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    have to admit ive wondered about this type of thing before

    Man ruptures throat by stifling a sneeze

    Stifling a sneeze by clamping your nose and mouth shut can cause serious physical damage, doctors are warning.
    Medics in Leicester treated a 34-year-old man who ruptured his throat while trying to stop a high-force sneeze.
    With nowhere to escape, the pressure ripped through the soft tissue, and although rare and unusual, they say others should be aware of the danger.
    Trapping a sneeze could also damage the ears or even rupture a brain aneurysm, they warn in journal BMJ Case Reports.
    The man said he felt a "popping" sensation in his neck when it happened and then immediately experienced pain and difficulty swallowing and speaking.
    When the doctors checked him over they found he had swelling and tenderness around his throat and neck.


    http://www.bbc.com/news/health-42687970
    "Some people don't know their easy lives... I wouldn't be so ungrateful" - Fiacre Ryan - #AutismAndMe

    Comment


      Originally posted by Hugged Rugger View Post
      have to admit ive wondered about this type of thing before

      Man ruptures throat by stifling a sneeze

      Stifling a sneeze by clamping your nose and mouth shut can cause serious physical damage, doctors are warning.
      Medics in Leicester treated a 34-year-old man who ruptured his throat while trying to stop a high-force sneeze.
      With nowhere to escape, the pressure ripped through the soft tissue, and although rare and unusual, they say others should be aware of the danger.
      Trapping a sneeze could also damage the ears or even rupture a brain aneurysm, they warn in journal BMJ Case Reports.
      The man said he felt a "popping" sensation in his neck when it happened and then immediately experienced pain and difficulty swallowing and speaking.
      When the doctors checked him over they found he had swelling and tenderness around his throat and neck.


      http://www.bbc.com/news/health-42687970
      I once put my back out trying to suppress a sneeze, since then I am the loudest sneezer you will ever hear. There is a massive amount of force behind a sneeze, it is one of the few occasions that human beings fully engage the power of their diaphragm.


      Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro

      Comment


        Originally posted by the plastic paddy View Post
        I once put my back out trying to suppress a sneeze, since then I am the loudest sneezer you will ever hear. There is a massive amount of force behind a sneeze, it is one of the few occasions that human beings fully engage the power of their diaphragm.


        Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro
        When my back is out I'm terrified of sneezing, it's like "oh god this is going to hurt".

        Comment


          They just fixed a headline on the RTE site from "Motorists urged to take cure due to snowy conditions".
          What odds they publish copy directly from their phones?

          Comment


            Originally posted by Fantom View Post
            When my back is out I'm terrified of sneezing, it's like "oh god this is going to hurt".
            Had a cracked sternum once. I'd have taken a punch to the balls over a sneeze while that was healing up!

            Comment


              swiss-town-denies-passport-to-dutch-vegan-because-she-is-annoying

              https://uk.news.yahoo.com/swiss-town...125316437.html
              Nulla semper amicus, servivit mihi, in iniuriam mihi neminem quem non persolvi

              Comment


                Brilliant!!!


                Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro

                Comment


                  Joke doesn't work if the woman is not caucasian
                  Last edited by Fantom; 17th-January-2018, 16:56.

                  Comment


                    Sh*t a brick: doctors swallow Lego to allay parents' fears

                    A team of doctors who swallowed Lego and timed how long it took to pass through their bowels say the results of their research should reassure concerned parents.

                    In a paper published in the Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health, six researchers from Australia and the UK swallowed the head of a Lego figure – roughly 10mm by 10mm – in the “noble tradition of self-experimentation”.

                    Toy parts are the second most common foreign object that children swallow, and frequently cause anxiety among parents, but usually pass in a matter of days without pain or ill-effect.

                    For the special Christmas edition of the journal, which frequently features quirky studies, the team decided to put their own bodies on the line. “[We] could not ask anything of our test subjects that we would not undertake themselves,” they wrote in their paper.

                    They developed their own metrics: the Stool Hardness and Transit (Shat) score and the Found and Retrieved Time (Fart) score.

                    The Fart score – how many days it took the Lego to pass through the bowels – was between 1.1 days and three days, with an average of 1.7 days.

                    Using the Shat score, the researchers also found the consistency of their stools did not change. They compared Shat and Fart scores to see if looser stools caused quicker retrieval but found no correlation.

                    One of the report’s authors, Grace Leo, said she hoped the report made people smile while also reassuring parents. She said parents should seek medical advice if children swallow things that are sharp, longer than 5cm, wider than 2.5cm, magnets, coins, button batteries or are experiencing pain.

                    But most small, smooth, plastic objects will pass easily.

                    If parents are uncertain, they should seek medical attention, Leo added.

                    “I can’t remember if it was pre or post-breakfast,” she said. “But we all ingested our Lego between 7am and 9am in our own time zone, with a glass of water.

                    “For most people it was passed after one to three stools. But for poor [researcher Damien Roland], he didn’t find his, so we made him search every stool for two weeks. I passed it on the first stool afterwards and was very relieved.”

                    None of the researchers experienced any symptoms or pain due to the Lego inside them. But Leo said people should not replicate the experiment at home.

                    The report noted that it was possible children’s bowels would react differently but there was “little evidence to support this”.

                    “If anything, it is likely that objects would pass faster in a more immature gut,” they wrote.

                    Leo said: “Hopefully there is more conversation and awareness of foreign bodies, and a reassurance for parents that, for small foreign bodies, they aren’t advised to search through the stool.

                    “If it’s a small Lego head, you don’t need to go poking through their stool. That should save parents some heartache, unless that Lego head is dearly loved.”







                    Tis but a scratch.

                    Comment


                      Its actyally better reading the link in the LEGO story - with diagrams:
                      The Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health
                      Seven social sins: politics without principles, wealth without work, pleasure without conscience, knowledge without character, commerce without morality, science without humanity, and worship without sacrifice



                      Comment

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