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The latest Catholic Church Massacre

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    The latest Catholic Church Massacre

    Originally posted by Balla Boy View Post
    Another day, another case of rampant institutionalised abuse...

    http://www.theguardian.com/uk-news/2...-homes-inquiry
    May as well put this here. I'm sure others have been reading about it already but seeing as it's in the headlines ...

    http://www.irishtimes.com/news/socia...home-1.1819188 Call for inquiry into deaths at Tuam mother-and-baby home

    Inaction on issue ‘simply not an option for us in Government’ says junior minister Ciaran Cannon


    Archbishop of Dublin Diarmuid Martin said that “if a public or state inquiry is not established into outstanding issues of concern surrounding the mother-and-baby homes, then it is important that a social history project be undertaken to get an accurate picture of these homes in our country’s history”. File photograph: Eric Luke/The Irish Times

    Wed, Jun 4, 2014, 00:10
    First published: Tue, Jun 3, 2014, 20:09

    The Tuam mother-and-baby home scandal has led to a call for “an urgent inquiry, including a Garda investigation, into the circumstances surrounding the unexplained deaths of a large number of children” there.
    Making the call, Minister of State at the Department of Education, East Galway TD Ciaran Cannon said he had spoken to Minister for Justice Frances FitzGerald and Minister for Children Charlie Flanagan on the matter.
    “They have both indicated that they will be meeting with their officials this week and have suggested that a cross-departmental approach will be required to determine what is the best way to move forward on this issue. Doing nothing is simply not an option for us in Government when presented with details of this nature,” he said.

    Archbishop of Dublin Diarmuid Martin said that “if a public or state inquiry is not established into outstanding issues of concern surrounding the mother-and-baby homes, then it is important that a social history project be undertaken to get an accurate picture of these homes in our country’s history”.
    Archbishop Martin also said that “where there are reasonable grounds” he supports “excavating what may be unmarked graves” and “the setting up of monuments at any unmarked grave sites with, where possible, the names of those who died”.
    Following research by a local Tuam historian Catherine Corless into the operation of the mother-and-baby home run by the Sisters of Bon Secours congregations there, it emerged that up to 796 children may have died at the home during the period of its operation from 1925 to 1961.
    Records at Galway County Council list a very large number of deaths occurring at the home. Details are also emerging of the discovery in the 1970s of a large number of unidentified remains in a water tank close to the home, leading some to conclude that deceased children were disposed of in the tank without a proper burial or any records being kept on their interment.
    Mr Cannon said: “This is turning into a horrific account of maltreatment, neglect and a complete abdication of responsibility for the care of these very vulnerable young children. With each passing day more and more questions emerge - questions which cannot be ignored and need to be answered.”
    Representatives of the Sisters of Bon Secours in Ireland are to meet Archbishop of Tuam Michael Neary to discuss how best to honour all who died in the home.
    Tis but a scratch.

    #2
    Oh, and just as an extra kicker -
    http://www.broadsheet.ie/2014/06/03/...ord-the-truth/
    You Can’t Afford The Truth

    Bodger at 9:50 pm June 3, 2014

    33

    There’s a very real #FOI issue within the whole #tuambabies horror; Catherone Corless was charged INDIVIDUALLY for the 796 death records.
    — Colin O’Hara (@colinpohara) June 3, 2014

    Tis but a scratch.

    Comment


      #3
      It's mind boggling and sick.
      I live in Tuam and it's not nice to think there was a mass grave not far from where we live.
      Life is good

      Comment


        #4
        Archbishop of Dublin Diarmuid Martin said that “if a public or state inquiry is not established into outstanding issues of concern surrounding the mother-and-baby homes, then it is important that a social history project be undertaken to get an accurate picture of these homes in our country’s history”.
        A social history project?

        FFS.
        Please support Milford Hospice. Click here to donate.

        Comment


          #5
          By the way, while the article above uses the phrase "water tank", any other article I've read about this states that the bodies of the children and babies were actually thrown into a septic tank.

          Just take a moment to reflect on that.
          Tis but a scratch.

          Comment


            #6
            Originally posted by mr chips View Post
            By the way, while the article above uses the phrase "water tank", any other article I've read about this states that the bodies of the children and babies were actually thrown into a septic tank.

            Just take a moment to reflect on that.
            It would make a good social history project.
            Please support Milford Hospice. Click here to donate.

            Comment


              #7
              The story is possibly the greatest indictment of the state, the church and us as a society that has been leveled thus far. The sheer indifference, the contempt, bordering on hatred with which society and more importantly the clergy, dished out to innocent children extended even beyond death just blows my mind.

              Mortality rates running at 50% in the 1930's in mother and child 'homes' was more like the 1600's and three times the national average of the day. So they were all entombed, 800 babies and children, stacked up in a concrete septic pit where the evidence lies, undisturbed to this day.

              Children died from measles, polio and other ailments but as many again or more died from neglect and malnutrition.

              The fact that all this happened before even I was born, is irrelevant. We will never understand the deeply scarred and fcuked-up national psyche we inherited from the famine if we don't investigate this outrage like the UN do in Bosnia and Rwanda.

              A truly civilized country (i.e. one that cherishes all its children) would surely, even at this remove, forensically investigate the site of a mass grave, count the numbers, see if the numbers match the cert., etc.

              But then again, we are not one of those civilized countries, are we? God knows how many more such mass graves there are in this excuse of a country.
              Last edited by NiallGK; 5th-June-2014, 00:58.
              If your religion is worth killing for, please start with yourself.

              Comment


                #8
                There is a lot of reading here for those of you interested in some background.

                https://storify.com/Limerick1914/chi...am-1920s-1960s
                Please support Milford Hospice. Click here to donate.

                Comment


                  #9
                  Life is good

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Some pretty horrible attitudes encapsulated in those articles fitzy. Gives a real insight into the complete and utter indoctrination of societal attitudes by the church, and the complicity of public authorities as they sought to wash their hands of the grubby little problem.

                    "Unmarried mothers should, in our opinion, be provided for in special institutions under religious or philanthropic management, their infants being kept with them until weaned."

                    "Paying patients in the county hospital had a decided objection to being placed in the same wards with unmarried mothers sent from the County Home and elsewhere."

                    "... an order was made asking the Board of Health to provide accommodation for (unmarried mothers) in Tuam at the least possible expense."

                    "Indiscipline by unmarried mothers in the County Home was reported by the Matron ... These girls had been giving a lot of trouble, refused to obey orders and to work. She suggested that they be transferred to the Magdalen Home, Galway."

                    "The Secretary reported that since last month eleven unmarried mothers had been admitted to the hospital. -Chairman: That is a terrible condition of affairs. We thought it was bad when we used have three or four in the month. We appear to have reached a great depth of evil."
                    (Yes indeed, albeit I imagine not in the way the Chairman meant.)

                    Other salient quotes have already been picked out on the page. It's an incredibly depressing portrait of the almost unconsciously savage attitudes that were prevalent in Ireland right through to the 1980s and even into the 90s.

                    EDIT
                    Just read a bit further into that link and found the following, dating back to 1937:
                    "A petition was read, signed by a number of residents at Tubberjarlath, Tuam, calling for the removal of the cesspool at the back of the Children’s Home, Tuam, and in close proximity to a large number of houses occupied by the tenants of the Town Commissioners’ houses. The petitioners’ letters stated that the smell from the cesspool was intolerable and highly dangerous to the health of a large number of residents and their families in the locality ..."
                    Tis but a scratch.

                    Comment


                      #11
                      The death rate for kids there was 30%, they then dumped the bodies into a septic tank. This is the cover of the washington post and most irish people are still turning a blind eye
                      My computer thinks I'm gay
                      What's the difference anyway
                      When all the people do all day
                      Is stare into a phone

                      Comment


                        #12
                        We have proven ourselves time and again since the beginning of the state to be a despicable race utterly incapable of looking after ourselves. This is sickening beyond belief and the truly horrific thing is i dont for a second believe this is the one and only case. It's interesting that NiallGK mentions Rwanda because that was exactly the country we were discussing here in the office a few minutes ago.

                        We (or should I say some) hold Dev (and FF) up as this great leader, that pr1ck stood as head of government through an absolutely appalling regime where women and children were systematically abused and killed over the course of decades. I am truly ashamed to be associated with the same country in which this happened.
                        "Everything good about Ireland can be found in County Cork"....Lonely Planet Guide 2012

                        Comment


                          #13
                          Did you hear Neary's, comment about how terrible it was for the mothers to lose their children, especially as they had already been ostracised by their families??? Actually here it is link

                          And here's the comment:

                          I can only begin to imagine the huge emotional wrench which the mothers suffered in giving up their babies for adoption or by witnessing their death. Many of these young vulnerable women would already have been rejected by their families. The pain and brokenness which they endured is beyond our capacity to understand. It is simply too difficult to comprehend their helplessness and suffering as they watched their beloved child die.

                          Ah - hello!! And why were they rejected by the families?? Because the all-powerful RCC mandated it so!!! Those fukers need to be taken out and horse-whipped!!
                          The reasonable man adapts himself to the world; the unreasonable one persists in trying to adapt the world to himself. Therefore all progress depends on the unreasonable man - George Bernard Shaw


                          Comment


                            #14
                            BBC Radio Foyle interview with Catherine Corless (got the link from the site fitzy posted above).

                            http://t.co/2MOpCE2Lp4

                            Some items from that interview which stood out for me:

                            At all times there were at least 100 mothers and up to 200 children in the home. The worst decade for deaths in Tuam was the 1940s, with 60 deaths in 1944.

                            There was very little medical care, with one doctor on hand for all the children and mothers. Children died of measles, gastroenteritis, pneumonia etc. Children from the home were even segregated in the classroom at school, it seems - kept to one side of the classroom and not allowed to mix with the other children.

                            A local couple who moved into the area looked after the spot out of the kindness of their own heart - built a small grotto out of their own pocket and kept it neat & tidy. But for their efforts over the last thirty years the place would be a wilderness.

                            When asked why couldn’t young women on most occasions go in, have their baby and go home, Ms Corless explained that nuns would charge for £100 for the woman’s confinement. She said that she'd spoken to one mother who went in to have her baby and came out again with the child more or less straight away, but said that this would have been a one in a thousand. State support though (for the vast majority who did go in and accept their fate) was £1 a head - she wasn't sure was this per day/week/once-off payment.

                            For anyone who thinks they may have had a relative in the Tuam home, she has been able to re-unite some families and is happy to try and help them find out any information that might be available. Her facebook page is Mother-Baby Home Research Tuam (don’t know if that’s hyphenated, all one word or what). She is doing all this voluntarily.
                            Tis but a scratch.

                            Comment


                              #15
                              There's a synopsis of Catherine Corless's FB page here -
                              http://freethoughtblogs.com/butterfl...therbaby-home/

                              My knowledge of Irish history isn't great and my Father-in-law was a great supporter of 'Dev'.
                              Yet the more I read, the more I tend to agree with Grandpasimpson.
                              english by birth

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