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    The first foreign sport at Croke Park?

    Michael Cusack's invention gave the impression that it originated in
    the mists of time, but it was a hybrid game that made it to
    headquarters ahead of rugby and soccer, writes Con Houlihan





    Douglas Hyde (left) was dismissed from the association for attending a
    soccer international in his capacity as president; Michael Cusack
    founded the hybrid game of Gaelic football.



    Kerry were due to play Louth in the All-Ireland Final of 1910 but the
    game didn't take place. Kerry refused to travel - they deemed the rail
    facilities inadequate.



    And so it wasn't until the January of 1911 that the GAA headquarters
    first housed a "foreign" game. The honour fell to Cork and Antrim.



    The game was doubly "foreign": Michael Cusack had invented it by taking
    what he considered the better elements of soccer and rugby. He
    christened it Gaelic football. It was a masterstroke: it gave the
    impression that this game had its origin in the mists of time.



    Gaelic football and soccer couldn't have come into being without the
    invention of pneumatic rubber. I said that Gaelic football was
    compounded from soccer and rugby. That seemed less true of the new game
    in its early form: it was about as close to rugby as made little
    difference.



    You can see this for yourself by reading accounts of some early games.
    Here is an example from PD Mehigan's book, Gaelic Football: "Masses of
    men drove into each other while the fleeter of foot waited on the
    outskirts".



    This brings us to cad, a game, if you could call it that, about which a
    lot of nonsense has grown up. It was a kind of mass football. The teams
    assembled at a fixed point; the object of the game was to carry the
    ball over your opponents' goal-line.



    The goal-line could be a river or a stream or a ditch or a road; the
    play often went on over several fields. It was sometimes called
    cross-country football.



    The authorities didn't frown on the activity because it was slightly
    better than faction fighting, the curse of the 18th and 19th centuries
    in Ireland. It was, however, a fertile source of broken bones and the
    new game, Gaelic football, more or less wiped it out.



    A remarkable Catholic priest, Father Liam Ferris, attempted to have the
    ancient game revived and organised a game in the Christmas of 1926-'27.
    Teams from either side of the Cork-Kerry border did battle. A vast
    crowd watched. The occasion was a great success, pub lore tells us that
    the final score was 20 broken collarbones and 15 broken arms and 12
    broken legs. It was the final score in another sense: it was the last
    game of cad played - at least among adults.



    It survived here and there as a children's game: we played it in our
    school because the yard was too rough for Gaelic football. Our rules
    were simple: you weren't allowed to kick or throw the ball forward;
    passing and carrying and



    tackling were the elements of the game. We played with a sponge ball
    about the size of a big apple. We loved the crazy game but our mothers
    didn't - it was very hard on shirts and gansies.



    Father Ferris in a famous letter accused Michael Cusack of wiping out
    the ancient game with one stroke of a pen. Life went on and as you can
    see in the quotation from PD Mehigan's book, the early form of Gaelic
    football was cad in an enclosed space. And of course Cusack kept making
    little changes until rugby was wedded with soccer.



    Rugby was popular in many parts of Ireland, especially in Kerry, until
    the new game began to dominate. Gaelic football quickly spread because
    it was easier to play and much safer. Soon many rugby clubs changed
    over to the new game. Laune Rangers in Kerry were an example: they
    contested the All-Ireland final in 1893, shortly after they had changed
    over.



    The whole idea of rugby being a foreign game is total nonsense - as if
    it mattered. A Documentary called
    Seven social sins: politics without principles, wealth without work, pleasure without conscience, knowledge without character, commerce without morality, science without humanity, and worship without sacrifice




    #2
    Notre Dame vs Navy 1996 neither team from Ireland but not
    considered a foreign game?
    No signature

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      #3
      To those of you referring to "foreign games". There is no reference to foreign games in the GAA rulebook.
      Grandpa Simpson: The last time the meteors came, we thought the sky was on fire. Naturally, we blamed the Irish. We hanged more \'n a few.

      Comment


        #4


        Originally posted by scotscor


        Alas, the Ban gardaĆ­ remain. A spokesman for Limerick County Board has told us that their splendid stadium will not throw open its gates. It would bring great benefit all around but some people do not see it that way.

        Their attitude is rooted in the belief that Britain is our enemy: the truth is that the people of that island are our best friends. If soccer and rugby had originated in France or elsewhere apart from Britain, would they be deemed foreign games?

        Insecure underachievershave always needed someone to hate (remember pre- beer hall putsch Hitler or 1984'shate week?). For micks, the Brits were/are a very convenient hate figure.


        Iawait CCHA's response to the Limerick bit.














        New infraction avoidance policy: a post may be described as imbecilic, but its author should never be described as an imbecile.

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          #5


          Nothing splendid about the gaelic grounds either. Its extremely basic on the 3 sides that have been renovated and the stand is less than basic, its downright terrible.


          It has a big capacity, but nothing more to boast about.


          Thomond Park will be vastly superior when redeveloped.


          Comment


            #6
            Call it what you like they're still only playing the guys in the next parish. [img]smileys/biggrin.gif[/img]

            Comment


              #7


              Originally posted by Chief
              To those of you referring to "foreign games". There is no reference to foreign games in the GAA rulebook.

              Nit picking. There wasn't any reference to genocide in the Constitution of the Third Reich either.
              New infraction avoidance policy: a post may be described as imbecilic, but its author should never be described as an imbecile.

              Comment


                #8

                Originally posted by Old Dog

                Originally posted by Chief
                To those of you referring to "foreign games". There is no reference to foreign games in the GAA rulebook.

                Nit picking. There wasn't any reference to genocide in the Constitution of the Third Reich either.
                Ah, but they didn't need a constitution when they had their little black book Mein Kampf, did they?

                The GAA is all tied up with the de-Anglicisation movement anyway; why it can't remember that we're not an English colony any more is beyond me.
                Time And Relative Dimensions In Space

                Comment


                  #9

                  Originally posted by Old Dog

                  Originally posted by Chief
                  To those of you referring to "foreign games". There is no reference to foreign games in the GAA rulebook.

                  Nit picking. There wasn't any reference to genocide in the Constitution of the @@@@SPAN style="font-weight: bold;">Third Reich@@@@/SPAN> either.
                  BAN HIM! There will be no talk of them lads. Where have you been the last week?
                  Grandpa Simpson: The last time the meteors came, we thought the sky was on fire. Naturally, we blamed the Irish. We hanged more \'n a few.

                  Comment


                    #10

                    At the end of the day (as Roy would say),
                    we can't blame the GAA because they have sports' grounds with spectator capacity that we would hope for.

                    Comment


                      #11


                      I'll see your Houlihan an draise you you a Humphreys......


                      We built it - and they are coming

                      The Visitors will not fail to be impressed by the home of Irish sport, writes Tom Humphries

                      'The visitor's are coming, the place is spick and span, and the overwhelming feeling is of anticipation and quiet pride.'
                      On some Sunday afternoons visitors were expected. The sort of visitors whose arrival had to be announced at least a week beforehand. Oul ones with powdered cheeks and bristling tashes who kissed you on the face like divas when they arrived. And their rosey-cheeked husbands who'd get a whiskey into them and demand to know what you intended to do with the rest of your life and which firm you wanted to do it with.

                      Sometimes they'd bring their kids with them. The kids were all brace-wearing overachievers.

                      Chess prodigies who were learning Japanese because that was the future. You'd gladly do time for the chance to injure one of them, but your parents would get to you before the cops could come so you just bided your time.

                      The week before the arrival of the visitors was a week spent in the ninth circle of hell working as a cleaner. Disinfecting and hoovering under your bed just in case The Visitors happened to go upstairs looking for the toilet, peek into the wrong room, snag, say, a pearl necklace on a hook behind your door and then have to get down on hands and knees looking for the pearls.

                      The objective of Pre-Visit week was to simulate a nuclear winter, to radically alter the atmosphere and appearance of the house so that it looked as if no form of being had ever lived there. The house became an eerie still life of plumped cushions, gleaming formica and dustless lampshades. The dog was extradited. Scruffy urchin friends were warned off calling to the door. A complicated gateaux sat virginally unfingered in the fridge waiting to be unveiled to an acclaim which would be rebuffed with modest assertions that such confections were just the work of a stolen moment.

                      There would be sugar lumps in a bowl and new jars of salad cream and haemorrhaging beetroots.

                      No milk bottle on the linened table, just a jug. No second helpings. No farting, belching or sly nose-picking. No kicking under the table and no sniggering above it. Plenty of pleases and thank yous and for God's sake look people in the eye when they speak to you, you're not a criminal. Yet.

                      Sunday then would be spent in a state of suspended animation with the permanent residents of the house on lockdown until such time as it was announced that "they're here". Upon the jingle jangle of that oul triangle inmates made their way to the door for the meeting and greeting ordeal and the inevitable speculation as to whether or not a fella had put on another bit of a stretch, speculation which was ended by the plaintive maternal lament that it's impossible to "keep him in trousers". You stared down at the carpet like a shamed crossdresser and so the visit began.

                      Croke Park has a new media conference room and floodlights which get tested almost every evening. The grass is being micro tended with sun lamps and encouraged by psychologists who work at making the grass feel better about itself. As GAA people await the moment when somebody peeping out from behind the net curtain says "they're here" there is a certain sense that regardless of how anyone feels about the visitors the house should look perfect.

                      The opening of Croke Park offers a new chance for the GAA. There's no way of measuring these things, but if you spend your time among the devotees of various sports you might come to the conclusion that there is a greater breadth and purity to the virulence, bigotry and begrudgery which flows against the GAA than there is emanating from some of the supposed brand leaders within the association.

                      That sense of entrenchment and a certain degree of cultural self-absorption has contributed to making
                      =========================
                      \"Our Association cannot be expected to accept a vista where the competing sporting organisations have no capital investment commitments, can exploit the value of their existing infrastructure and use our facilities as a cash cow, while investing their returns in games development\" - Liam Mulvihill.

                      Comment


                        #12





                        Watched it on Setanta and posted score updates in the chatroom for toyman. It wasn't up to much, tbh. A good comeback by the Todgers and some good saves by McConnell. Delighted to see Bertie givinghis beloved Dubs the kiss of death - that's 2 teams in 3 weeks he's jinxed. [img]smileys/lol.gif[/img]


                        The sending off seemed harsh.





                        I'll deal with Tom Humpy in the manana.


                        New infraction avoidance policy: a post may be described as imbecilic, but its author should never be described as an imbecile.

                        Comment


                          #13
                          For every visionary in the world like Con Houlihan, you will always have talented but hopelessly blind men such as Tom Humphries.

                          Comment


                            #14


                            Originally posted by Max Headroom
                            For every visionary in the world like Con Houlihan, you will always have talented but hopelessly blind men such as Tom Humphries.

                            [img]smileys/thumb-up.gif[/img]

                            Comment


                              #15
                              I had to laugh during the cumann na mbunscoll game at half-time with all the kids of foreign descent (including the son of Mike Brewer, former all-black). There were a few african kids on one side and they went from one end of the field to the other and scored a goal without picking the ball up once! It was hilarious. Everyone around me was laughing there heads off. The ould lad beside me reckoned it was the best bit of soccer we can expect to see in CP. Great to see them enjoying themselves though.
                              Grandpa Simpson: The last time the meteors came, we thought the sky was on fire. Naturally, we blamed the Irish. We hanged more \'n a few.

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