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    Astronomy

    A son of mine who spends most of his time in the clouds anywayhas expressed an interest in astronomy. Anyone out there know anything about telescopes for beginners? No, the Hubble is out and Patrick Moore is uncontactable so if any of you budding or experienced stargazers can help, I'd appreciate same.

    #2
    A good place to start would be here http://www.astronomy.ie/even has a junior section.
    Excellence is hard to keep quite - Sherrie Coale

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      #3


      This is of no help to you whatsoever but one does wonder what type of enraptured conversation these two liginds were having as they brought together their formidable intellects and experience to jointly explore the mysteries of the universe and of the rules regarding front row engagement in the scrum.


      Sir Patrick:The shape of your right ear reminds me the constellation ofPisces Austrinus.


      Dr Mick: Yeah well if you spent your working life rubbing your ears against John Hayes's arse you'd be happy to have any ears at all.


      edited by ruck. picture WAYYYYY too big.


      The picture which Herr Ruck edited was from here (where it looks so small and unassuming)


      http://www.tcd.ie/Secretary/Communic...ss_Releases/PR 0203/PRhddec.htm


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        #4
        Mr Cat has been a boy astonomer since ... well, boyhood, in fact, absolutely loves it. He'd be happy to give your lad any advice and encouragement, if you PM me I'll give you his email.

        I know for a fact that although he's always had fairly inexpensive telescopes, he found life a lot easier once he had a motor drive on it, the one he had before was awful wobbly to look through [/end of Cat's knowledge of telescopes].
        Hope Not Hate

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          #5
          Only thing I'd say is avoid any telescopes you see in toy shops. They generally don't collect enough light to see anything at all at night.

          Comment


            #6
            Meade is THE brand.

            I have been dreaming of buying myself one for years:
            <a href="http://www.meade.com/etx_premier/index.html" target="_blank">
            http://www.meade.com/etx_premier/index.html</a>



            Comment


              #7
              Originally posted by Snamh


              This is of no help to you whatsoever but one does wonder what type of enraptured conversation these two liginds were having as they brought together their formidable intellects and experience to jointly explore the mysteries of the universe and of the rules regarding front row engagement in the scrum.


              Sir Patrick:The shape of your right ear reminds me the constellation ofPisces Austrinus.


              Dr Mick: Yeah well if you spent your working life rubbing your ears against John Hayes's arse you'd be happy to have any ears at all.


              edited by ruck. picture WAYYYYY too big.


              The picture which Herr Ruck edited was from here (where it looks so small and unassuming)


              http://www.tcd.ie/Secretary/Communications/Press_Releases/PR 0203/PRhddec.htm





              I think what was said by Dr Moore was " Dr Mick, The Sea of Tranquility is absolutely magnificent these nights."


              Dr Mick: " Jaysus, Dr Moore., I'd never go for a swim in the dark"


              Now as God is my witness, that was what was said. Richard Dawkinswas also present at this time and canconfirm that God is indeed my witness.

              Comment


                #8


                Dipstick, I read this rather good book over Easter, which is a nice introduction to cosmology. Its discussion of the increasing sophistication of telescopes, andthe types of observation possible at different levels of magnification,would be a good way into the subject and could perhaps allow for some of the famous observations to be replicated.It even features the Leviathan of Parsonstown.


                It mightbe a heavy read if your son is young, but if so it may serve the useful purpose of putting him off the subject for good and saving you the cost of a telescope, funds which can instead be put towards new golf clubs, big feed of pints, and so forth.

                Comment


                  #9


                  on another scientific note, they are/have been trying to make mini big bangs in switzerland in the CERN plant (Angels and Deamons readers might find the name familiar).


                  why does that make me nervous





                  "We are going to make mini Big Bangs. There has never been such a jump in particle physics. It will go into an area that we don't really understand," said Brian Cox of Manchester University at the annual meeting of the British Association for the Advancement of Science.

                  He is referring to a new experiment that will be conducted at the Large Hadron Collider, the 27km-long underground circular particle accelerator at the CERN experimental facility near Geneva on the Franco-Swiss border. Scientists will smash protons (hydrogen nuclei) into each


                  other at such tremendous speeds that they expect to replicate the conditions during the Big Bang.

                  "It is an incredibly exciting machine. It will be turned on next year and run for at least a decade and probably 20 years and the first results - if the machine behaves itself - should start coming out within a year," Dr Cox said.

                  The experiment might also reveal the existence of other spatial dimensions which are postulated by various candidate theories to the "theory of everything". But the most important question is how matter appeared in the beginning of the universe.

                  "We don't know what 95 per cent of the universe is made of - which is a bit embarrassing for a subject that claims to be fundamental," Dr Cox said. "There is dark matter. It is all over the place but we have no idea what it is. There is also something called dark energy, and that is an even bigger question. It makes up about 70 per cent of the energy in the universe, but again we have absolutely no idea what it is."

                  Some physicists think that at first, there was nothing but, due to the uncertainty principle, the nothing "fluctuated" and as a consequence, the Big Bang happened. According to such views, there might be many universes.

                  If the theories are correct, the collider should create tiny black holes that evaporate and leave behind other particles. These particles might offer evidences about additional spatial dimensions above the familiar three ones we know.

                  "That would be an even bigger headline than the black holes. It could be that there is a whole new universe a millimeter away from our heads but at right-angles to the three dimensions that are here," Dr Cox said. "That would be a real paradigm shift - our relegation to a little sheet in a multi-dimensional universe. That kind of thing is really profound and will capture the imagination that perhaps the origin of mass won't, although it should. For the first time in many decades we have built a machine that exceeds our powers of prediction. New processes are bound to be discovered. We are truly journeying into unknown territory."

                  Some have worried that such an experiment that would create black holes could destroy the entire planet, but Dr Cox dismissed the worries. "The probability is at the level of 10 to the minus 40," he said. That is a 1 in 10,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000 ,000 chance.



                  dont forget to carry the 1
                  "Some people don't know their easy lives... I wouldn't be so ungrateful" - Fiacre Ryan - #AutismAndMe

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Dipstick, my own young fellow has a similar interest (he's 13). I
                    initally bought him one from a toy shop - forget them they are crap.

                    The best type of scope at a moderate price is a refractor telescope
                    (one that uses a mirror). If your young man wants to be able to see
                    say, the moons of Jupiter or the Crab Nebula then I'd recommend the
                    Seben Big Boss 1400mm-150 reflector mirror telescope.

                    You can see this and buy it at:

                    http://www.astroshop.de/en/telescope...e-packages/big -
                    boss-150-1400-package-en

                    Don't forget to get him some charts of the cosmos to help him
                    navigate the sky.
                    If your religion is worth killing for, please start with yourself.

                    Comment


                      #11
                      was looking for a kind of galactic atlas and came across this image which i thought was pretty cool:

                      was also reading some other stuff about the path the solar system takes through the galaxy and though this was funny:

                      Professors Medvedev and Melott of the University of Kansas have a
                      different theory based on the same regular motion. As the Sun ventures
                      out "above" the galactic plane, it becomes increasingly exposed to the
                      cosmic ray generating shock front that the Milky Way creates as it
                      ploughs through space. As we get closer to this point of maximum
                      exposure, leaving the shielding of the thick galactic disk behind, the
                      Kansas researchers hold that the increasing radiation destroys many
                      higher species, forcing another evolutionary epoch. This theory also
                      matches in time with the dinosaur extinction - and it's nice to see
                      theories for that from Kansas not based on "an angry bearded man in the
                      sky did it"</span>.

                      "Some people don't know their easy lives... I wouldn't be so ungrateful" - Fiacre Ryan - #AutismAndMe

                      Comment


                        #12
                        In slightly related news, the star walk app for iphone/ipad (and maybe other phones) is brilliant... I mean really really brilliant...

                        I would recommend it .... big time....

                        He was as lame as a duck. Not the metaphorical lame duck either, but a real duck that was actually lame. Maybe from stepping on a land mine or something.

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                          #13
                          Been watching this recently on BBCHD decent programme

                          Comment


                            #14
                            yeah i watched some of that. very good
                            "Some people don't know their easy lives... I wouldn't be so ungrateful" - Fiacre Ryan - #AutismAndMe

                            Comment


                              #15

                              The Known Universe. American Museum of Natural History. You can spot the Tannhauser Gate if you look carefully. Strapped in? Lets go.


                              http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=17jym...;feature=playe r_embedded

                              Life just kind of empties out, less a deluge than a drought...

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