here for food, but he was hungry and had no
                  choice."

                  This is not an isolated sight, merely a snapshot of the human cost of a crisis which is being repeated across Ireland.


                  Taoiseach Brian Cowen has warned of five more years of pain, with
                  living standards diving by 10% and, for the first time in the history
                  of the state, the next generation doing worse than the present one.
                  That pain is already hurting hard as the Live Register reached a grim
                  new all-time high of 372,800 people in March.

                  Mr Cowen
                  mumbled his way through the latest figures in the Dáil, as if he could
                  not bear to raise his voice to make it audible. And who would want to
                  preside over such a shameful national waste of lives and talent?


                  More than 80,000 people have swelled the dole queues in just three
                  months — a 90% rise in one year — and Mr Cowen knows it’s only going to
                  get worse as he admits the register will top 450,000 by year’s end. If
                  he is willing publicly to acknowledge that, then there must be fear the
                  reality could be much worse. Mr Cowen must see restricted cabinet
                  papers warning of the social consequences of 500,000 or even 600,000 on
                  the dole — it’s going to be a long, cold, bitter recession.


                  There was no comfort to be drawn from the fact that the increase in
                  those joining the welfare rolls had slowed from 1,000 a day to 500 a
                  day during March. Gallows humour would suggest the drop is merely due
                  to the fact the country now feels like it is simply running out of any
                  jobs left to cut.

                  Br Crowley wonders how he will feed the
                  masses that flood into the day centre — those seeking free meals have
                  doubled to 430 a day — on donations of e1m a year. Nearly half of that
                  total, e450,000, comes from a government grant, but with welfare
                  payments in the firing line of next week’s crisis budget, as well as
                  everything else, who knows what the future holds?

                  "It used to
                  be the homeless, but now it’s those who have just lost their jobs,
                  young people and families coming to us — and that’s worrying," Br
                  Crowley added.

                  The friary ran out of food parcels for the
                  first time yesterday and was forced to leave some people empty-handed.
                  However, that will not stop the tide of misery continuing to sweep
                  along Church Street to its doors.</span>
                  Frank the Tank is not coming back. OK? That part of me is over, water under the bridge.

                  Comment


                    That is utterly depressing.
                    Please support Milford Hospice. Click here to donate.

                    Comment


                      I hope the people who bought us to this passrot in hell.
                      Excellence is hard to keep quite - Sherrie Coale

                      Comment


                        Why wait for a fictional afterlife to punish them? Why not just lump the b*****ds into jail?
                        "It’s not the team you support, it’s the club you should support. The team on the pitch will ebb and flow because that’s the nature of sport. No team has ever been successful decade on decade. The club has the history and that’s the passion you should have."

                        Comment




                          Originally posted by Jenta
                          Why wait for a fictional afterlife to punish them? Why not just lump the b*****ds into jail?

                          Who should go to jail? Well apart from the people involved in the funds transfer on 30 September between IL&amp;P and Anglo. I have no doubt those people will end up in jail.


                          But who else????

                          Comment




                            Originally posted by Jenta
                            Why wait for a fictional afterlife to punish them? Why not just lump the b*****ds into jail?

                            Life is to short....
                            Excellence is hard to keep quite - Sherrie Coale

                            Comment



                              Originally posted by Jenta
                              Why wait for a fictional afterlife to punish them? Why not just lump the b*****ds into jail?
                              They were just following orders.
                              It is useless to attempt to reason a man out of a thing he was never reasoned into.

                              Every plan I have is the best plan in the room. Everybody get quiet and listen to it, and everybody will win

                              Comment




                                Originally posted by Harry

                                Queuing for food
                                by Shaun Connolly, Political Correspondent

                                A HUMAN river of despair and hunger flowed to the gates of the Capuchin Friary.


                                Are things really that bad?
                                "We will not walk in fear, one of another. We will not be driven into an age of unreason if we dig deep into our history and remember we are not descended from fearful men" Edward R Murrow

                                "Little by little, we have been brought into the present condition in which we are able neither to tolerate the evils from which we suffer, nor the remedies we need to cure them." - Livy


                                "I think that progress has been made by two flames that have always been burning in the human heart. The flame of anger against injustice and the flame of hope that you can build a better world" - Tony Benn

                                Comment

                                Working...
                                X