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    Banned!!!
    Tis but a scratch.

    Comment


      Originally posted by mr chips View Post
      That's no longer true Piquet.
      What's "no longer true"?

      By the way, Hydrogen can, relatively easily, be got by the electrolysis of water.

      Comment


        Originally posted by Piquet View Post

        Cars aren't, and never will be, cleaner than Public Transport per person.
        I never said they were!


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        "I don't believe in fairytales," O'Connell once told me, "even though it feels like I've been lucky enough to live through a few. However it ends, I'll feel lucky."
        Donald McRae, Guardian Rugby, October 2015

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          I never said you did.

          Comment


            Originally posted by Piquet View Post
            I never said you did.
            Separately, saying that water vapour is a greenhouse gas is correct, but there’s no evidence that increased water vapour has any effect on temperature.


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            "I don't believe in fairytales," O'Connell once told me, "even though it feels like I've been lucky enough to live through a few. However it ends, I'll feel lucky."
            Donald McRae, Guardian Rugby, October 2015

            Comment


              That's what a Greenhous Gas is. It inhibits the Heat Transfer from the Earth into space, causing the Earth's temperature to be higher.

              Comment


                Originally posted by Piquet View Post
                That's what a Greenhous Gas is. It inhibits the Heat Transfer from the Earth into space, causing the Earth's temperature to be higher.
                Increased water also leads to increased cloud formation which deflects sunlight back into space, also reducing the amount of sun radiation hitting the earth’s surface. Both of these have a negative effect on temperature. So just calling water vapour a greenhouse gas doesn’t tell the whole story.


                Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
                "I don't believe in fairytales," O'Connell once told me, "even though it feels like I've been lucky enough to live through a few. However it ends, I'll feel lucky."
                Donald McRae, Guardian Rugby, October 2015

                Comment


                  Like the glass in a Greenhouse, water vapour and the other Greenhouse Gases allows the (high temperature) radiation from the Sun in but not the (low temperature) radiation from the Earth out.

                  It's more likely to be frosty at night with a clear sky than with a cloudy one.

                  Comment


                    Originally posted by Piquet View Post
                    Like the glass in a Greenhouse, water vapour and the other Greenhouse Gases allows the (high temperature) radiation from the Sun in but not the (low temperature) radiation from the Earth out.

                    It's more likely to be frosty at night with a clear sky than with a cloudy one.
                    Water vapour does not act like the glass in a greenhouse. What about the two positive effects I listed? The “greenhouse effect” is an analogy, not a scientific term.


                    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
                    "I don't believe in fairytales," O'Connell once told me, "even though it feels like I've been lucky enough to live through a few. However it ends, I'll feel lucky."
                    Donald McRae, Guardian Rugby, October 2015

                    Comment


                      Originally posted by blackwarrior View Post

                      Water vapour does not act like the glass in a greenhouse.
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                      It does.

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                        Originally posted by Piquet View Post

                        It does.
                        Not in its totality.


                        Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
                        "I don't believe in fairytales," O'Connell once told me, "even though it feels like I've been lucky enough to live through a few. However it ends, I'll feel lucky."
                        Donald McRae, Guardian Rugby, October 2015

                        Comment


                          Water vapour (not clouds which are made up of water droplets) has been the main controller of the Earth's temperature since the beginning.

                          It's a delicate balance, though and the recent build-up of CO​​​​​2​ and CH​​4​​​​ in the atmosphere has upset things leading to Climate Change.
                          Last edited by Piquet; 1st-February-2020, 17:20. Reason: Typo

                          Comment


                            Originally posted by blackwarrior View Post

                            Not in its totality.


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                            In its effect on the Earth's temperature, it does.

                            Comment


                              Originally posted by Piquet View Post

                              In its effect on the Earth's temperature, it does.
                              Temperature possibly but not global warming.

                              Also water vapour doesn’t stay in the atmosphere very long so its long term impact is nothing line other GHGs. That’s what’s important in climate change.


                              Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
                              "I don't believe in fairytales," O'Connell once told me, "even though it feels like I've been lucky enough to live through a few. However it ends, I'll feel lucky."
                              Donald McRae, Guardian Rugby, October 2015

                              Comment


                                So temperature and Global Warming are not related?

                                Water vapour is always present in the atmosphere.

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