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Spotlight docu: young rape victim persistently interrogated & intimidated by IRA

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    Spotlight docu: young rape victim persistently interrogated & intimidated by IRA

    Glad this is finally coming out into the open. Fair play to Máirí Cahill.
    Last edited by mr chips; 20th-October-2014, 10:43. Reason: edited title to clarify subject of thread
    Tis but a scratch.

    #2
    Any hints for those of us not in EU right now?
    "There are a lot of points that we’ve left behind and this is with a young group. That probably tells you what they’re capable of and that they’re a very good side.

    Probably next year or the year after next they will take some stopping"

    Anthony Foley, May 2016. Axel RIP

    Comment


      #3
      Sorry, the programme was just starting as I posted and I didn't want to miss it. A girl from West Belfast called Máirí Cahill, who is now an adult, alleges she was raped as a teenager by a member of the IRA. She waived her right to anonymity in order to name and shame the perpetrator. She also talked in detail about how after disclosing this to a female acquaintance she thought she could trust, her confidence was betrayed and she ended up having to defend herself in a kangaroo court scenario, as a teenager. She was subjected to multiple interrogations, including one where she was brought face to face in a room with the alleged perpetrator (still as a teenager, on her own and without her parents' knowledge) as part of the IRA's "investigation". They told her they were going to "watch her body language" to determine whether or not she was lying, while her alleged rapist harangued and verbally abused her ...

      Very high-profile figures within the republican movement were involved in all this pretty much from the outset. They repeatedly intimidated her and her family when they wanted to go to the police. At one stage she was told that the IRA had the guy under "house arrest", but that if she did insist on going to the police they would have to "release" him and what would she do if he met her in the street or was round at her house within the hour? Adams himself became involved, and her account of his meeting with her helps to show him for the maggot he really is. That f*cker got off lightly in terms of what was broadcast though.

      She also spoke of how when she was finally able to bring herself to report it to the PSNI, still in the face of being threatened, the police and prosecutors let the case drag on for four years and failed to pursue it properly. I know that some distasteful, shameful opportunism on the part of the authorities arose out of this but this aspect wasn't explored on the programme, so I won't go into detail about all that other than to say that the notion of the victim being the priority is laughable. She has now withdrawn her evidence and launched a formal complaint with the police ombudsman.

      There's a lot more to all this than what was specified in last night's programme, and more grubby details may eventually come to light if the powers that be don't prevent it. Suffice to say that an awful lot gets washed under the carpet for the sake of political expediency. I am simply filled with admiration for her courage and fortitude in the face of betrayal from people she thought she could trust and genuine fear for her safety.
      Tis but a scratch.

      Comment


        #4
        24 per cent in the polls
        My computer thinks I'm gay
        What's the difference anyway
        When all the people do all day
        Is stare into a phone

        Comment


          #5
          Some people are blind to what SF actually represent.

          Comment


            #6
            Originally posted by mr chips View Post
            Suffice to say that an awful lot gets washed under the carpet for the sake of political expediency.
            I can understand that in relation to "wartime" matters but this is not one of those matters and should have the full force of the law of the land applied to the case political ramifications or otherwise.
            "Everything good about Ireland can be found in County Cork"....Lonely Planet Guide 2012

            Comment


              #7
              SF don't believe the law of the land is legitimate.

              Comment


                #8
                Originally posted by Grandpasimpson View Post
                I can understand that in relation to "wartime" matters but this is not one of those matters and should have the full force of the law of the land applied to the case political ramifications or otherwise.
                I agree. The allusions made in the programme to the sort of mindset present in the Northern Ireland Office were quite disgusting. From what I know of the whole sorry mess, the conduct of the PSNI in particular was nothing short of shameful.

                As an aside, for all that I have nothing but contempt for the likes of Adams, I don't think it's accurate to say things like "SF don't believe the law of the land is legitimate". A large cohort of individuals has joined the party in a post-conflict era and here in the north at least, they represent some of the more socially progressive attitudes. Whether they have what it takes to shape the future away from the gangsters remains to be seen - I wouldn't necessarily describe myself as optimistic, but there isn't as much cause for pessimism as there once was.

                But that's a separate discussion.
                Tis but a scratch.

                Comment


                  #9
                  Surprise surprise ...
                  Gerry Adams 'refutes' Maíria Cahill Spotlight meeting claim


                  Maíria Cahill waived her right to anonymity to speak to the BBC's Spotlight programme


                  Related Stories




                  Sinn Féin President Gerry Adams has said he "totally refutes" allegations about a meeting he had with a woman who claims the IRA forced her to confront her alleged rapist.

                  Maíria Cahill said she was raped as a teenager and was later interrogated by the IRA about her rape claim.
                  The man she accused, Martin Morris, has consistently denied her claims and was acquitted of all charges.
                  Mr Adams said he had "met Maíria in good faith".
                  'Concerned' The Belfast woman is a member of one of the republican movement's best-known families.
                  Her great uncle, Joe Cahill, was one of the founders of the Provisional IRA and a long-time associate of Mr Adams.

                  Mairia Cahill detailed several meetings she said she had with Gerry Adams about her abuse allegations


                  In the programme, Ms Cahill detailed the first of several meetings she had with Mr Adams about her abuse allegations.
                  Mr Adams said on Wednesday that the meeting was held "at the behest of her cousin and my late friend Siobhan O'Hanlon, who was concerned for Maria's welfare".
                  "When I learned of the allegation of abuse from Siobhan, she told me that Mairia was refusing to go to the RUC," he said in a statement.
                  "Siobhan and I met with Joe Cahill who was Mairia's uncle. We told Joe of the allegation and asked him to speak to Mairia about reporting this to the RUC. He did so. Mairia did not want to do this at that time.
                  "I have contacted my solicitor with regard to the allegations made against me in the Spotlight programme."



                  Martin Morris has consistently denied being an abuser


                  Ms Cahill waived her right to anonymity to speak to BBC Northern Ireland's Spotlight programme, broadcast on Tuesday night.
                  'Face-to-face meeting' Ms Cahill said that in 1997, when she was 16, she was subjected to a 12-month cycle of sexual abuse, including rape, by a man who was believed to be a member of the IRA.
                  Ms Cahill described how the IRA questioned her repeatedly, often several nights a week, for months about the abuse allegations, before summoning her to a meeting with her alleged abuser in early 2000.
                  In the programme, Ms Cahill outlined a meeting with Mr Adams where she raised her allegations.
                  "The most disturbing thing of that conversation for me was then he said: 'Well, you know Maria, abusers can be extremely manipulative.'
                  "And you know, he kind of put his hand on his chin and he sat forward a wee bit, and he said: 'Sometimes they're that manipulative', that the people who have been abused actually enjoy it.
                  "I was absolutely horrified. And I, at that point, got very, very angry and said to him: 'Well I didn't enjoy it'.
                  "And at that the meeting was over for me, there was no point.

                  "He apologised on behalf of the republican movement for what had happened to me."



                  Joe Cahill was one of the founders of the Provisional IRA


                  Two of those Ms Cahill identified in the programme as having led the IRA internal inquiry into the allegations are well-known figures.
                  Padraic Wilson was once the leader of the IRA in the Maze Prison, and is now considered a supporter of the peace process.
                  Seamus Finucane is a brother of the solicitor Pat Finucane, who was shot dead by loyalists.
                  Ms Cahill later went to the police, and a case was brought against the alleged rapist and those said to have been involved in the IRA inquiry.
                  All charges were dropped, and the accused rapist was acquitted after Marie Cahill withdrew her evidence.
                  Tis but a scratch.

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Men with guns raped women in NIreland and elsewhere on the island. Of that there is little doubt. When those women reported it to the British or Irish authorities, the authorities' main interest was in the fact that the perp had a gun, and not the rape.

                    For many women in nationalist areas it was simply impossible to go to the RUC for obvious reasons, and most loyalist paramilitaries appear to have been working for the RUC in any case. So there was very little hope of seeing justice done.

                    Rape is still massively underreported in Ireland, of those that are reported most don't ever make it to court and of those that do there are few convictions. Of those convictions many perps will get a fine, or suspended sentence.

                    The guns have gone but all the attitudes of those in the police and justice system remain and our society is still far too tolerant of rape.

                    Would this case have got any attention at all of Gerry Adams was not implicated in some way? Of course not.
                    Munster – Champions of Europe 2006, 2008, 2019.

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Ah yes. Of course we can believe Gerry 'I was never in the IRA' Adams.

                      Comment


                        #12
                        Thing is, at the time this started to snowball she was still in her teens and hadn't gotten to the place where she was ready to do something more formal about it - it only came out in the first place because a person she confided in let her down. But she would have been going to the police far, far earlier were it not for the intimidation and constant pressure to which she was subjected - this included demands to know exactly what she was saying in counselling sessions, FFS. As I said, I won't go into specifics about what happened when she finally did report it to the police but the approach was certainly not along the lines of "let's do everything we can to help this girl".

                        Interestingly, when her uncle Joe Cahill finally did learn of it himself, he was adamant that she should go to the police. This from a man who was one of the founding members of the Provisional IRA. Adams' spin on it as quoted above, implying that Joe Cahill had to be persuaded to encourage her to do so, is a grotesque distortion of what actually happened.
                        Tis but a scratch.

                        Comment


                          #13
                          Not casting assumptions on anyone here, but of all the directions this lady could with this, why to Micheal Martin and Fianna Fáil? The optics of that are terrible and undermine the legitimacy of her story.
                          "There are probably more annoying things than being hectored about African development by a wealthy Irish rock star in a cowboy hat, but I can't think of one at the moment"

                          Paul Theroux

                          Comment


                            #14
                            Originally posted by rathbaner View Post
                            Men with guns raped women in NIreland and elsewhere on the island. Of that there is little doubt. When those women reported it to the British or Irish authorities, the authorities' main interest was in the fact that the perp had a gun, and not the rape.

                            For many women in nationalist areas it was simply impossible to go to the RUC for obvious reasons, and most loyalist paramilitaries appear to have been working for the RUC in any case. So there was very little hope of seeing justice done.

                            Rape is still massively underreported in Ireland, of those that are reported most don't ever make it to court and of those that do there are few convictions. Of those convictions many perps will get a fine, or suspended sentence.

                            The guns have gone but all the attitudes of those in the police and justice system remain and our society is still far too tolerant of rape.

                            Would this case have got any attention at all of Gerry Adams was not implicated in some way? Of course not.
                            Not true, actually. Conviction in rape cases for rape is about 73%, conviction for an offence is 88% - page 52 and 53 - https://www.dppireland.ie/filestore/..._[eng].pdf Almost invariably custodial sentence.
                            Last edited by Thomond78; 17th-October-2014, 07:47.
                            Ceterum censeo INM irrumandum esse.

                            Comment


                              #15
                              Originally posted by Thomond78 View Post
                              Not true, actually. Conviction in rape cases for rape is about 73%, conviction for an offence is 88% - page 52 and 53 - https://www.dppireland.ie/filestore/documents/AR_2013_[eng].pdf Almost invariably custodial sentence.
                              Hmmm, disingenuous at best. Removing those who do not contest the case when charged - ie caught red handed or where there is overwhelming evidence and they plead gulity - we find that in 2013, of 205 contested cases just 35 were convicted, and 155 acquitted, and the jury was unable to bring in a verdict in 15 cases.

                              RCCs have reported again and again that the working of the legal system is heavily weighted against rape victims. Even those who do not "try it on".
                              Munster – Champions of Europe 2006, 2008, 2019.

                              Comment

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