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Ben Tune on his depression and suicide attempt

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  • SecondRowGal
    replied
    Originally posted by ormond lad View Post
    If they are currently unsure of what kind of support they are in need of IMHO(and from my own experience) they would be best suited to talking to their GP and having their GP, who should know the particulars and be able to give the best advice in who to go to for more specialised help, contact the relevant organisation/support agency etc.
    Thanks ol, will pass that on.

    Nevertheless, they have asked for help in the form of recommendations so if anyone has been particularly impressed with someone that they have been to see, these details are also welcome.

    Leave a comment:


  • ormond lad
    replied
    Originally posted by SecondRowGal View Post
    Hello all

    I have been asked to get some recommendations for mental health support professionals in the south Munster area (I suppose Cork, South Tipp, East Limerick area would be best). The person requesting isn't currently in a position to be more definitive about what kind of support they need, so if you could post or PM me with details of someone that you would recommend in general and contact details, that would be great.

    (I'm also going to post this in the other threads that we've had about mental health issues.)

    Thanks
    SRG
    If they are currently unsure of what kind of support they are in need of IMHO(and from my own experience) they would be best suited to talking to their GP and having their GP, who should know the particulars and be able to give the best advice in who to go to for more specialised help, contact the relevant organisation/support agency etc.

    Leave a comment:


  • SecondRowGal
    replied
    Hello all

    I have been asked to get some recommendations for mental health support professionals in the south Munster area (I suppose Cork, South Tipp, East Limerick area would be best). The person requesting isn't currently in a position to be more definitive about what kind of support they need, so if you could post or PM me with details of someone that you would recommend in general and contact details, that would be great.

    (I'm also going to post this in the other threads that we've had about mental health issues.)

    Thanks
    SRG

    Leave a comment:


  • LuckyDucker
    replied
    http://www.limerickleader.ie/sport/l...sion-1-5660255
    Former Limerick football goalkeeper Seamus O’Donnell speaks to Jerome O’Connell about his battle with depression and his wish to break any taboo surrounding the topic.

    Leave a comment:


  • Piquet
    replied
    John Murray back on the air just now. He was suffering from depression.

    Leave a comment:


  • McCloud
    replied
    Conor was interviewed on Prime Time last night. Worth watching.

    Leave a comment:


  • Grandpasimpson
    replied
    Fantastic blog by Conor Cusack, brother of Donal Og, currently being spreasd on Twitter:

    I still remember the moment well. It was a wet, cold, grey Friday morning. I rose out of bed having had no sleep the night before. Panic attacks are horrific experiences by day, by night they are even worse. As I drove to work on my trusted Honda 50, a group of my friends passed in their car heading to college. They all smiled and waved and looked so happy. I smiled and waved and acted happy. I had loved and excelled in school but it was the same with my hurling, it was the same with my friends, it was the same with my family, it was the same with the people of Cloyne, it was the same with life, I had lost interest in all of them. Losing interest in people was the worst. Where once I would have felt sadness at seeing my friends heading to where I had always wanted to go, I now didn’t. Something much larger, deeper, darker had taken hold of my mind and sadness, despair, hopelessness were not strong enough to survive alongside what I was feeling.

    The rest of the blog is at
    http://ccusack111.blogspot.ie/2013/1...-enemy_28.html

    Leave a comment:


  • etcpostmaster
    replied
    depression sucks. you can over come it to a certain extent but its always gonna be there. I have battled depression for number of years and i guess the defining hope is that there are bad days but there are also the good days too. Its important to remember that there will always be the good days and through hard work, things can get better

    Leave a comment:


  • Balla Boy
    replied
    Originally posted by Grandpasimpson View Post
    I've just heard that the father of one of my daughter's friends took his life this morning, this is something no 15 year old should have to go through.
    A friend of mine had a similar experience at a similar age. It marked her deeply. No one around that 15 year old should underestimate the amount of support they'll need.

    Those of us from so called "broken homes" can only begin to imagine a shadow of the abandonment and guilt felt by those whose parents commit suicide.

    How tragic to reach a point when you imagine it would be better for your child to live in a world without you.

    Leave a comment:


  • fitzy73
    replied
    Originally posted by Grandpasimpson View Post
    I've just heard that the father of one of my daughter's friends took his life this morning, this is something no 15 year old should have to go through.
    That is horrendous.

    It is about this time two years ago that a friend's wife took his own life.

    No money issues, no history of depression, no known major trauma in his life.

    He did it two weeks after he gave her away on their wedding day.

    They are still picking up the pieces, and I suspect always will be.

    Leave a comment:


  • Grandpasimpson
    replied
    I've just heard that the father of one of my daughter's friends took his life this morning, this is something no 15 year old should have to go through.

    Leave a comment:


  • fitzy73
    replied
    Might be of interest.

    A NEW IPHONE app which provides contact details and information on local mental health services has been launched by South Dublin County Council.
    MindMindR was developed in conjunction with the HSE and youth group Comhairle na nÓg and gives details of support services across a wide range of areas including depression, addiction, crisis pregnancy and suicide prevention.
    Emergency contact details for national services are also listed and services are mapped to enable the user to find the services themselves.
    More

    http://www.thejournal.ie/mental-heal...78767-Jul2013/

    Leave a comment:


  • Waterfordlad
    replied
    I have a person on my team at work suffering with depression. He has been open with the others, telling them in detail what is going on etc. Personally I wouldn't have told everyone but it was his choice and I respect that.
    I'm trying to help him in any way I can, mostly that is just listening. (I also try to take certain known stressors away where possible - e.g I'll do the monthly report to corporate rather than him having to do it). He's doing well thankfully, and seems to be really responding to the tweaked meds now and says he is relieved he has spoken to people about it.

    We have an Employee Assistance Program at work - totally confidential advice and counselling service - which he says he finds very good. Our company pays for the service but isn't told who is availing of it, just the numbers of people etc. Others are using it for financial advice, marital advice, etc and it's open to all families of employees so spouses and children can call/meet them too. We are encouraged to tell our families about the service and leave contact details at home etc. It seems to work well
    Last edited by Waterfordlad; 30th-May-2013, 12:11. Reason: typos

    Leave a comment:


  • Red October
    replied
    One of my parents struggled for years with depression. Made it hard as kids to be around them - we all knew something was wrong before they themselves did; but nobody could or would put a name on it. Eventually, after about five rough years, the right balance of meds was struck and a relatively steady phase was entered into. Every now and again the meds would need tweaking, but for 20+ years now, life has been decent.

    Work stress was a major trigger for this parent. So much so that eventually the option of early retirement was suggested - by them - agreed to and availed of. They had been a high-performer & achiever in an industry sector which was going through major upheaval at the time and were hugely well thought of professionally and liked within the organisation also. Their employer was fantastic about doing what was necessary to retain a valued employee in a less demanding yet still challenging role; where they could continue to be a 'net contributor' to the enterprise; rather than callously discarding them. And contribute they did for a good ten years before opting for retirement.

    That support, of colleagues and or the organisation they worked for, was absolutely fundamental to them retaining their sense of self-worth and of value. Whether we like it or not, so much of our sense is tied up in what we do. It's something we need to move beyond, but it's not easy.

    I look around now, twenty years on and unfortunately I see few private sector employers who would be willing to go that extra mile for one of their own. It had become unusual enough back in those days, let alone the modern era. There is no more 'one of our own'.

    If any out there are in a position as employers of having a staff member who suffers from depression or mental illness, please if possible adapt and work around the issue. I am not saying make allowances; that's passive and helps neither side. Make changes which can still suit both parties. Tough ask in these tough times, but these are tougher times for some.

    I cannot stress (no pun intended) how valuable this patience, understanding and willingness to be flexible can be for the sufferer.

    And you know what? What goes round comes round, I've found.

    Leave a comment:


  • lahinch_lass
    replied
    Fair play to Buceph & the others for sharing their stories.
    I've seen some folks reactions to those who suffer from depression .. unfortunately within my extended family I've seen siblings be dismissive of another's battle with depression. the eldest in the family having all her younger siblings thinking she's putting it on to get attention, now her next younger sibling has just had a battle with post-natal depression & you'd think that might wake the rest of them up but no, they still have the same attitude about their eldest sibling because she made the mistake of having her baby back in the mid-90's & having her first battles with depression back then too.
    I'm relieved she had my parents to support her emotionally as her own immediate family certainly didn't, it eventually took a move to the other side of the world & a diagnosis of being coeliac to finally get her to a point where her depression is now properly managed with both medication & diet being involved.

    I would sincerely hope the general attitude toward mental health is improving in this country & fewer people have to deal with dismissive & distainful families in addition to their illness.

    Leave a comment:

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