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    Iraq 4 years on



    Well done George. The people who have died for oil thank you.


    Violence marks anniversary of Iraq war


    Tuesday, 20 March 2007 23:21


    Violence has marked the fourth anniversary of the US-led war on Iraq which has claimed tens of thousands of lives.


    Today, 16 people, including two US soldiers were among those killed in car bomb and mortar attacks, across Baghdad.


    In the country's western Anbar province, tribal fighters and police clashed with al-Qaeda linked militants near Fallujah.


    AdvertisementA provincial official in Ramadi said 39 militants were killed, along with nine tribal fighters and eight policemen.


    The latest violence comes as a US general said Iraqi insurgents used children in a suicide attack at the weekend, raising worries that the insurgency has adopted a new tactic to get through security checkpoints with bombs.


    An average of 100 people a day have been killed in Iraq since Saddam Hussein was ousted from power in March 2003.


    Humanitarian impact of war highlighted


    The UN Refugee Agency has said there has been an abject denial around the world of the humanitarian impact of invading Iraq.


    The UNHCR said the UN faced an enormous task in helping Jordan and Syria cope with a huge influx of Iraqi refugees.


    Some two million Iraqis are now in neighbouring countries - many of them since before Saddam Hussein was toppled, according to the UNHCR. Another 1.9 million are estimated to be displaced within the country.


    About 730,000 Iraqis have fled their homes since the beginning of 2006 and are facing increasing hardship inside Iraq.


    The UNHCR estimates that up to 50,000 people are fleeing their homes every month.


    An estimated four million people in Iraq are dependent on food assistance, while the rate of chronic malnutrition among children is 23%.


    Former Iraqi vice president executed


    Saddam Hussein's former vice president, Taha Yassin Ramadan, was executed early today.


    He is the fourth person to be hanged for the killing of 148 Shias from the town of Dujail.


    Ramadan was given a life sentence in November but an appeal court ruled that he be executed.


    The trial court found Ramadan guilty of issuing orders for the systematic detention, torture and killing of men, women and children from Dujail after an attempt on Saddam Hussein's life in the town in 1982.


    Excellence is hard to keep quite - Sherrie Coale

    #2
    Originally posted by McCloud


    Well done George. The people who have died for oil thank you.





    Saddam Hussein's former vice president, Taha Yassin Ramadan, was executed early today.


    He is the fourth person to be hanged for the killing of 148 Shias from the town of Dujail.


    Ramadan was given a life sentence in November but an appeal court ruled that he be executed.


    The trial court found Ramadan guilty of issuing orders for the systematic detention, torture and killing of men, women and children from Dujail after an attempt on Saddam Hussein's life in the town in 1982.








    Imagine if an outbreak of justice occured? Oliver North would be crapping himself. Thatcher would be a very worried woman since she, along with Regan armed Saddam so as he could continue the war with Iran and the oppression of the Kurds. Going further back, there must be some surviving members of the Heath and Wilson Governments who also armed Iraq so as they could attack Kurish villages in the 60s and 70s. There are probably very few left living from the Trueman, Atlee and Churchill post-war Governments who helped create the war like climate in the Iran/Iraq area by overthrowing their president in 1951 and replacing him with the Shah who was such a tyrant that the Ayatollah was seen as a welcome change in 1979.
    There are only two roads, victory for the working class, freedom, or victory for the fascists which means tyranny. Both combatants know what\'s in store for the loser.

    Buenaventura Durruti

    Comment


      #3



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      <TD vAlign=top>Crushing fear that stalks America </TD></TR></T></TABLE><!-FR::End no photo-text line table-><!-FR::Start no photo-text line table->
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      <TD vAlign=top>Robert Fisk </TD></TR></T></TABLE>


      George Bush has done Osama binLaden's job for him . . . he has crushed the courage of his people and rules by threat, writes Robert Fisk





      THERE'S a helluva difference between Cairo University and the campus of Valdosta in the Deep South of the United States. I visited both last week and I feel like I've been travelling on a gloomy spaceship, or maybe a time machine, with just two distant constellations to guide my journey. One is clearly named Iraq; the other is fear. They have a lot in common.


      The politics department at Cairo's vast campus is run by Dr Mona elBaradei . . . yes, she is the sister of the head of the International Atomic Energy Agency . . . and her students, most of them young women, almost all scarved, duly wrote out their questions at the end of the turgid Fisk lecture on the failings of journalism in the Middle East.


      "Why did you invade Iraq?" was one. I didn't like the "you" bit, but the answer was "oil".


      "What do you think of the Egyptian government?" At this, I looked at my watch. I reckon, I told the students, that I just had time to reach Cairo airport for my flight before Hosni Mubarak's intelligence lads heard of my reply.


      Much nervous laughter. Well, I said, new constitutional amendments to enshrine emergency legislation into common law and the arrest of Muslim Brotherhood supporters was not a path to democracy. And I ran through the US state department's list of Egyptian arbitrary detentions, routine torture and unfair trials.


      I didn't see how the local constabulary could do much about condemnation from Mubarak's American friends. But it was a symbolic moment. These cheerful, intelligent students wanted to see if they would hear the truth or get palmed off with another bromide about Egypt's march to democracy, its stability . . .


      versus the disaster of Iraq . . . and its supposedly roaring success. No one doubts that Mubarak's boys keep a close eye on his country's students.


      But the questions I was asked after class told it all. Why didn't "we" leave Iraq? Are "we" going to attack Iran?


      Did "we" really believe in democracy in the Middle East? In fact "our" shadow clearly hung over these young people.


      Thirty hours later, I flicked on the television in my Valdosta, Georgia, hotel room and there was a bejewelled lady on Fox TV telling American viewers that if "we" left Iraq, the "jihadists" would come after us.


      "They want a Caliphate that will take over the world, " she shrieked about a report that two children had deliberately been placed in an Iraqi car bomb which then exploded. She ranted on about how Muslim "jihadists" had been doing this "since the 1970s in Lebanon".


      It was tosh, of course. Children were never locked into car bombs in Beirut, and there weren't any "jihadists" around in the Lebanese civil war of the 1970s. But fear had been sown. Now that the House of Representatives is talking about the US withdrawal by August 2008, fear seems to drip off the trees in America.


      Up in the town of Tiger, Georgia, Kathy Barnes is reported to be looking for omens as she fears for the life of her son, Captain Edward Berg of the 4th Brigade, US 3rd Infantry Division, off to Iraq for a second tour of duty, this time in George Bush's infamous "surge". Last time he was there, his mothe
      New infraction avoidance policy: a post may be described as imbecilic, but its author should never be described as an imbecile.

      Comment


        #4
        Its so obvious what the terrorists strategy is that the only answer for why Bush and co. perpetuate this fear on their own citizenryis because they like the control it gives them. I'm sure somebody somewhere finds the whole situation vastly amusing...[img]smileys/sad.gif[/img]
        The only difference between me and a madman is that I'm not mad.
        - Salvador Dali (1904-1989)

        Comment


          #5
          Originally posted by Ronnie
          Originally posted by McCloud


          Well done George. The people who have died for oil thank you.





          Saddam Hussein's former vice president, Taha Yassin Ramadan, was executed early today.


          He is the fourth person to be hanged for the killing of 148 Shias from the town of Dujail.


          Ramadan was given a life sentence in November but an appeal court ruled that he be executed.


          The trial court found Ramadan guilty of issuing orders for the systematic detention, torture and killing of men, women and children from Dujail after an attempt on Saddam Hussein's life in the town in 1982.








          Imagine if an outbreak of justice occured? Oliver North would be crapping himself. Thatcher would be a very worried woman since she, along with Regan armed Saddam so as he could continue the war with Iran and the oppression of the Kurds. Going further back, there must be some surviving members of the Heath and Wilson Governments who also armed Iraq so as they could attack Kurish villages in the 60s and 70s. There are probably very few left living from the Trueman, Atlee and Churchill post-war Governments who helped create the war like climate in the Iran/Iraq area by overthrowing their president in 1951 and replacing him with the Shah who was such a tyrant that the Ayatollah was seen as a welcome change in 1979.


          Really? So all those T-55's, T-72's, BMP's, BTR's, AK's, RPK's, DSHK's, MIG's, RPG's, 82mm mortars etc etc which were the weaponry of the Iraqi armed forces came from the US and the UK? I didn't realise the Warsaw Pact had actually embraced capitalism and set up franchisee operationsfor its armaments industry in the west.[img]smileys/rolleyes.gif[/img]
          \"This year is different because this year they won\'t beat snow off a rope. They\'ll revert back to type and get 6 shades of s**t bate out of them in the group stages of the HEC ...\" Tobyglen 21 Sept 2010

          Comment


            #6
            Originally posted by Combatlogo


            Really? So all those T-55's, T-72's, BMP's, BTR's, AK's, RPK's, DSHK's, MIG's, RPG's, 82mm mortars etc etc which were PART OF the weaponry of the Iraqi armed forces came from the US and the UK? I didn't realise the Warsaw Pact had actually embraced capitalism and set up franchisee operationsfor its armaments industry in the west.


            Fixed for you.
            New infraction avoidance policy: a post may be described as imbecilic, but its author should never be described as an imbecile.

            Comment


              #7
              So which weaponry did the west supply to Iraq OD?
              \"This year is different because this year they won\'t beat snow off a rope. They\'ll revert back to type and get 6 shades of s**t bate out of them in the group stages of the HEC ...\" Tobyglen 21 Sept 2010

              Comment


                #8


                Originally posted by Combatlogo
                So which weaponry did the west supply to Iraq OD?




                If you don'tknow the answer to your own question then you have no right to post on this thread. Read up on the subject and come back when you know something about it.
                New infraction avoidance policy: a post may be described as imbecilic, but its author should never be described as an imbecile.

                Comment


                  #9
                  Originally posted by Old Dog


                  Originally posted by Combatlogo
                  So which weaponry did the west supply to Iraq OD?




                  If you don'tknow the answer to your own question then you have no right to post on this thread. Read up on the subject and come back when you know something about it.


                  Bizarre logic - questions are only to be asked if the answer is known. I'd say I know more about the subject than an armchair pundit like you seeing as I was over there this time 4 years ago getting shot at with some of the weapons I mentioned above - funnily enough, western made weaponry didn't seem to be too popular among the locals.
                  \"This year is different because this year they won\'t beat snow off a rope. They\'ll revert back to type and get 6 shades of s**t bate out of them in the group stages of the HEC ...\" Tobyglen 21 Sept 2010

                  Comment


                    #10


                    http://topics.nytimes.com/top/refere...opics/subjects /a/arms_sales_abroad/index.html?query=MATRIX%20CHURCHILL%20C ORP&amp;field=org&amp;match=exact


                    have a read through that lot for starters, then try googling "arm sales Iraq UK" or "arm sales iraq thatcher", "arm sales Iraq western governments" etc


                    or you can continue to do this if you like





                    The only difference between me and a madman is that I'm not mad.
                    - Salvador Dali (1904-1989)

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Originally posted by Combatlogo


                      all those T-55's, T-72's, BMP's, BTR's, AK's, RPK's, DSHK's, MIG's, RPG's, 82mm mortars etc etc which were the weaponry of the Iraqi armed forces came from the US and the UK? I didn't realise the Warsaw Pact had actually embraced capitalism and set up franchisee operationsfor its armaments industry in the west.[img]smileys/rolleyes.gif[/img]


                      Funny you should mention that as what the US did was to sell replacement soviet parts to Iraq, see here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arms_sa...Iraq_1973-1990it was called the Bear Spares program. Also if you want it from the horse mouth try this http://www.webcom.com/~lpease/collections/hidden/teicher.htm


                      The only difference between me and a madman is that I'm not mad.
                      - Salvador Dali (1904-1989)

                      Comment


                        #12


                        Are you gone AWOL Combat? There was an interesting Panorama programme on it last night.


                        My computer thinks I'm gay
                        What's the difference anyway
                        When all the people do all day
                        Is stare into a phone

                        Comment


                          #13
                          perhaps he's actually reading some of those articles?[img]smileys/shock.gif[/img]
                          The only difference between me and a madman is that I'm not mad.
                          - Salvador Dali (1904-1989)

                          Comment


                            #14


                            The West supplied N.B.C suits without which the gassing of the Kurds could not have taken place. Via agents, the West (Britain in this case) supplied Rapier Anti-Aircraft missiles andChieftan tanks. Othermore secret supplies were purchased after theBritish Government allowed arms manufacturers to set of a stall at the Baghdad Arms Fair in April 1989.


                            This is not unusual. The West often supplies complete and utter b*****ds with all kinds of weaponry to suppress their own populations. Chile, Indonesia, Columbia, Iran, Iraq etc.


                            When you were being shot at by the locals for invading their country (history shows this type of behaviour from the indigenous populations of invaded countriesto be quite normal) did you ever wonder about the sanity or morality of the politicians who sent you there to fight for the interests of big business?
                            There are only two roads, victory for the working class, freedom, or victory for the fascists which means tyranny. Both combatants know what\'s in store for the loser.

                            Buenaventura Durruti

                            Comment


                              #15





                              Not forgetting the anthrax and other chemical/biological weaponry and research data provided by Ronnie Raygun and Bush Senior, among others.


                              New infraction avoidance policy: a post may be described as imbecilic, but its author should never be described as an imbecile.

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