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    #16
    Originally posted by i_like_cake
    In slightly related news, the star walk app for
    iphone/ipad (and maybe other phones) is brilliant... I mean really
    really brilliant...I would recommend it .... big time....
    Sam, that was 79c on Friday (black Friday sale) but 2.39 again now.
    Forgot to get it
    "Some people don't know their easy lives... I wouldn't be so ungrateful" - Fiacre Ryan - #AutismAndMe

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      #17
      (meant dam not Sam, anyway) Another sale today so bought for 79c.
      Nice app. Look forwardto getting out of city with it
      "Some people don't know their easy lives... I wouldn't be so ungrateful" - Fiacre Ryan - #AutismAndMe

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        #18

        Originally posted by Mr T
        The Known Universe. American Museum of Natural History. You can spot the Tannhauser Gate if you look carefully. Strapped in? Lets go.


        http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=17jym...;feature=playe r_embedded
        Was intrigued by this, that (Tannhauser gate) was actually was mentioned in Blade Runner, and a useless piece of info, for a period the Leviathan was the largest telescope in the world. The mirror is made of a material called speculum and it took the good earl 3 goes before he had a workable one. two earlier ones he was constructing broke. It seems his wife was a good black smith and made the gates for the Demense. Worth taking you kid to see this place.
        Argos used to have telescopes in their catalogue.

        psychoanalysis is wasted on the Irish; Sigmund Freud

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          #19

          Originally posted by Mr T
          The Known Universe. American Museum of Natural History. You can spot the Tannhauser Gate if you look carefully. Strapped in? Lets go.


          http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=17jym...;feature=playe r_embedded
          This is a little entertaining also....


          He was as lame as a duck. Not the metaphorical lame duck either, but a real duck that was actually lame. Maybe from stepping on a land mine or something.

          Comment


            #20
            Dipstick, I'd seriously recommend binoculars and a star
            chart for a beginner.
            I use mine every clear night ... 10x50s from Lidl, cost 20
            quid. Scopes can take up to 30 mins to set up and align, it
            takes 10 secs to head out the back with binoculars.
            Don't buy a scope from a toy shop, they're as good as a
            rolled up newspaper.
            Proper entry level scopes start at about 130 euro ...
            Look on adverts.ie too ... there's always loads of people
            selling unused ones :-S
            The most popular brands are Celestron and Meade.

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              #21
              out of curiousity, are telescopes much good in suburbs/cities?
              "Some people don't know their easy lives... I wouldn't be so ungrateful" - Fiacre Ryan - #AutismAndMe

              Comment


                #22

                Originally posted by Hugged Rugger
                out of curiousity, are telescopes much good in suburbs/cities?
                Depends what you're peeping at...[img]smileys/biggrin.gif[/img]
                On the internet, you can be anything you want. It always amazes me why so many people choose to be stupid.

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                  #23
                  [img]smileys/lol.gif[/img][img]smileys/lol.gif[/img][img]smileys/lol.gif[/img]
                  He was as lame as a duck. Not the metaphorical lame duck either, but a real duck that was actually lame. Maybe from stepping on a land mine or something.

                  Comment


                    #24


                    Originally posted by ozoyo
                    Meade is THE brand.

                    I have been dreaming of buying myself one for years:
                    <A href="http://www.meade.com/etx_premier/index.html" target="_blank">
                    http://www.meade.com/etx_premier/index.html</A>





                    Oh yeah!!! me want one too
                    Con Artist

                    Comment


                      #25
                      Incredibly clear sky tonight even in the suburbs. Most stars I've seen
                      in a long while near the city
                      "Some people don't know their easy lives... I wouldn't be so ungrateful" - Fiacre Ryan - #AutismAndMe

                      Comment


                        #26
                        The 2010 Hubble Space Telescope Advent Calendar from boston.com

                        Comment


                          #27
                          very cool....
                          He was as lame as a duck. Not the metaphorical lame duck either, but a real duck that was actually lame. Maybe from stepping on a land mine or something.

                          Comment


                            #28




                            People throughout history have looked to the skies for portents
                            during troubled times, and those looking from the gutter to the stars
                            later tonight are in for a treat as a meteor phenomenon reaches its peak
                            while Jupiter and the Moon appear near each other in the sky.

                            The
                            Geminid meteor shower, which peaks tonight, is the best shooting star
                            display of the year, according to David Moore, chairman of Astronomy
                            Ireland. The meteor shower will go on all night, with spotters able to
                            avail of the long period of darkness at this time of year, although Mr
                            Moore said more shooting stars would be seen toward dawn or by those
                            getting up early in the morning.


                            The peak in meteor activity tonight will see some 20 times more than
                            average, or up to 100 an hour from the normal five- to six-an-hour rate.
                            Astronomy Ireland is asking people across the country to watch out for
                            the shooting stars, record how many they see every 15 minutes and notify
                            the organisation of their findings.</span>

                            "Even if there are only
                            breaks in the clouds, people can see the meteors all over the sky," Mr
                            Moore said, adding a telescope was not required.


                            Geminids are unusual because the tiny grain-sized fragments in the show
                            come from an object thought to be an asteroid, a rocky body formed from
                            the dead nucleus of a comet, rather than from a passing “dirty snowball”
                            comet. Earth runs into a stream of debris from the object, named
                            Phaethon, around this time every year, with the tracks of the meteors
                            pointing back to the Gemini constellation.


                            Jupiter, one of brightest objects in the sky, and the Moon will also be
                            in conjunction - appearing to be near each other - although the planet
                            is some half a billion miles away from the Earth, compared to some
                            quarter of a million miles in the Moon's case. "This is a fantastic
                            sight with the naked eye, but people should get their telescopes out, as
                            the Moon and Jupiter are the two best objects to view in a telescope at
                            night," Mr Moore said. "Anyone who doesn't know the sky well, they'll
                            know on Monday night where the planet Jupiter is, a brilliant star just
                            below the Moon."


                            Later this month, there will be further celestial pageantry in the form
                            of a lunar eclipse on the winter solstice, December 21st, when the
                            northern hemisphere has its least number of daylight hours. A lunar
                            eclipse happens when the moon's orbit takes it through the shadow of the
                            Earth, which is then between it and the Sun.</span>

                            The eclipse will
                            start from 6.30am, when a "bite" is taken out of the left side of the
                            Moon, and the Earth's satellite will be totally inside the Earth's
                            shadow at about 7.40am, with the middle of the eclipse coming at about
                            8.18am. The Sun will rise from about 8.50am on the east coast, with
                            those on the west coast able to obtain a lingering view of the lunar
                            eclipse.</span>


                            Tonight will also see Astronomy Ireland holding its Christmas lecture in
                            Trinity College, Dublin, at 8pm. The speaker on the role of Astronomy,
                            is Dr Ian Corbett, general secretary of the International Astronomical
                            Union, or, in the words of Mr Moore: "astronomy's answer to the pope".

                            Comment


                              #29

                              <h1 style="text-align: center; font-size: xx-large;">Lunar Eclipse &amp; Solstice Watch

                              21 December 2010</font></h1>Just before sunrise on the Winter Solstice 2010, a Full Moon will turn
                              red as it rests just above the western horizon. This event is known as a
                              total lunar eclipse, as the Moon will move into Earth's shadow. From
                              6:32am, you will be able to see the Moon gradually get darker as Earth's
                              shadow is cast upon it, and at 7:40am the Moon will have entered
                              totality.

                              Comment


                                #30
                                I was out with the dog this morning, and walking down the
                                road I saw the moon low over Mayfield and it was a fantastic
                                light red/yellow colour. Beautiful sight.
                                If a man tried to take his time on earth and prove before he died what one man's life could be worth, I wonder what would happen to this world

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