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  • Waterfordlad
    replied
    Had tears in my eyes reading that. Brave, smart lady

    Leave a comment:


  • Piquet
    replied
    Brave woman. She's Fred's Granddaughter and Niall's Daughter.

    Leave a comment:


  • the plastic paddy
    replied
    Breaks your heart, all the best to her.

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  • McCloud
    replied
    Originally posted by Corcíoch View Post
    A friend of mine shared this Facebooks status update from one of the survivors of the Balcony Collapse . . .

    Inspirational words from this young lady . . . . .worth remembering when we are worrying about some of our first world problems.

    Clodagh Cogley

    Hey friends, just an update to let you guys know how I'm getting on (slowly catching up with the individual messages I promise!) The fall from the balcony left me with 2 collapsed lungs, a broken shoulder, a broken knee, 5 broken ribs and a broken spinal cord... Meaning the chances of me using my legs again are pretty bleak.
    Not the best odds but I'm moving to a great rehabilitation centre here in San Francisco for 2 months (it has dog therapy ��) and intend to give it everything I've got. Who knows maybe legs have been holding me back all these years and I'll realise my talent for wheelchair basketball
    The thing I'm taking from this tragedy is that life is short and I intend to honour those who died by living the happiest and most fulfilling life possible. Enjoy a good dance and the feeling of grass beneath your feet like it's the last time because in this crazy world you never know when it might be.


    Read that somewhere else but you have to admire that young ladies spirit. I wish her all the best on her quest.

    Leave a comment:


  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    A friend of mine shared this Facebooks status update from one of the survivors of the Balcony Collapse . . .

    Inspirational words from this young lady . . . . .worth remembering when we are worrying about some of our first world problems.

    Clodagh Cogley

    Hey friends, just an update to let you guys know how I'm getting on (slowly catching up with the individual messages I promise!) The fall from the balcony left me with 2 collapsed lungs, a broken shoulder, a broken knee, 5 broken ribs and a broken spinal cord... Meaning the chances of me using my legs again are pretty bleak.
    Not the best odds but I'm moving to a great rehabilitation centre here in San Francisco for 2 months (it has dog therapy ��) and intend to give it everything I've got. Who knows maybe legs have been holding me back all these years and I'll realise my talent for wheelchair basketball
    The thing I'm taking from this tragedy is that life is short and I intend to honour those who died by living the happiest and most fulfilling life possible. Enjoy a good dance and the feeling of grass beneath your feet like it's the last time because in this crazy world you never know when it might be.


    Leave a comment:


  • Old Dog
    replied
    Originally posted by Piquet View Post
    I have used this quote in another thread around the time of Remembrance Sunday.

    I think it's equally appropriate for this thread.

    "They shall not grow old as we that are left grow old
    Age shall not weary them not the years condemn
    At the going down of the sun and in the morning
    We will remember them."

    Forgive the pedantry, but it's not "condemn" but rather "contemn"

    Leave a comment:


  • diarm
    replied
    Originally posted by No. 16 View Post
    By the newspaper etc. The irony, (sad as it is in these circumstances) is that there is usually full accountability over there and there is often none here. You screw up over there in the slightest, you're going down. Make a competency based error, you're sacked and sued. I understand it's from shock and anger, but the one eyed, ill informed, sweeping generalisations on here are reminiscent of the ham fisted New York Times Journalist. Don't forget, negligent "cowboy building", as it is currently understood, is more of an Anglo/Irish thing. We're thoroughly surrounded by examples of it. It is not nearly as common there. This is such an awful tragedy. The totally baseless knee jerk commentary is ugly and unhelpful.
    That's fair enough. I'll just point out the my comment was very much in response to the newspaper article rather than the event itself. I meant to imply that if such an event happened to American students in Ireland, the first thought would be 'what was wrong with the building/who is at fault" but because they were Irish, it was "oh they must have been drunk and misbehaving". I could have made that clearer.

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  • Old Dog
    replied
    Originally posted by Jenta View Post
    Would you have gotten away with installing a wood beamed balcony with full access like that in Ireland? Genuine question. And of course I do mean without bribing your local fg/ff councillor because you'd probably get away with building it out of spit and cotton wool if you greased the right palm.
    Presumably news of the 2010 Planning and Development Act hasn't yet arrived on Planet Jenta. (Perhaps a fox intercepted the carrier pigeon.)

    Leave a comment:


  • treatycity1
    replied
    Originally posted by Piquet View Post
    These "Journalists" have obviously never heard of Spring Break.
    was witness to a spring break many years ago in Mexico, scuts and sluts, and they have the gall to criticize us,
    my deepest sympathies to all the victims and their families.

    Leave a comment:


  • Piquet
    replied
    I have used this quote in another thread around the time of Remembrance Sunday.

    I think it's equally appropriate for this thread.

    "They shall not grow old as we that are left grow old
    Age shall not weary them not the years contemn
    At the going down of the sun and in the morning
    We will remember them."
    Last edited by Piquet; 21st-June-2015, 17:38.

    Leave a comment:


  • Grandpasimpson
    replied
    It's being reported that the builder has paid out 3mill for previous balcony building transgressions

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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Originally posted by No. 16 View Post
    It's not the codes. The codes are exemplary and in line with international standards. The problem is with inspection and cutting corners. Of course this is hard for us to imagine as all buildings in Ireland are obviously thoroughly inspected and passed fit by a watertight regulatory body. That's why we don't have any examples of dangerous breeches of codes in Ireland, right?

    There are huge amounts of building codes in the US indeed. Especially in California where seismic activity is an issue.

    The Codes are so strict that they dictate exactly what fixings have to be used in timber frame assembly and do so based on shear testing. In those cases they dictate a particular type of Nails, as opposed to screws as the ones specified are shear tested.


    This tragedy may not be the fault of gross shoddy workmanship - it could have been a small enough mistake and leak that caused this wood rot over time. Maybe it wasn't the fault of workmanship at all but of the design being flawed from day 1 and the contractors did their best to build it well. Maybe it wasn't either and was a fault of building managers to notify residents of limits of persons to be on the balconies at any one time.

    Maybe it was none of the above and it was just an awful terrible accident.


    We don't know. Like No 16 says above, lets not behave exactly like the NY Times did and start throwing blame when we don't know what caused the failure.
    Last edited by Corcíoch; 19th-June-2015, 10:18.

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  • Arthur Guinness
    replied
    The son of a friend who was visiting the States fairly recently died there. With beauracracy and utter bull**** the Yanks went on with it took two weeks before the body could be brought home. Certainly hope these unfortunate families won't be put through the same crap. Yes,there are regulations but there's also humanity. I see the Mayor of Berkeley is already commenting on this.

    Leave a comment:


  • Jenta
    replied
    Originally posted by No. 16 View Post
    It's not the codes. The codes are exemplary and in line with international standards. The problem is with inspection and cutting corners. Of course this is hard for us to imagine as all buildings in Ireland are obviously thoroughly inspected and passed fit by a watertight regulatory body. That's why we don't have any examples of dangerous breeches of codes in Ireland, right?
    Would you have gotten away with installing a wood beamed balcony with full access like that in Ireland? Genuine question. And of course I do mean without bribing your local fg/ff councillor because you'd probably get away with building it out of spit and cotton wool if you greased the right palm.

    Leave a comment:


  • No. 16
    replied
    Originally posted by Jenta View Post
    Buildings Regs don't seem to exist on the same scale at all in the USA.

    I can just imagine the Republican backlash if you tried to regulate construction in a meaningful way. "Do you want a Government appointed, bureaucratic building inspector coming between you and your dream home?"
    It's not the codes. The codes are exemplary and in line with international standards. The problem is with inspection and cutting corners. Of course this is hard for us to imagine as all buildings in Ireland are obviously thoroughly inspected and passed fit by a watertight regulatory body. That's why we don't have any examples of dangerous breeches of codes in Ireland, right?

    Leave a comment:

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