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    Studying Part-time for a degree

    I was wondering if anybody has had any experience with studying part-time for a degree or knows somebody who has done it?

    When I was in school I was stupid enough to not study for the leaving cert. and although I still got a respectable score for someone who didn't do a tap of work, I didn't get my college course back then and I went off and farted my way through another college while again, avoiding any work. I got my(pretty worthless to be frank) diploma and now work in a field that is completely unrelated to what I studied.

    Am 24 now(so qualify as a mature student as far as I'm aware) so the leaving cert doesn't play such a big part in getting a college course as far as I know.

    I'm not in a position to stop working or only work part-time so it appears that part time study is my only choice. My main question really is... is it worth it? Are the degrees worth anything?

    I'm looking to go for a degree in computer science and CIT seems to have some options for me in that route but really I'm wondering, are part-time degrees even recognised anywhere?

    I know someone who just completed his part time degree and immediately got a years work in Brussels so can't be totally worthless but I'm still trying to determine if it's going to be worth the time and effort

    #2
    Kevy it really depends on what the course is. I've two done different part-time degrees in last 12 years or so, and they've helped me progress at work. I already have a full time degree from way back when too.

    When we've hired people at work we look at their relevant qualifications and experience, whether the degree was part- or full-time isn't really a factor in my experience.
    "There are a lot of points that we’ve left behind and this is with a young group. That probably tells you what they’re capable of and that they’re a very good side.

    Probably next year or the year after next they will take some stopping"

    Anthony Foley, May 2016. Axel RIP

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      #3
      Thanks Waterfordlad, and was it time consuming for you to get those degrees? Not my main concern as it's important enough to make time for it, just idle curiosity really? Would my whole life go on hold for it?

      Comment


        #4
        Like WL says it will depend on what you intend to do. You do qualify as a mature student as mature student is 23+ and LC doesnt matter as much for mature student and your life experience, work experience etc will play a role as to getting on course.
        Ive done a part time course in recent months and will be back full time in september after dropping out of course i had been on

        There was a few on my course who were studying part time while working. They did less subjects every year as they were working and worked around their classes
        The degree is worth it, just getting experience is the issue and if you are studying and working and getting experience it will be worth it

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          #5
          I completed the diploma part of a part time degree last year in Trinity.

          It's a big commitment time wise, bigger then you think. If you have a significant other then they'll need to be on board as well.

          I left it at the diploma stage as we had a baby and managing her plus college wasn't a runner for myself and the missus.

          It was expensive, circa €3k a year I think but it was worth it.
          "If we hit that bullseye, the rest of the dominoes will fall like a house of cards - checkmate!" Zapp Brannigan

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            #6
            Kevy my buddy (a former lorry driver in his 40's) is doing that course in CIT, he did a computer science course with FAS and then the credits got him onto the degree course proper, if you want his number I can let him know and am sure he will give you any info you want
            My computer thinks I'm gay
            What's the difference anyway
            When all the people do all day
            Is stare into a phone

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              #7
              Just to further what Sewa said, in my case the degree is identical to the degree done full time during the day. Same course, same exams, same bit of paper for the wall. You just do it at night.
              "If we hit that bullseye, the rest of the dominoes will fall like a house of cards - checkmate!" Zapp Brannigan

              Comment


                #8
                Originally posted by masterchief View Post
                I completed the diploma part of a part time degree last year in Trinity.

                It's a big commitment time wise, bigger then you think. If you have a significant other then they'll need to be on board as well.

                I left it at the diploma stage as we had a baby and managing her plus college wasn't a runner for myself and the missus.

                It was expensive, circa €3k a year I think but it was worth it.
                Very similar story to myself. Did diploma part of IT and Business management degree at night while working. Got too hard with the young kids to finish it out but will go back when they are a bit older.

                Its very doable though especially if you have no young kids
                The only difference between me and a madman is that I'm not mad.
                - Salvador Dali (1904-1989)

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                  #9
                  As said above the only difference between a full-time degree and a part time degree is that the latter takes longer than the former. You'll still have to complete the same number of Modules, although you may be able to get some exemptions if you can make a case that some modules that you have already completed are the same as those in the course you are planning to study.
                  The college will have an RPL (Recognition of Prior Learning) procedure that facilitates this.

                  There's also a concept called Experiential Learning which allows a prospective student to make a case that the work they have done in a particular area means that they have met the "Learning Outcomes" of a particular module, even though they may not have a formal Academic "piece of paper" to show for it. You would have to write a report showing how these "learning outcomes" have been met.

                  Most courses will have a work placement where the students are thrown out into industry for three or four months usually at the end of third year. This counts for credits worth two or three Modules and is "examined" by submitting a report. If you are working in the area in which you area studying, you would obviously get an exemption.

                  Remember, too that once you have passed a Module, you will hold that qualification for ever. There's no time limit any more, so if things get too pressurised, at home or at work, you can park it for a while and come back to it later.

                  There's no doubt that the time commitment will be big. A rough estimate is seven hours per week, per Module between class and Study. ( Three hours of classes per week would mean four hours study as well) It will also be tiring, coming in for classes after a day's work.

                  It may not be necessary to do all of the classes at night. Some part-time students attend for a day or two half days and make up the work hours at the weekend.

                  Have a chat with Sewa's pal and with the College staff also. The colleges are crying out for students, these days, particularly Mature Students who can be charged full price. They tend to be very flexible.

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Go for it. Yes, it is time consuming, but I actually think employers are more impressed with someone who has done something off their own bat and sacrificed their own free time.

                    Especially as you are young and probably don't have many commitments.

                    I'd love to do another course, but sadly the UK uni's now charge 9k per annum (thanks, Dave) and I'm not saddling myself with debt. Be aware that the Irish govt are likely to do the same at some stage ie let colleges set their own fees.
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                      #11
                      Originally posted by Upfront_1979 View Post
                      Very similar story to myself. Did diploma part of IT and Business management degree at night while working. Got too hard with the young kids to finish it out but will go back when they are a bit older.

                      Its very doable though especially if you have no young kids
                      Dang kids, ruining stuff!

                      I do plan on going back though.
                      Last edited by masterchief; 5th-June-2013, 20:27.
                      "If we hit that bullseye, the rest of the dominoes will fall like a house of cards - checkmate!" Zapp Brannigan

                      Comment


                        #12
                        Originally posted by Waterfordlad View Post
                        Kevy it really depends on what the course is. I've two done different part-time degrees in last 12 years or so, and they've helped me progress at work. I already have a full time degree from way back when too.

                        When we've hired people at work we look at their relevant qualifications and experience, whether the degree was part- or full-time isn't really a factor in my experience.
                        I totally agree with this. Ive done a few in my time, starting with an MSc relating to my work (engineering & software) on day release (very generous employer). More recently I did an evening law degree. Started it because I wanted to know a bit about intellectual property, but ended up doing the full thing - 2 nights a week over 4 years. It used to be really cheap - around £400 a year, but soared over the last few years. I really enjoyed dong it - class full of people doing other jobs like firemen, nurses, etc. One girl was a secretary and eventually ended up being a solicitor. I absolutely loved my main work, but these evenings were a breath of fresh air - I remember often starting them tired and finishing them invigorated! Exams were the same as the full time students - and while I was sad to use some of my precious holidays sitting exams, altogether it was a cost worth paying. Despite doing it at the time mostly for fun, its an essential part of what I do now. As Waterfordlad said, employers are unlikely to view a part-time degree negatively, and my experience is that they may be even impressed by it.
                        Provided the course is on something you find interesting - Id definitely recommend it.

                        Comment


                          #13
                          Originally posted by Kevy-Wevz View Post
                          Thanks Waterfordlad, and was it time consuming for you to get those degrees? Not my main concern as it's important enough to make time for it, just idle curiosity really? Would my whole life go on hold for it?
                          it depends on the specific course Kevin, and on how fast you want to finish it. I took time out from the one I did with the Open University as we had a child and moved house during that time, so you can often balance it a bit to suit you.

                          Great sense of achievement when you're finished, and treat yourself to a good night out after exams etc. I'm a real night owl so I often studied late at night when the rest were asleep. That worked for me but others prefer to get up early and study before work. Whatever works for you really.
                          "There are a lot of points that we’ve left behind and this is with a young group. That probably tells you what they’re capable of and that they’re a very good side.

                          Probably next year or the year after next they will take some stopping"

                          Anthony Foley, May 2016. Axel RIP

                          Comment


                            #14
                            I'd love to go back to college. I realised I did the wrong course. I was good at it, but I just don't enjoy the world around the career. The problem for me is getting the money to go back. I'd need serious bank to be able to survive and pay fees.
                            I know something that will blow your minds. I can't tell you and I can't tell you why I can't tell you. You'll know soon and then I'll be confirmed right.

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                              #15
                              Done too many exams in my time to go back for more.

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