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    Originally posted by The Last Stand View Post
    I think you are right but I still think that is not good governance. Needs proper oversight by parliament. I believe that it does happen behind closed doors at the labour and FG parliamentary party meetings where Ministers frequently get a rough ride on policies but that is not good enough in my view.
    A lot those reports about ministers getting a tough time behind closed doors are to give the impression that theres robust oversight going on.
    I think its nonsense, this government and particularly FG are very good at playing the media game.

    Even this current debacle about the siteserv deal will be dampened down by all the talk about the upcoming referendum.
    Nice timing.

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      Banks - Economy - Housing thread

      Originally posted by Major TNT View Post
      A lot those reports about ministers getting a tough time behind closed doors are to give the impression that theres robust oversight going on.
      I think its nonsense, this government and particularly FG are very good at playing the media game.

      Even this current debacle about the siteserv deal will be dampened down by all the talk about the upcoming referendum.
      Nice timing.
      Whether they do (get a rough ride) or not I don't know and nor do you unless you are a dis affected back bench TD. But there is a gap in oversight which should be addressed. I suspect that may be one of the few things we do agree on.
      Last edited by The Last Stand; 27th-April-2015, 15:18.

      Comment


        Some Iran style carry on over "publishing" the Siteserv list of shareholders. I remember when they were just a ****e scaffolding company, never thought they would end up being the poster boys for the next corruption wave.
        "Everything good about Ireland can be found in County Cork"....Lonely Planet Guide 2012

        Comment


          Austerity doesn't work says Krugman.
          The austerity delusion is dead, unless you’re British,’ says Paul Krugman
          April 29, 2015 15:44

          Nobel Laureate and US economist, Paul Krugman. (Reuters / Brendan McDermid)

          Conservative and Labour plans to unleash further austerity on Britain’s electorate have been denounced by distinguished global economist Paul Krugman who warns continued austerity will hamper Britain’s incomplete economic recovery.

          In a letter published by the Guardian on Wednesday titled ‘The Austerity delusion,’ the Nobel Prize-winning economist challenged Prime Minister David Cameron’s claim to have saved the British economy.

          Krugman, who teaches Economics at Princeton University, said Britain only returned to growth midway through the government’s term in power after it caved on its agenda of repairing the nation’s finances in a five year stint.

          In a scathing attack on Labour and the Conservatives, Krugman said the Tories are doomed to repeat the same mistakes if they enter government for a second term, while Labour’s failure to oppose austerity is perplexing.

          Krugman warned against the resurgence of “austerity fever,” which gripped Western elites in the wake of the financial crisis. He stressed this loyalty to fiscal rectitude was a delusion born of hope and fear.

          Reflecting on recent economic history, Krugman said the benefits of fiscal probity peddled so furiously by austerity advocates never materialized.

          Every single state that ran a significant deficit in the wake of the global financial crisis has suffered, with each country’s depth of suffering related to the ferocity of austerity applied, he said.

          Krugman also noted that the International Monetary Fund (IMF) now believes it “massively understated the damage that spending cuts inflict on a weak economy” and that all economic research backing austerity “has been discredited.”

          Krugman said the austerity ideology “has collapsed” worldwide and is considered to be widely discredited, yet Britain’s coalition government and mainstream media still buy it.

          “I don’t know how many Britons realize the extent to which their economic debate has diverged from the rest of the western world – the extent to which the UK seems stuck on obsessions that have been mainly laughed out of the discourse elsewhere,” he said.

          Attacking the British establishment, Krugman contrasted the UK’s political climate with that of America’s. With a mixture of bewilderment and amusement, he noted the UK press depicted Ed Miliband’s recent failure to broach the budget deficit in a campaign speech as a blunder of seismic proportions while Hillary Clinton is straight talking about the “fun deficit” facing children across the US.

          Krugman said an overarching “deficit obsession” rules in Britain even as it fades elsewhere. He said this “intellectually bankrupt” devotion to austerity has become a “distinctly British delusion” and will inevitably lead to further economic struggle.

          Reflecting on the Conservative Party’s legacy in government, Krugman claimed the party used “the alleged dangers of debt and deficits as clubs with which to beat the welfare state and justify cuts in benefits.”

          Focusing on Labour, he added: “If the political opposition won’t challenge the coalition’s bad economics, who will?”

          Turning his gaze to the Eurozone, the Nobel laureate noted the European Central Bank has deviated somewhat from its previous austerity-fuelled path.

          In particular, he stressed the ECB’s decision to buy bonds from financially struggling Eurozone states allows it to finally “do its job” and protect its clients against market volatility and “self-fulfilling panics.”

          “Italy and Spain have no trouble raising cash – they can borrow at the lowest rates in their history, indeed considerably below those in Britain – and even Portugal’s interest rates are within a whisker of those paid by HM Treasury,” he said.
          So I walked as day was dawning
          Where small birds sang and leaves were falling
          Where we once watched the row boats landing
          By the broad majestic shannon

          Comment


            You can put Enda and Joan into that bracket as well. They will be looking for your vote as well and remember their vote for me and you will get this election politics today.
            Excellence is hard to keep quite - Sherrie Coale

            Comment


              Austerity?
              sure wasn't that just to ride taxpayers and give the money to private banks!

              Comment


                Anyone with a passing economic literacy knew that austerity was horse **** at the time. It was supported by the same room temperature intellect right wing ideologues who are still touting themselves around as the voices of common sense, sound judgement and all that other ****nuttery.

                Shameless half wits to a man.
                "We will not walk in fear, one of another. We will not be driven into an age of unreason if we dig deep into our history and remember we are not descended from fearful men" Edward R Murrow

                "Little by little, we have been brought into the present condition in which we are able neither to tolerate the evils from which we suffer, nor the remedies we need to cure them." - Livy


                "I think that progress has been made by two flames that have always been burning in the human heart. The flame of anger against injustice and the flame of hope that you can build a better world" - Tony Benn

                Comment


                  Originally posted by Balla Boy View Post
                  Anyone with a passing economic literacy knew that austerity was horse **** at the time. It was supported by the same room temperature intellect right wing ideologues who are still touting themselves around as the voices of common sense, sound judgement and all that other ****nuttery.

                  Shameless half wits to a man.
                  Austerity as a global policy was and is nuts. But Irelands situation was so bad that we had no choice but to cut spending and increase taxes. And that is day to day spending. As a small open economy our problems were worse as a result of the international environment. Not to mention the Government who was in place for a lot of that period were completely damaged, had lost domestic and international confidence and were literally falling down.

                  Even Krugman would find it hard to argue against this, although he would say that there should have been transfers from the core but not as lending.

                  Comment


                    Not sure TLS. Austerity almost directly took money out of our economy and core services are now in a desperate state. Almost forced emigration for some vital sections of the community, some would argue, was one the results of austerity here. Austerity has divided our society too. We still have houses on Shrewsbury Road selling for €58mn on one hand and people threatened with homelessness on the other because their rent allowance is purposely insufficient. Fortunately we have not gone down the road of foodbanks and slave labour to punish our people like sacrificial lambs ala UK.
                    So I walked as day was dawning
                    Where small birds sang and leaves were falling
                    Where we once watched the row boats landing
                    By the broad majestic shannon

                    Comment


                      Our actual spending on core services was largely preserved.

                      Problem is, it was preserved by largely maintaining wages at the expense of services. I've made this comparison in the past, but criminal justice saw, in effect, cuts of over 30% for those running trials, yet trials are run as efficiently as before. Health saw much lower cuts, yet is a shambles. That, to me, suggests the largest difference is a determination to prioritise service over wages. And I'm genuinely not sure that determination is there in many core services, especially the HSE.
                      Ceterum censeo INM irrumandum esse.

                      Comment


                        Originally posted by Thomond78 View Post
                        Our actual spending on core services was largely preserved.

                        Problem is, it was preserved by largely maintaining wages at the expense of services. I've made this comparison in the past, but criminal justice saw, in effect, cuts of over 30% for those running trials, yet trials are run as efficiently as before. Health saw much lower cuts, yet is a shambles. That, to me, suggests the largest difference is a determination to prioritise service over wages. And I'm genuinely not sure that determination is there in many core services, especially the HSE.
                        My sister is a doctor and has seen her wages fall by nearly 40% in the past 4 years.
                        "It’s not the team you support, it’s the club you should support. The team on the pitch will ebb and flow because that’s the nature of sport. No team has ever been successful decade on decade. The club has the history and that’s the passion you should have."

                        Comment


                          Pay in the education sector was cut by 20 percent. Student numbers have climbed. Service continued uninterrupted (except for the teachers who lost their jobs).

                          Originally posted by Thomond78 View Post
                          Our actual spending on core services was largely preserved.

                          Problem is, it was preserved by largely maintaining wages at the expense of services. I've made this comparison in the past, but criminal justice saw, in effect, cuts of over 30% for those running trials, yet trials are run as efficiently as before. Health saw much lower cuts, yet is a shambles. That, to me, suggests the largest difference is a determination to prioritise service over wages. And I'm genuinely not sure that determination is there in many core services, especially the HSE.

                          Comment


                            Originally posted by Jenta View Post
                            My sister is a doctor and has seen her wages fall by nearly 40% in the past 4 years.
                            Both of my brothers are. A cut to rates for new entrants to a grade isn't a cut to existing people on that grade, or those outside that grade, because they never had it in hand.
                            Ceterum censeo INM irrumandum esse.

                            Comment


                              Originally posted by Balla Boy View Post
                              Anyone with a passing economic literacy knew that austerity was horse **** at the time. It was supported by the same room temperature intellect right wing ideologues who are still touting themselves around as the voices of common sense, sound judgement and all that other ****nuttery.

                              Shameless half wits to a man.
                              #

                              Then why are the (UK) Labour party vowing to continue with it?
                              Please support Milford Hospice. Click here to donate.

                              Comment


                                Originally posted by fitzy73 View Post
                                #

                                Then why are the (UK) Labour party vowing to continue with it?
                                I think Kent Brockman neatly covered that one...
                                Ceterum censeo INM irrumandum esse.

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