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    Do the sick mand vulnerable matter in ire



    Don't know if any of you saw the PrimeTime special on our 2-tier health service on RTE1 last night (pretty scary if you don't have health insurance...), but it now looks like we are taking care of the sick to a new low. Looks like Mary is planning to give St. Luke's (our ONLY specialist cancer treatment centre) to her builder friends (see http://www.examiner.ie/irishexaminer...ry.aspx-qqqg=i reland-qqqm=ireland-qqqa=ireland-qqqid=27746-qqqx=1.asp &nbsp[img]smileys/wink.gif[/img]. BTW St. James's is already overcrowded - even with insurance you are not guaranteed a bed and/or treatment there.


    What has this country come to? Does anyonein government really care about treating our sick, old and infirm?


    Anyone can fall sick at any stage of your life. We'll all be old some day (of course if we don't drop off on the way there!). According to Bertie this country has never been as well off; so why can't we afford decent health-care facilities?


    A very sobering thought for all.

    #2
    In answer to the question one word NO.
    Excellence is hard to keep quite - Sherrie Coale

    Comment


      #3


      14 March 2007


      €1 million lifesaving scanner lies idle in hospital


      By Sean O’Riordan
      A LIFESAVING machine which cost €1 million has been lying idle in a Cork hospital for the last three months, because nobody has been appointed to operate it.


      It’s the second piece of high-tech medical equipment gathering dust because of a shortage of funding or staff. Another CT scanner has been sitting in storage in its original packaging for the past three months and is surrounded by hampers of hospital laundry and cleaning equipment at the Louth County Hospital in Dundalk.


      The Irish Examiner has learnt the CT scanner arrived at Mallow General Hospital just before Christmas, nearly three years after it was promised by then Minister for Health, Micheál Martin and it could take several weeks, if not months, before it becomes fully operational.


      Members of the support group, The Friends of Mallow Hospital, have criticised the delay and pointed out that for the foreseeable future patients will have to travel by ambulance to Cork University Hospital to avail of CT scans.


      Friends of Mallow Hospital spokesman, Noel O’Connor, claimed that consultants at the hospital and local GPs were “very frustrated” by the delay.


      Prior to Micheál Martin’s promise — which was made on Good Friday three years ago — Mr O’Connor’s organisation was preparing to start a fundraising campaign to purchase a CT (Computerised Tomography) scanner.


      “We were delighted when Micheál Martin said the Department of Health would fund it and then when it eventually arrived. It has been tested and it is working. But there is no radiographer attached to the hospital and of even more concern is that they [the HSE] haven’t even put an advert in the newspapers for the position,” Mr O’Connor said.


      The machine, sometimes called a CAT scan, uses special x-ray equipment to obtain image data from different angles around the body and then uses computer processing of the information to show a cross-section of body tissues and organs.


      A spokeswoman for the HSE (South Forum) said,


      “The go-ahead for recruitment is expected shortly. In fact, it’s imminent,” the HSE spokeswoman added.


      Nevertheless, other sources at the hospital have maintained it could take weeks, if not months, before the successful applicant is using the machine.


      Click here for irishexaminer.com stories before this date
      Excellence is hard to keep quite - Sherrie Coale

      Comment


        #4


        14 March 2007


        Father took baby from hospital in mercy dash to A&E


        By Caroline O’Doherty
        TWO hospitals have defended their treatment of a baby boy whose father discharged him and made a mercy dash to A&E in a frantic bid to get the child an operation.


        James Carroll ordered staff at Our Lady of Lourdes Hospital, Drogheda, to disconnect his seriously sick six-week-old son from a drip and monitoring equipment so that he could drive the baby to Crumlin Children’s Hospital in Dublin for emergency treatment.


        The anxious father took matters into his own hands after he and his partner, Jennifer, waited by their baby’s hospital cot in Drogheda for almost five days while doctors there tried in vain to secure the infant a surgical bed in Crumlin.


        Baby Bobby Carroll was attended to within minutes of his arrival at Crumlin, was operated on within hours and was recovering well at the hospital yesterday while doctors assessed him for further surgery.


        A relieved James Carroll thanked staff at Drogheda for their efforts to get his son a bed, and praised the medical skills of doctors in Crumlin, but said he could not accept a health system that left a baby waiting in distress for days for surgery that had been diagnosed as essential. “He was very sore, he couldn’t feed and he was crying solid for hours. I have absolutely nothing against the staff in Drogheda but I will never take Bobby there again.”


        Drogheda said it kept Crumlin abreast of Bobby’s condition throughout his wait for a surgical bed but the hospital stressed it had no control over bed availability at Crumlin.


        Dr David Vaughan, a consultant paediatrician at Drogheda, said Bobby was not in danger during his wait. Crumlin also said it had kept up to date with Bobby’s condition while waiting to allocate him a bed. A statement said: “Our Lady’s Children’s Hospital, Crumlin, prioritises all patient transfers based on clinical prioritisation. Children waiting for admission are prioritised at several times during the day according to their clinical need.”


        The charity Children in Hospital Ireland (CHI) said the case highlighted the need for improvements in services.


        “Parents should be able to access the services they need for their children when they need them,” said CHI chairwoman Mary O’Connor. “It is not acceptable that a parent should be put in a position where they have to take such a drastic step.”


        Ms O’Connor said CHI was interested in hearing from other parents who had been through similar difficulties so that their experiences could be recorded.


        Click here for irishexaminer.com stories before this date
        Excellence is hard to keep quite - Sherrie Coale

        Comment


          #5


          There is ANOTHER set of equipment lying idle in Cork University Hospital because there is no qualified neuro-interventional radiologist in the hospital yet, to set it up.


          They have actually hired a local boy who isn't experienced enough to come back to Ireland yet to set it all up, rather than the far more experienced candidates who were available to start more than a year ago.


          What's worse is that there are limits to how long you can keep a post open but these have been ignored.The friend of mine in the hospital who told me this, says it is a common occurrence to keep posts for the Cork candidate rather than the (perhaps) best candidate.


          How many lives have been lost in the 18 months before this guy takes up his post ?

          Comment


            #6
            Health service is a complete jokeshop.

            It provides poor levels of service in some important areas (others are fine).

            It costs a fortune to run, and is hopelessly inefficient.

            Comment


              #7


              McCloud, heard the father of that kid being interviewed on the radio while I was driving home last night. As I understod it the relieving operation was fairly minor, but the consequences could have been major had it not happened. As it was the baby suffered unecessarily for days. Not good publicity for the decision-makers.


              Point, I'm also aware of similar situations with unused kit. Plus of couse some hospitals are not even allowed treat certain cases because the bureacrats have decided otherwise. Try getting acute service if you live in W. Clare (just one e.g.), esp if the ambulance has to negotiate rush-hour through Limerick first.


              It seems a combination of bureacracy, flawed ideology and just plain incompetence is costing lives. Know a few docs/surgeons (including one attached to Monaghan hosp), and they find the system both frustrating and very inefficient. As you said how many have to die before something is done?

              Comment


                #8
                anyone in need of an operation should head off to India and have it done there. People in the uk have been doing it for a few years and have saved a fortune.
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                If you’re fat stay in the ruck - Liam Toland

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                  #9


                  Remember to ask the parisites about this when they come knocking on your door.[img]smileys/mad.gif[/img]


                  Doctors furious over plan for private A&amp;E beds

                  A&amp;E consultants have said they are "extremely disturbed" by proposals that would mean some of their patients would automatically get a bed because they are privately insured.


                  The consultants were commenting on plans to build private hospitals on the site of a number of public hospitals around the country.


                  Spokesman, Dr James Binchy, said it had emerged during discussions on new contract talks for consultants, that privately insured patients in a public hospital's A&amp;E would be transferred to the private facility if they needed a bed.


                  The move has again fuelled controversy over the planned co-located hospitals which Opposition parties have said they will scrap if returned to government.


                  Dr Binchy of the Irish Association of Emergency Medicine, the A&amp;E doctors' representative body, said the proposals, as tabled at the talks, state that the private facility would, on a 24/7 basis, "take accident and emergency patients from the public hospital's A&amp;E Department who opt for private treatment".


                  'Under the co-location model, beds for emergency admissions will now be allocated on the basis of the ability to pay'


                  He said: "Under such a system, patients who opt to be treated privately will be admitted directly to the co-located private facility, while those who cannot afford private medicine will continue to languish in the A&amp;E Department while awaiting a bed in the public system."


                  The decision as to which patients will get a hospital bed will now be made on the basis of the ability to pay rather than clinical need, he said.


                  He added that the A&amp;E doctors had repeatedly highlighted the failure of the current health service to provide appropriate in-patient beds on a timely basis for patients who require admission to hospital.


                  "However, notwithstanding the failings of the present system, at least the available hospitals beds are currently allocated on the basis of clinical need.


                  "In a seemingly new interpretation of the concept of 'equity of access' for all, the Department of Health and Health Service Executive proposes that, under the co-location model, beds for emergency admissions will now be allocated on the basis of the ability to pay." The Minister for Health, Mary Harney, said the private facilities were aimed at freeing up around 1,000 private beds in public hospitals for public patients.


                  She said these beds were currently being subsidised by the taxpayer and were creating an inequity.


                  The new private hospitals would absorb the private hospitals instead, creating more beds for public patients.


                  It remains unclear if contracts with developers will be signed before the general election. The Opposition has called for no deals to be done until the next government is in place.


                  Eilish O'Regan




                  Excellence is hard to keep quite - Sherrie Coale

                  Comment


                    #10





                    I know it has it's flaws (plenty of them) but every time I look at the Irish health system I'm grateful for the NHS.


                    GIven the amount the goverment here spends on the provision of universal healthcare, and the amount of the tax spend that it makes up, I'm amazed that the Irish govt can justify taxation levels without offering something comparable.
                    "We will not walk in fear, one of another. We will not be driven into an age of unreason if we dig deep into our history and remember we are not descended from fearful men" Edward R Murrow

                    "Little by little, we have been brought into the present condition in which we are able neither to tolerate the evils from which we suffer, nor the remedies we need to cure them." - Livy


                    "I think that progress has been made by two flames that have always been burning in the human heart. The flame of anger against injustice and the flame of hope that you can build a better world" - Tony Benn

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Originally posted by McCloud


                      The decision as to which patients will get a hospital bed will now be made on the basis of the ability to pay rather than clinical need, he said.


                      The first thing they ask you at A &amp; E in Limerick is are you with VHI/BUPA, etc. Totally agree with Balla Boy that the NHS is streets ahead of the health service here in Ireland and that is from personal experience.
                      Nothing ventured, nothing gained.

                      Comment


                        #12
                        Originally posted by Balla Boy





                        I know it has it's flaws (plenty of them) but every time I look at the Irish health system I'm grateful for the NHS.


                        GIven the amount the goverment here spends on the provision of universal healthcare, and the amount of the tax spend that it makes up, I'm amazed that the Irish govt can justify taxation levels without offering something comparable.


                        Not denying our hospital system is not an unholy mess, but Ball there was a dispatches programrecentlyly about the NHS entitled "where did all the money go"....apparently they have wasted billions also


                        Didnt see ...wonder if you did?


                        Comment


                          #13
                          Originally posted by Balla Boy


                          I know it has it's flaws (plenty of them) but every time I look at the Irish health system I'm grateful for the NHS.


                          GIven the amount the goverment here spends on the provision of universal healthcare, and the amount of the tax spend that it makes up, I'm amazed that the Irish govt can justify taxation levels without offering something comparable.


                          B B, I've had personal experience of6 different public health systems all over Europe. From my experience the NHS now vies with Ireland for the bottom rung (NHS is now probably better, but 15 years ago there were some major problems). Italy, Holland France and Germany(not necessarily in that order) are miles ahead (&amp; don't cost as much).


                          You mentioned the amount spent. That has nothing to do with the problem. We are now spending 5 times as much, yet we now have a much worse service that10 years ago. As an example, there are facilities, equipment, qualified personnel lieing idle in Monaghan, yet they are not allowed carry out operations. This is actually money being spent anyway;in this instance thepolicy has already cost a fair number of lives, just because some bureaucrat has made (&amp; is sticking by) a crazy decision.


                          The west complained about the centralised soviet system that creatd the Gulags; we have our own version here. It's time the bureacrats and vested interestswere taken on.

                          Comment


                            #14


                            Perhaps if our "Health Service" concentrated on solely on health, rather than involving itself in matters more related to other departments. Education / Immigration / Job Placements / Justice / Social Housing,etc..


                            One case in point: ScumbagFamilies who are evicted by local councils for consistent anti-social behaviour/drug dealing, etc.are given a better standardhome usually in a quiet area by the Health Service, then the scumbring that area downhill and locals are given two fingers! go figure that, and there are many more examples of HSE interference in matters outside of what should be their sole remit : Health.


                            In the meantime our hospitalA&amp;E's resemble a scene from M*A*S*Hwhile the fear of going into hospital to have an ingrown toenail dealt with and coming out in a box thanks to the virulent strains of MRSA in the filthy wards are incredibly real. All fine telling the door-knockers what to do in the coming weeks (and I will), but the entire HSE is a multi-billion euro self regulating waste of money where the only hand-washing is done by its Army of Publicists.


                            Politicians simply don't have the balls to take on the Medical profession and the civil service within the HSE.[img]smileys/mad.gif[/img]

                            Comment


                              #15
                              Originally posted by Speebs
                              Originally posted by Balla Boy





                              I know it has it's flaws (plenty of them) but every time I look at the Irish health system I'm grateful for the NHS.


                              GIven the amount the goverment here spends on the provision of universal healthcare, and the amount of the tax spend that it makes up, I'm amazed that the Irish govt can justify taxation levels without offering something comparable.


                              Not denying our hospital system is not an unholy mess, but Ball there was a dispatches programrecentlyly about the NHS entitled "where did all the money go"....apparently they have wasted billions also


                              Didnt see ...wonder if you did?





                              Didn't see it, but I work very closely with the NHS and there's no doubt that a good deal of money has been wasted. The structures in place are very close to the ones that were in operaton before an 8 year cycle of reform, though some of the functions differ.


                              Those changes have cost a lot of money, and not all have been successful. But most of the money has gone on pay rises for nurses and doctors, which people were crying out for for years.


                              Some elements are still shaky - mental health provision is poor, and it's budgetsdiverted to pay for acute treatments. The management of long term illness isn't really on a par with acute treatment and the movement from hospital settings to community based services for diagnostics, testing, scanning, minorelective surgeryetc needs to be accelerated.


                              But on the whole, things aren't as bad as they're portrayed. The service is in balance - the vast majority of deficits sit with a small number of organisations, and surpluses elsewhere balance them out. Waiting lists are way down on where they were a few years ago and people can access some of the world's leadingexperitse in areas like cancer and transplantation free at the point of delivery.


                              BUPA, though they wouldn't admit it in public, are s**tting themselves about the improvements in NHS services. Bord meetings there have speculatedon a possible reduction of 60% in the size of their business over the next 10 years. That says a lot, I think.


                              I'mglad that I don't have to worry about my ability to payfor services that Iuse, and I've probably had4 or 5 a&amp;e admissions in the last ten years from rugby injuries. In addition, a fairly extensive programme of surgery on my left armwas all delivered without any waiting.


                              I know it's not free - I pay for it through National Insurance. But as far as I can gather, people are paying asmuch tax in Ireland and getting nothing.
                              "We will not walk in fear, one of another. We will not be driven into an age of unreason if we dig deep into our history and remember we are not descended from fearful men" Edward R Murrow

                              "Little by little, we have been brought into the present condition in which we are able neither to tolerate the evils from which we suffer, nor the remedies we need to cure them." - Livy


                              "I think that progress has been made by two flames that have always been burning in the human heart. The flame of anger against injustice and the flame of hope that you can build a better world" - Tony Benn

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