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Down memory Lane, Limerick (c. 1990)

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    Down memory Lane, Limerick (c. 1990)

    courtesy of the cork examiner.










    #2
    The last one looks like something from the Blitz!

    Is that when Ranks (eventually) came down?
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      #3
      Originally posted by fitzy73 View Post
      The last one looks like something from the Blitz!

      Is that when Ranks (eventually) came down?
      Reminds me of the cranberries zombie video

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        #4
        Originally posted by fitzy73 View Post
        The last one looks like something from the Blitz!

        Is that when Ranks (eventually) came down?
        They are all from around wategate and parts of johnsgate.
        psychoanalysis is wasted on the Irish; Sigmund Freud

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          #5
          I think the first one is around the Tanyard lane, John catherderal in the background
          all others around Watergate, if I could read the sign clearly in the last pic could tell you exactly .
          psychoanalysis is wasted on the Irish; Sigmund Freud

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            #6
            1990 ain't that (too) long ago
            Nulla semper amicus, servivit mihi, in iniuriam mihi neminem quem non persolvi

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              #7
              The first one I think is Curry Lane looking up to Grattan St, and the last one is probably the other end of the lane looking towards Clare St. The photo of Watergate is taken from Charlotte Quay, in the days of the old surface car park.

              Not sure about the 3rd and 4th - probably around the St Mary's / Island area before they built the Abbey Bridge.

              Limerick definitely looked blitzed back then, but all those places have been re-built.
              "I don't believe in fairytales," O'Connell once told me, "even though it feels like I've been lucky enough to live through a few. However it ends, I'll feel lucky."
              Donald McRae, Guardian Rugby, October 2015

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                #8
                always some great pics:
                http://www.memorylanelimerick.com/
                https://www.flickr.com/photos/45755268@N00/sets/

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                  #9
                  3 & 4 are from the abbey area the Irish secondary school on mary street is now located on this site along with some houses

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                    #10
                    2 paragraphs stand out there....



                    There were disgraceful scenes at midnight mass on Christmas Eve – fellas scuttered at the back of the Redemptorist’s singing Fun Boy Three songs. Oh and here again was that facial expression particular to the city – our signature look of innocence aggrieved. Everyone made plans to leave. Everyone came back in the summer. When by the lottery of Atlantic weather we were granted a fine evening that summer the light over the broad river, across the sky, that fell on the Clare hills, it was extraordinary. We were in the west of Ireland but largely we were disowned by the west of Ireland. We didn’t fit the noble rural peasant template. It was the western seaboard’s only truly urban space but the city was never considered inherently attached to the west of Ireland. The faces didn’t fit. The narrative was off. We were the awkward squad.



                    10. Besieged even once, a city will always be prone to the same fate, and that fate has recurred again and again over the span of many centuries – history as an echo chamber. By the early 1990s, it’s not too much of a stretch to say that Limerick was besieged by the forces of the New Banal. God and socialism were booted out the same gap. The city was redrawn as nothing more extravagant than an outdoor shopping centre with ample parking. It was simultaneously spruced up and desexualised. It was prettified and it was spayed.
                    Cruise’s Hotel was knocked and Cruises Street – which is essentially a facsimile of a street in Milton Keynes – replaced it. Where the Black and Tans couldn’t break us, Next and Zara so easily could. So much of the old city has been razed, rezoned, rehashed.

                    So much from these photographs seems to have disappeared forever now. But the old city has not quite gone away. It exists still in the subconscious realms, of the people and the place both. If you close your eyes, you can hear it easily – the whining yowl of the wind off the river, and the glorious fast vowels of the city’s mean talk.
                    He was as lame as a duck. Not the metaphorical lame duck either, but a real duck that was actually lame. Maybe from stepping on a land mine or something.

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                      #11
                      The 'blitz look' was mainly achieved by the decision to clear the slums once and for all and build social housing in new suburbs at the edge of the Corporation area. A lot of Angela's Ashes Limerick was bulldozed then. I recall my mother complaining after the publication of Angela's Ashes that that Frank McCourt had no reason to complain about Limerick as his mother had a fine three-bed corporation house in Janesboro.

                      I guess in a city in long term commercial decline the net impact was a Detroit effect, with the hollowing out of the city.

                      http://www.limerickregeneration.org/...erick_City.pdf
                      The introduction of the Housing White Paper (1948) kick-started the construction of social housing again in the city.
                      The city boundary was extended in 1950, mainly to acquire more land for social housing. In the 1950s the territory acquired as a result of the boundary extension was extensively built upon and a total of 1,751 units were built during the course of the decade. The principal housing schemes constructed in the 1950s were Ballinacurra Weston (356 units), Ballynanty Beg (469 units), Rathbane (222 units), Carey's Road (175 units), Garryowen (330 units) and Island Road (85 units). In terms of the proportion of the total housing stock in the city, Limerick Corporation was the most productive social housing provider of all Irish local authorities.

                      Within 45 years (1932-87) the slums were el iminated and replaced . While many other persons on lower incomes were able to acquire modern and affordable houses. In addition, the Corporation also made an enormous contribution to the private sector through the provis i on of the home loans under the Small Dwellings Acquisition Act of1899 and its successors.


                      Last edited by rathbaner; 19th-December-2017, 12:19.
                      Munster – Champions of Europe 2006, 2008, 2019.

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                        #12
                        Originally posted by treatycity1 View Post
                        I think the first one is around the Tanyard lane, John catherderal in the background
                        all others around Watergate, if I could read the sign clearly in the last pic could tell you exactly .
                        The last one looks out on to the Dublin road from old clare street, in the back round you can see the entrance to the canal and to the right of it there is currently a petrol station.

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                          #13
                          I remember when Dublin looked as blitzed as that from Thomas Street down to the Quays. Around same time in the late 80s. Ireland was a kip back then.

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                            #14
                            Originally posted by zeno View Post
                            I remember when Dublin looked as blitzed as that from Thomas Street down to the Quays. Around same time in the late 80s. Ireland was a kip back then.
                            A look at The Commitments movie confirms that. But a great backdrop for the movie, and for photography also. Everything seems so bland about city landscapes nowadays.
                            "I don't believe in fairytales," O'Connell once told me, "even though it feels like I've been lucky enough to live through a few. However it ends, I'll feel lucky."
                            Donald McRae, Guardian Rugby, October 2015

                            Comment


                              #15
                              Originally posted by blackwarrior View Post
                              A look at The Commitments movie confirms that. But a great backdrop for the movie, and for photography also. Everything seems so bland about city landscapes nowadays.
                              I know what you mean but those photos give me shiver to be honest... I can feel the damp, smell the coal smog and think of things like my grandmother's outside toilet in Jewtown in Cork. I prefer today's environment!

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