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    Tonight's Sky

    Have a look outside at the moon. It has a ring around it. I've never seen this before. Anyone know what it is?
    So I walked as day was dawning
    Where small birds sang and leaves were falling
    Where we once watched the row boats landing
    By the broad majestic shannon

    #2
    From Twitter

    SCP (@SeanCurtinPhoto) tweeted at 10:07 PM on Sun, Feb 01, 2015:
    An optical phenomenon by light interacting with ice crystals called a nimbus, icebow or gloriole seen in #Limerick. http://t.co/JaZ1mcCHqk

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      #3
      Saw it once in Portugal several years ago around the Sun

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        #4
        Originally posted by Cougar Moon View Post
        Have a look outside at the moon. It has a ring around it. I've never seen this before. Anyone know what it is?
        A moon featuring a ring...who'd have thought.
        Tic-Toc. POC and DOC. Stop the clock.

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          #5
          Originally posted by Cougar Moon View Post
          Have a look outside at the moon. It has a ring around it. I've never seen this before. Anyone know what it is?
          A 'moongarden' they call it in Sweden, literal translation, if it's the same effect of light.
          Big bright moon with up to a third of the sky in extreme, starlightless darkness, radiating out of it's epicentre. Visible frequently enough over the Emerald Isle.
          Gwan Joe!!

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            #6
            Click image for larger version

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            sorry about the delay....I blame herself.
            So I walked as day was dawning
            Where small birds sang and leaves were falling
            Where we once watched the row boats landing
            By the broad majestic shannon

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              #7
              A display of celestial fireworks is set to peak late tonight as the Earth flies through a cloud of cometary dust.

              If skies are clear, the Perseid meteor shower should be visible from around midnight until 5.30am.

              The event is one of the highpoints in the celestial calendar, occurring each year as the Earth ploughs through dusty debris left by Comet Swift-Tuttle.

              The meteors, mostly no bigger than a grain of sand, burn up as they hit the atmosphere at 58 kilometres per second to produce a shooting stream of light in the sky.
              "There are a lot of points that we’ve left behind and this is with a young group. That probably tells you what they’re capable of and that they’re a very good side.

              Probably next year or the year after next they will take some stopping"

              Anthony Foley, May 2016. Axel RIP

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                #8
                Originally posted by Waterfordlad View Post
                A display of celestial fireworks is set to peak late tonight as the Earth flies through a cloud of cometary dust.

                If skies are clear, the Perseid meteor shower should be visible from around midnight until 5.30am.

                The event is one of the highpoints in the celestial calendar, occurring each year as the Earth ploughs through dusty debris left by Comet Swift-Tuttle.

                The meteors, mostly no bigger than a grain of sand, burn up as they hit the atmosphere at 58 kilometres per second to produce a shooting stream of light in the sky.
                Funny you mention that. Am outside in the patio looking up at the moon...don't think I've ever seen it as bright.

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                  #9
                  Not a vintage year for the Perseids. The 90+% waxing gibbous moon near Saturn was very bright last night (Full Moon on Thursday). Last night's moon didn't set until around 02:30 giving a 3 hour window to spot meteors, a year for the dedicated. Next year is a slight improvement with lunar interference again - a 38% waning crescent rises around 1am on the 13th but you would have until then to try and spot some meteors on the evening of the 12th.

                  Last year was spectacular down in Ballinskelligs, Kerry. Down on the beach in the dark sky reserve, lovely clear skies and no moon interfering. Saw many meteors on the night.

                  I write a free monthly guide to the night sky - September's can accessed via the link - https://www.irishastronomy.org/kunen...d=42&id=101452 August's is - https://www.irishastronomy.org/kunen...d=42&id=101446

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                    #10
                    Originally posted by neill_m View Post
                    Not a vintage year for the Perseids. The 90+% waxing gibbous moon near Saturn was very bright last night (Full Moon on Thursday). Last night's moon didn't set until around 02:30 giving a 3 hour window to spot meteors, a year for the dedicated. Next year is a slight improvement with lunar interference again - a 38% waning crescent rises around 1am on the 13th but you would have until then to try and spot some meteors on the evening of the 12th.

                    Last year was spectacular down in Ballinskelligs, Kerry. Down on the beach in the dark sky reserve, lovely clear skies and no moon interfering. Saw many meteors on the night.

                    I write a free monthly guide to the night sky - September's can accessed via the link - https://www.irishastronomy.org/kunen...d=42&id=101452 August's is - https://www.irishastronomy.org/kunen...d=42&id=101446
                    Page bookmarked.

                    Thank you
                    Has Fineen put Johnny down yet?

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