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    Water softener

    Was thinking about ordering a water softener from these guy's.
    http://www.ewtechnologies.ie/
    Anyone have any experience or any dealing's with them.
    They have a fantastic offer at the moment for €649 supplied and installed.
    Every artist is a cannibal, every poet is a thief, they kill for inspiration then sing about their grief...

    #2
    http://www.ewtechnologies.ie/as-seen-on-tv
    Every artist is a cannibal, every poet is a thief, they kill for inspiration then sing about their grief...

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      #3
      Never heard of them kc but it seems very standard kit. What exactly are they offering for €649? What you need does also depend what type of supply you are on of course.

      Two things I would say savings are at best hopeful, actually very hopeful. Also if the bit of kit involves RO and you are on council mains you will lose approximately 50% of the water processed straight down the drain worth bearing in mind when charges come in. A simple carbon filter after softening does as good a job with no waste.
      I am one of the 5 clowns woo hoo

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        #4
        Thanks for the reply donc.
        I have my own well so charges won't be an issue.
        All i need really is something effective enough to rid me of the limescale.
        I know a plumber and he said it sounds very very reasonable.
        I'm just afraid if somethings sounds too good to be true that it probably is!
        Every artist is a cannibal, every poet is a thief, they kill for inspiration then sing about their grief...

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          #5
          Well if you have your own well there should be no need for anything other than softening. If the softener is going in a pump house make sure it can meet the water flow you need. Also always leave 1 tap plumbed from before the softener i.e. still hard water.

          if you have hard water you definitely need a softener for sure but do check out the flow rates first as those types are generally for under the counter to meet the demands from a council mains supply. I have one fairly similar where I live now and we are on the mains previously when we lived in the sticks we had a different type basically a larger vessel and bigger brine tank to service the well. Softening is basically ion exchange on resins don't forget so contact time is critical.
          I am one of the 5 clowns woo hoo

          Comment


            #6
            Interesting thread this. We're also on our own well & have hard water. Guy from Southern pumps suggested getting the water tested & applying the required filters if any. Why did you suggest leaving one unplumbed Donc (I'm just curious) Could that be say the outside tap?
            Con Artist

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              #7
              In a very small amount of cases for some people (very small perhaps in infant feed or elderly with certain illnesses but rare) softened water may not be suitable to drink. That being the case Val if you have a sink in the utility room maybe that would be the one to leave untreated perhaps but certainly the outside tap would be fine if it is easier from a plumbing aspect, it is not as if you would be using hundreds of liters from it. Other than that softened water is better just about everywhere in the house, if you are looking at further filtration I would only do it on the drinking water tap as it will bring nothing other than expense to the table. I put an RO in under the kitchen sink because I think Nenagh Town Council bought a mega job lot of chlorine and it can sometimes be like drinking a swimming pool. From domestic RO units the water generation is slow and the water really has to be softened otherwise the membranes will foul quickly. I done that because I wanted to make sure we would have decent drinking water but it really is slow and quite wasteful. When we got the new fridge freezer we plumbed soft water to it and just ran it through a standard 10" carbon filter and this works fine for chlorine removal so when the RO dies which I expect soon this will be replaced with a standard carbon filter as well.

              Just as an aside do look at your appliances as well, I have a Siemens dishwasher and it has to have salt to operate, so if the salt light comes on after a period of time things happen apparently (never put this to the test now I have to say). But running water through a softener twice can cause some foaming problems in such appliances as a result I have my dishwater on the mains untreated loop as well just in case.
              I am one of the 5 clowns woo hoo

              Comment


                #8
                Originally posted by kc73 View Post
                Thanks for the reply donc.
                I have my own well so charges won't be an issue.
                All i need really is something effective enough to rid me of the limescale.
                I know a plumber and he said it sounds very very reasonable.
                I'm just afraid if somethings sounds too good to be true that it probably is!
                Hey KC, I got this crowd in about a year and a half ago. I paid the €649, and I also paid a bit extra for a "reverse-osmosis" filter for the kitchen sink, so that it would take all the salt out of the water also (Baby bottles etc etc).
                Never had a complaint with them, and it is a good deal.

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                  #9
                  Had a chat with one of my suppliers €649 is neither cheap nor expensive for an installed price so as Bitter has experience of the company and from a cost point of view in the middle of the ball park seems OK.
                  I am one of the 5 clowns woo hoo

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Originally posted by kc73 View Post
                    Thanks for the reply donc.
                    I have my own well so charges won't be an issue.
                    All i need really is something effective enough to rid me of the limescale.
                    I know a plumber and he said it sounds very very reasonable.
                    I'm just afraid if somethings sounds too good to be true that it probably is!
                    Caveat Emptor KC.

                    A water softener will make a big difference to the water quality in your household if you just have limescale in your well water supply. If you have any iron, manganese, ammonium, odours, silt, bacteria present as contaminants amongst others, additional treatments will be required. Start by analysing the water in a reputable lab, and then build the purification system around what you actually need to remove.

                    In order to work correctly a softener must be sized for the hardness content of the water, expected worst case daily water usage (based on maximum occupancy) and the peak flow rate (especially in direct pressurisation plumbing systems). Don’t make the mistake of assuming one size fits all.

                    Depending on your water usage you may wish to have a water softener with a timer controlled backwashing control valve or a meter based unit. The former cleans the system out based on a time interval (it is set up based on expected {average or worst case} water usage in the household), while the latter only regenerates (cleans itself out) after a set volume of water has passed through the system (and hence is more efficient in terms of salt and water usage, especially during periods of low water usage).

                    Water softening exchanges sodium (or potassium) into the water in exchange for the Calcium and Magnesium ions that are present in scale forming compounds. The amount of sodium that is added is proportional to the hardness present in the untreated water. A reverse osmosis system can be added to further purify the softened water. It will remove sodium from of the softened water. Leaving a single tap untreated for hard drinking purposes is only advisable when you know there aren’t any other contaminants in the water apart from limescale, and this approach will leave kettles, sinks etc. covered in limescale. Carbon filters mentioned above by another poster won’t address sodium removal.

                    The company you refer to use Chinese control valve called a Canature re-badged as a Japanese brand Maruyama. It’s by far and away the cheapest equipment on the market, but like most things in life, you get what you pay for. There’s a reason they’re cheap. Think of the lada jokes of yesteryear and you’ll get a feel for how they are viewed in the in industry (and a Lada only ever flooded a driveway / garage...). Getting spares is a problem. The installations I’ve seen from that particular company aren’t done to Water Quality Association standards, and I’ve watched insurance companies wash their hands when things go pear shaped. Honest advice is to stick with Autotrol or Clack equipment, or Fleck at a push, installed by a reputable company that know the equipment inside out, but avoid the Chinese stuff.

                    Take the savings figures, “award winning” and infomercial channel “as seen on tv” references on that particular website with a large grain of water softening salt.

                    Caveat Emptor KC, but you kinda suspected it sounded a bit too good to be true.

                    PM me if you want any pointers on reputable labs for testing, good installers and specs of equipment that people in the know would put in their own house.
                    Last edited by Light Buzzyear; 24th-July-2013, 10:30.
                    To Infinity, Marseille & Beyond...via the winding Brive, Toulousse, Murrayfield, Stade de France, Vicarage Road, da Stooap, Montpellier, Sale route...it'll all be worth it one of these days.

                    Der is an isle

                    Comment


                      #11
                      TBH I would only use RO at home if absolutely required as it really takes all taste from the water and is very wasteful from an energy and water point of view (which is fine if you are on a well). If you live in a town and are on a chlorinated supply and you want to remove the chlorine taste then carbon filtration is fine and ongoing will save a lot of money through waste when metering come in.

                      As buzz says if you have iron present (common enough) your equipment will get much more expensive. I would suggest that it is always preferable to leave one tap untreated, these units can malfunction which can leave you with at worst no water and at best perhaps salty water coming through your pipes. Now showering in salty water or flushing toilets is OK (apart from obvious corrosion issues associated with chloride) but of course you are not going to drink that. I would only use water from an untreated tap for boiling in kettles etc if absolutely necessary as this will lead to limescale deposits in any equipment used, that may not have been clear. But best practice will always have one untreated supply readily available.

                      The water may become salty if the backwash / regeneration phase messes up. What happens here simply is brine (saturated sodium chloride solution) is passed through your resin. As buzz says when softening resin removes calcium, magnesium and some other metal cations from the water but after a while the resin will become exhausted so in turn this has to be removed from the resin and it recharged with sodium or potassium ions for further softening. After this happens water flushes out the resin to make sure only clean not salty water goes forward. Problems are rare enough but not unknown and should a cam stick then the water will be very salty.

                      This is very old well known technology it works well providing the kit is ok and as myself and buzz mentioned you get your flow rates right (and oversizing is as bad as undersizing as you can create channels in your resin bed meaning you do not get to utilise all of your resin meaning hard water will break through) it will work a treat. But if you have hard water do put one in you will see the difference.
                      I am one of the 5 clowns woo hoo

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                        #12
                        I've a bit to think about so.
                        I will ring them tomorrow to discuss some of the above issues with them and see what kind of guarantee's they have in place etc..
                        Every artist is a cannibal, every poet is a thief, they kill for inspiration then sing about their grief...

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                          #13
                          Has anybody got opinion on this method for treating water?
                          "You clearly don't know who you're talking to, so let me clue you in.
                          I am not in danger, Skyler. I am the danger.
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                            #14
                            Originally posted by kc73 View Post
                            I've a bit to think about so.
                            I will ring them tomorrow to discuss some of the above issues with them and see what kind of guarantee's they have in place etc..
                            We have a simple water tap filter. They supply the tap ans swap out filter every 6 months. We have used EW technologies for 8 years maybe. We have never had a bother. They ring to arrange times and have never been late. Always fast and courteous. We once had a leak and they had someone out to us that afternoon. Still with them and still happy.
                            Tic-Toc. POC and DOC. Stop the clock.

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                              #15
                              I got an offer today for a package for €499 from EWT. They're going to send me out a water tester kit and a bit more info on the system. Has anyone had their Gold Series 606 or 500 models installed that could give me the heads up on them? Dont want to buy a pig in the bag but in fairness it does come with a 15 year gaurantee and the reviews seem quite good.

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