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    Tom Humphries

    Whats the c**k saying about Rugby atmospheres now?




    #2


    Why are we so sensitive whent others say or write that don't enjoy rugby, don't think the experinece of attending a game is all that it is promoted to be? Why do we feel a need that others embrace the game we love as we do? Do we need their validation?


    Humphries is always agood read, and I will enjoy reading his put-down and humerous asides about the game on Sat., even if I don't share them.

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      #3
      Thought yesterdays article was poor, obvious sour grapes to the fact that actually every thing when off fine and dandy, the rugby fans were being praised, and AnabhF was sung better than ever before at Croker. A bitter fat man.

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        #4


        Originally posted by RobbieG
        Thought yesterdays article was poor, obvious sour grapes to the fact that actually every thing when off fine and dandy, the rugby fans were being praised, and AnabhF was sung better than ever before at Croker. A bitter fat man.

        Could do with shaving off the bum fluff on his face as well

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          #5


          I find it surprising that people don't rant more about his articles. He gets up my nose. His articles on football or hurling aren't much good and everyone seems to have some connection with Dublin and Saint Vincents. His piece on Monday given the weekend that was in it was very poor I thought.....I wasn't as irritated as I normally am! His review of the sports year at Christmas annoyed me hugely. In addressing rugby he happened to have a snide go at Limerick and was quite nasty. I stopped buying the paper for a month. Come on Ireland.

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            #6
            The Man is a Tool.
            I distrust Camels and anybody else that go for 7 days without a drink

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              #7
              He looks like something out of Punch magazine, no wonder the BBC let him onto their coverage.

              Ape.

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                #8
                The SJ of Irish journalism? Or is that already the reserve of Neill Francis?
                Insanity: doing the same thing over and over again (like picking Gordon D'Arcy) and expecting different results.
                Albert Einstein

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                  #9
                  Can someone post his article?

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                    #10


                    Yeah, can somebody put it up? Couldn't getthe ITover and wanted to see if he'd eat his words or just continue to trot out the cliches about flash cars andBarbour jackets.


                    It wasfairly funny when he came on the BBC talking about Croke Park before the game.A Scottish mate of minetook one look at him and asked "Who's that lad? He looks like a tramp."[img]smileys/lol.gif[/img]

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                      #11
                      <h1>What sort of place for kicking is Croker?</h1>

                      Tom Humphries
                      Monday, February 26, 2007


                      Locker Room: It was surprising to read in
                      yesterday's sports pages that, after all the fanfare, Jonny
                      Wilkinson had a quiet and unproductive day in Croke Park on
                      Saturday.

                      Through no fault of his own, Wilkinson never got to continue his
                      renaissance by means of a kicking duel which might have told us the
                      truth about how intimidating an atmosphere Croke Park really
                      is.

                      A lot of the guff and puff written about Croker in the past few
                      weeks suggested that, because of the place the stadium holds in our
                      hearts, it would automatically be a cauldron or a fortress. I don't
                      know how it was on Saturday against the more traditional foe and
                      with all those undercurrents of history swirling, but for the
                      French game the atmosphere seemed tame and the rugby pitch's
                      geographical remove from the stands seemed to inhibit the audience
                      a little.

                      The 5.30pm start on Saturday would have ensured that a little
                      more drinking got done in the afternoon and a little more roaring
                      and bellowing should have ensued. Yet apart from reports of some
                      early booing of Wilkinson as he lined up a kick, Croke Park never
                      got to see the man's legendary sangfroid being tested.

                      Pity. We'd spent some time on Saturday watching a preview of
                      tomorrow night's Laochra Gael edition on Charlie Redmond and
                      listening to Charlie, still a natural showman, describe his
                      place-kicking routine in Croker in detail.

                      Between the piseogs for practising and the elaborate
                      choreography of his run-up, including a couple of licks of his
                      right glove, Charlie was to place-kicking what De Niro is to method
                      acting.

                      Charlie's missed penalties became a matter of legend back in the
                      early 1990s, and to his credit he could laugh about them then and
                      he can laugh about them still. His free-taking was more bankable,
                      but, even with the frees, the thrill of watching Charlie was
                      knowing that he was so porous a character. He absorbed everything.
                      The mood of the crowd, the circumstances of the game, his immediate
                      history. His addiction to method reassured him, but he never quite
                      managed to make kicking an act removed from the rest of life, just
                      a simple, mechanical process.

                      Who could? In our time maybe Jimmy Keaveney and Matt Connor were
                      the coolest free-takers. It's still astonishing to think that
                      Matt's 161 games for Offaly yielded 82 goals and 660 points, as
                      well as that 1980 dismantlement of the Kerry backs. (There were
                      county teams who scored less in that span than Matt did
                      single-handedly.)

                      And yet from the lives of Keaveney and Connor there are no
                      conclusions to be drawn about place-kicking. Matt Connor liked to
                      practise all the time in front of a goal, relentlessly honing his
                      accuracy. Jimmy could take or leave it, but would stroke a few over
                      at the end of a training session, as much, one suspects, to be seen
                      to be doing a little bit as actually needing to.

                      In Croke Park they were both impeccable, and it's still a
                      surprise if you look at old footage to see either man miss a
                      kick.

                      That's why it would have been nice if circumstances had brought
                      the great Wilkinson to the point in Croke Park where he had one big
                      pressure kick with it all on the line. This is a guy, after all,
                      who, the old story goes, realised when he was a kid that his right
                      foot was less effective when kicking and bought a video of Gavin
                      Hastings to study for hours.

                      Forget all the history and having to forgo the pleasure of
                      walloping England, it would have told us something about Croke Park
                      and what sort of a place it is. I imagine for a visiting player,
                      despite the polite comments and the nods to history, it is just
                      another stadium, and the openness and asymmetry of the Hill 16 end
                      probably diminish the place's potential to be an actual cauldron.
                      It will be nice to measure the atmosphere th

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                        #12
                        Post the offending article!!!!!!!!!

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                          #13
                          i don't know if that's the offending article but if it is i can't see anything wrong with it.

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                            #14
                            I found nothing at all disagreeable in his comments. The atmosphere at the French game was far from being "special" in my opinion.

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                              #15
                              Thanks for posing the article... I didn't find that offensive in any way... just a little off-point given the weekend that was in it..

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