Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Chief’s mate emerges from his cave again!

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    Chief’s mate emerges from his cave again!




    <TABLE cellSpacing=0 cellPadding=0 width=300 summary="for layout purposes"><T>
    <T>
    <TR>
    <TD vAlign=top>Croker will never be a GAA stadium again</TD></TR></T></T></TABLE>






    <TABLE cellSpacing=0 cellPadding=0 width=300 summary="for layout purposes">
    <COLGROUP>
    <COL width=298><T>
    <T>
    <TR>
    <TD vAlign=top>Two cent with. . . Micéal Greenan</TD></TR></T></T></TABLE>


    I CAN'T say I watched England play rugby at Croke Park last Saturday. I can't say I heard any other national anthems played in Croke Park either. Luckily enough I had better things to do and if I didn't, I'd be in trouble. But that's not to say it doesn't bother me greatly. People who know me realise I speak my mind, they know I shoot from the hip but they also know I'm honest and I have the very best interest of Gaelic games at heart. Unfortunately others don't and down the line the GAA will be in trouble. The door has been opened in Croke Park and I don't think there is any way to close it.





    This is not about England or the history of the stadium. It's about us helping our competitors gain an upper hand and I don't think a lot of GAA people realise how serious the consequences are going to be in years to come.


    Sure, we are making money out of all this, but rugby and soccer will be making three times as much. They'll have far more than us to pump into their facilities around the country and to win over youngsters who are choosing which sport they want to achieve in.


    What's really annoyed me over the past while is that you can't have anything other than a positive view. If you complain and speak your mind, there's something wrong with you. You are not acting in the best interests of sport and of Ireland. I've never seen the like of the triumphalism I've had to put up with all week. And if I hear another person mention the money we got to build Croke Park. . . The taxpayer's money has gone into Croke Park but with the amount of money the government got in tax, PAYE and PRSI when Croke Park was being built, well, we just got some of that back.


    That's number one, number two is this: other sports got the same and we got that money to do up Croke Park because we couldn't have had the Special Olympics here without the GAA and Croke Park. They gave a lot of money to soccer and rugby and they had to do nothing with it, just pocket it and walk away.


    Up to a few weeks ago, Croke Park was a GAA stadium. That's gone now and it will never be a GAA stadium again. Why? Because any logical individual will have doubts over whether Lansdowne Road will ever be built.


    I hear our Minister for Sport this week suggesting that Croke Park might have to be opened into 2009. This is an extra year and they haven't even got planning permission for Lansdowne yet. To John O'Donoghue I would say, we don't tell the government how to run the country so I don't think it's any of their business, telling people how to run the GAA.


    But in the GAA, we are not looking after our own. The people in our association want to play in Croke Park and they should be allowed.


    You look at ladies' football, they only have a provisional date for the All Ireland finals in 2007 in Croke Park. Yet they are promoting other games, soccer and rugby, games that are in opposition to us and they have assured dates for 2008. Now where is the logic in that? We can't play our Ulster final in Croke Park this year and we are going to lose money that we have pumped into it. There is no fairness in this.


    And it's not a question of the others having to play abroad. Couldn't they play in Dalymount Park, didn't they play there for years? It's plenty big, sure aren't the pitch dimensions perfect. If you're talking about size of cr
    New infraction avoidance policy: a post may be described as imbecilic, but its author should never be described as an imbecile.

    #2


    Jeez, I've read that article twice now and I'm not really sure what he is saying - is he for or against the opening of CP to rugby and soccer? Very hard to tell altogether.

    Comment


      #3


      In a way I'm tempted to nit-pick at practically everything this guy has to say, but why bother.


      One thing he says that galls me is the notion that kids have only one option when it comes to sport. I know it's a bit cliched of Limerick and probably Cork and some other parts, but I can only speak for myself. Before the acceptance of booze and pursuit of women took over I played or took part inRugby, Soccer, Gaelic, Volleyball, Basketball, Hurling, Rowing all at competitive level with varying degrees of failure. Loved every minute of it - on reflection even training wasn't too bad. I tried my hand at a dozen more sports and games. Loved some more than others, found my level, enjoyed the sports and still relate to the people I've met through that.


      Imagine that you had only played one or twosports becauseyou was told to by an overbearing parent such as Mr. Grennan must be, ignoring all others and feeding you a bellyful of hate every time you so much aspeeked at another "unapproved" pursuit.And despite all that you weren't cut out for it and the boots would have been hung up long before hitting your 20th. What do you become - the youngest man on the Club Committee spending the rest of your days continuing with the bitter tirade agin' furrin' games and collecting glasses at the Club.


      Point is, it shouldn't cross any young person's mind to concentrate solely on one sport or healthy activity. I get the impression from Micheal Greenan's article that if a kid turns his back on Gaelic Games, he'd be as well of taking Crack Cocaine rather than despised "other" sports.


      ffs, does he think we should be rearing robots. Is Mr Greenans ideal solution one where you ask your kid "Where are you going?".....


      .."We're playing an Under 16 Cup match out in Garryowen"....


      "Feck that, here's a hurley and sliothar, go down and beat that off a gable end for an hour and when you come back I'll give you €20 for drink"


      Was that man ever young himself oris it the Gripewater that made him so bitter.

      Comment


        #4
        He's only getting warmed up. From hoganstand.com.

        <h2>Greenan blasts ’cheeky’ Minister</h2>
        07 March 2007

        GAA presidential hopeful Michael
        Greenan has accused Sports Minister John O’Donoghue of being ’cheeky’
        for encouraging the GAA to keep Croke Park open to other sports in 2009.

        The
        outspoken Cavan man, who completed his three-year term as Ulster
        Council chairman last week, was strongly opposed to the decision to
        open up Croke Park to rugby and soccer, claiming that the GAA had been
        “hoodwinked from day one” on the issue.

        Greenan blasted: “The
        Minister is now telling us what we should be doing in 2009. We’ve never
        told the Government how to run the country.

        “I wasn’t surprised – with politicians coming up to election time you wouldn’t be surprised about anything.” @@@@SPAN style="color: rgb(255, 0, 0);">(Says the man eyeing up Nickey Brennans job)@@@@/SPAN>

        Greenan is also angered at the decisions to exclude Gaelic games from Lansdowne Road and the new stadium in Tallaght.

        “The
        reality is that the Government is building a stadium for them (the IRFU
        and FAI) in Lansdowne Road that we were told we would be catered for in
        and we’re not.

        “They’re also building a stadium in Tallaght that we’re supposed to be in, and we’re not.”

        Grandpa Simpson: The last time the meteors came, we thought the sky was on fire. Naturally, we blamed the Irish. We hanged more \'n a few.

        Comment


          #5
          What did he do with his tickets?
          The Beatings Will Continue Until Morale Improves

          Comment


            #6
            He fed them to his pigs.
            Grandpa Simpson: The last time the meteors came, we thought the sky was on fire. Naturally, we blamed the Irish. We hanged more \'n a few.

            Comment


              #7
              Is that some sort of nordie code for flogging them to "those dirty british b*****ds that stole our potatoes"?
              The Beatings Will Continue Until Morale Improves

              Comment


                #8
                No. It means he fed them to his pigs.
                Grandpa Simpson: The last time the meteors came, we thought the sky was on fire. Naturally, we blamed the Irish. We hanged more \'n a few.

                Comment


                  #9
                  So those rashers withthe IRFU hologram...they're OK?

                  Comment


                    #10
                    The pigs all died. He reckons the IRFU dipped the tickets in cyanide before sending them on. Lucky for him he only ever handled them with a set of steel tongs.</font>
                    Grandpa Simpson: The last time the meteors came, we thought the sky was on fire. Naturally, we blamed the Irish. We hanged more \'n a few.

                    Comment


                      #11





                      Steel thongs more likely, knowing that looper.
                      New infraction avoidance policy: a post may be described as imbecilic, but its author should never be described as an imbecile.

                      Comment


                        #12
                        He won't be hoodwinked by the likes of you OD.
                        Grandpa Simpson: The last time the meteors came, we thought the sky was on fire. Naturally, we blamed the Irish. We hanged more \'n a few.

                        Comment


                          #13




                          <!-
                          var SymReal&#079;nLoad;
                          var SymReal;

                          Sym()
                          {
                          window.open = SymWinOpen;
                          if(SymReal != null)
                          SymReal();
                          }

                          Sym&#079;nLoad()
                          {
                          if(SymReal&#079;nLoad != null)
                          SymReal&#079;nLoad();
                          window.open = SymRealWinOpen;
                          SymReal = window.;
                          window. = Sym;
                          }

                          SymReal&#079;nLoad = window.&#111;nload;
                          window.&#111;nload = Sym&#079;nLoad;

                          //->

                          I wouldn't agree with everything the guy says, but I do agree with some of it.


                          For example, very few replies above really address what he is saying, rambling though it is. Most replies attack the guy and offer gratuitous insults.


                          I believe opening Croker was the correct thing to do. Yes they get some dosh, and some well deserved credit. But it has given at least one its competitor sports a fantastic and glamorous showcase. That's a fact. Yet anyone that suggests this, as the poster suggests, is labelled negative, backward-thinking, etc.


                          I remember Eamonn Dunphy, years ago, used to refer to Official Ireland (before he came part of it!). He used to complain when the media bandwagon would label something or other a Good Thing, and God help any critter who dared hold a contrary view.


                          Well I welcome contrary views. At least they make discussion forums truer to their name!





                          "I don't believe in fairytales," O'Connell once told me, "even though it feels like I've been lucky enough to live through a few. However it ends, I'll feel lucky."
                          Donald McRae, Guardian Rugby, October 2015

                          Comment


                            #14





                            There is a single, fatal, flaw to the poor bewildered loon's logic:- - if the games that he espouses are inherently good of themselves, then people will continue to play and watch them - and if they are not, they will not.


                            Anyone who fears the that the present Irish Soccer team represents a realistic threat to Gaelic Games is either a looper or has a pretty poor opinion of Gaelic Football as a sport.


                            New infraction avoidance policy: a post may be described as imbecilic, but its author should never be described as an imbecile.

                            Comment


                              #15
                              Originally posted by blackwarrior


                              <!-
                              var SymReal&#079;nLoad;
                              var SymReal;

                              Sym()
                              {
                              window.open = SymWinOpen;
                              if(SymReal != null)
                              SymReal();
                              }

                              Sym&#079;nLoad()
                              {
                              if(SymReal&#079;nLoad != null)
                              SymReal&#079;nLoad();
                              window.open = SymRealWinOpen;
                              SymReal = window.;
                              window. = Sym;
                              }

                              SymReal&#079;nLoad = window.&#111;nload;
                              window.&#111;nload = Sym&#079;nLoad;

                              //->But it has given at least one its competitor sports a fantastic and glamorous showcase. That's a fact.


                              Dont agree with the showcase line for a second. What is the nature of the showcase, and to whom is it directed? Irish kids know that the GAA own CP, and that after next year rugby and soccer won't be played there and will already have seen it through watching GAA. Why would they suddenly want to abandon playing/supporting GAA just because HQ has a few temporary tenants playing there for a while? The only thing that was showcased, as Mick Galwey said,was the country of Ireland, and I don't think anyone in the GAA is worried about the impact of having rugby played in CP on the nascent hurling communitiesin Catania or Bayonne.

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X