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  • Hugged Rugger
    replied
    thanks, he picked out one in smyths catalogue but wont be getting that. Celestron not much more than it but much better by tthe looks of it
    Last edited by Hugged Rugger; 23rd-October-2019, 13:46.

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  • neill_m
    replied
    Originally posted by Hugged Rugger View Post
    any suggestions for a kids first telescope? I never had one so only just starting to read up on it but suggestions welcome
    https://www.stargazing.me.uk/whats-best-telescope-kids/

    https://telescopereviewer.com/top-7-...opes-for-kids/

    A couple of web sites to help out. Have seen through the Celestron 76mm Firstscope which you can put on a table etc (no tripod), decent beginner scope.

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  • Hugged Rugger
    replied
    any suggestions for a kids first telescope? I never had one so only just starting to read up on it but suggestions welcome

    Leave a comment:


  • neill_m
    replied
    October 2019 night sky guide: https://www.irishastronomy.org/kunen...d=42&id=101467

    And November's hot off the press!!: https://www.irishastronomy.org/kunen...d=42&id=101472

    Leave a comment:


  • FORWARD....
    replied
    Originally posted by neill_m View Post
    Not a vintage year for the Perseids. The 90+% waxing gibbous moon near Saturn was very bright last night (Full Moon on Thursday). Last night's moon didn't set until around 02:30 giving a 3 hour window to spot meteors, a year for the dedicated. Next year is a slight improvement with lunar interference again - a 38% waning crescent rises around 1am on the 13th but you would have until then to try and spot some meteors on the evening of the 12th.

    Last year was spectacular down in Ballinskelligs, Kerry. Down on the beach in the dark sky reserve, lovely clear skies and no moon interfering. Saw many meteors on the night.

    I write a free monthly guide to the night sky - September's can accessed via the link - https://www.irishastronomy.org/kunen...d=42&id=101452 August's is - https://www.irishastronomy.org/kunen...d=42&id=101446
    Page bookmarked.

    Thank you

    Leave a comment:


  • neill_m
    replied
    Not a vintage year for the Perseids. The 90+% waxing gibbous moon near Saturn was very bright last night (Full Moon on Thursday). Last night's moon didn't set until around 02:30 giving a 3 hour window to spot meteors, a year for the dedicated. Next year is a slight improvement with lunar interference again - a 38% waning crescent rises around 1am on the 13th but you would have until then to try and spot some meteors on the evening of the 12th.

    Last year was spectacular down in Ballinskelligs, Kerry. Down on the beach in the dark sky reserve, lovely clear skies and no moon interfering. Saw many meteors on the night.

    I write a free monthly guide to the night sky - September's can accessed via the link - https://www.irishastronomy.org/kunen...d=42&id=101452 August's is - https://www.irishastronomy.org/kunen...d=42&id=101446

    Leave a comment:


  • kahalui
    replied
    Originally posted by Waterfordlad View Post
    A display of celestial fireworks is set to peak late tonight as the Earth flies through a cloud of cometary dust.

    If skies are clear, the Perseid meteor shower should be visible from around midnight until 5.30am.

    The event is one of the highpoints in the celestial calendar, occurring each year as the Earth ploughs through dusty debris left by Comet Swift-Tuttle.

    The meteors, mostly no bigger than a grain of sand, burn up as they hit the atmosphere at 58 kilometres per second to produce a shooting stream of light in the sky.
    Funny you mention that. Am outside in the patio looking up at the moon...don't think I've ever seen it as bright.

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  • Waterfordlad
    replied
    A display of celestial fireworks is set to peak late tonight as the Earth flies through a cloud of cometary dust.

    If skies are clear, the Perseid meteor shower should be visible from around midnight until 5.30am.

    The event is one of the highpoints in the celestial calendar, occurring each year as the Earth ploughs through dusty debris left by Comet Swift-Tuttle.

    The meteors, mostly no bigger than a grain of sand, burn up as they hit the atmosphere at 58 kilometres per second to produce a shooting stream of light in the sky.

    Leave a comment:


  • Cougar Moon
    replied
    Click image for larger version

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    sorry about the delay....I blame herself. ;)

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  • ustix
    replied
    Originally posted by Cougar Moon View Post
    Have a look outside at the moon. It has a ring around it. I've never seen this before. Anyone know what it is?
    A 'moongarden' they call it in Sweden, literal translation, if it's the same effect of light.
    Big bright moon with up to a third of the sky in extreme, starlightless darkness, radiating out of it's epicentre. Visible frequently enough over the Emerald Isle.

    Leave a comment:


  • Boo-boo
    replied
    Originally posted by Cougar Moon View Post
    Have a look outside at the moon. It has a ring around it. I've never seen this before. Anyone know what it is?
    A moon featuring a ring...who'd have thought.

    Leave a comment:


  • mac22
    replied
    Saw it once in Portugal several years ago around the Sun

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  • Paddy Whac
    replied
    From Twitter

    SCP (@SeanCurtinPhoto) tweeted at 10:07 PM on Sun, Feb 01, 2015:
    An optical phenomenon by light interacting with ice crystals called a nimbus, icebow or gloriole seen in #Limerick. http://t.co/JaZ1mcCHqk

    Leave a comment:


  • Cougar Moon
    started a topic Tonight's Sky

    Tonight's Sky

    Have a look outside at the moon. It has a ring around it. I've never seen this before. Anyone know what it is?
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