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  • Arthur Guinness
    replied
    For those of you who have strawberries and want a clean way of keeping them off the ground this seems to be a solution. I hadn’t come across them before. This seems to be the best deal as the prices can be all over the place. They don’t seem to deliver to the soon-to-be new member of the UN Security Council (loud cheering,caps being thrown in the air) though so that post box service will need to be used.

    https://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/B088H43M...oding=UTF8&me=



    Last edited by Arthur Guinness; 19-June-2020, 13:00.

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  • ustix
    replied
    Originally posted by mr chips View Post
    Your midlander pal, was he from somewhere in Uíbh Fhailí by any chance? I think at least one of our regulars is an egghead from there ...
    East Midlands from the plain of Cill Dara

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  • mr chips
    replied
    Your midlander pal, was he from somewhere in Uíbh Fhailí by any chance? I think at least one of our regulars is an egghead from there ...

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  • ustix
    replied
    Originally posted by mr chips View Post
    Never heard of that one! I've used crushed eggshells around delicate seedlings & plants (e.g. pea vines, lettuce etc) as a barrier for slugs & snails, plus they're supposed to be a good addition to your compost - the shells, that is. I never put anything like cheese, meat rinds, fish skins etc into the compost as they're much more likely to attract rats and my compost bin is only about 20 metres from a brook, so I have to exercise caution. Was there any explanation offered as to the reason for the whole egg?

    About 5 years ago I started planting out 150 smallish saplings & whips in addition to the 150 or so I had already planted up to that point. A couple of years later, I realised I would have to either transplant around 70-80 of them or lose them to being crushed by diggers. Couldn't countenance them being destroyed, so I transplanted all the ones that were at risk. On & off I've had to transplant some other trees here & there due to ongoing projects or only having a temporary home for them (like those oaks I mentioned), so although I've planted maybe 350 trees around here, I've probably relocated nearly 100 of them and only lost maybe 10 in that process. Still, it means that I've some trees reaching 20-25 feet now and plenty of others at the 12-15 foot stage, instead of having had mostly bare ground up to now.

    I started tackling moving the damson trees today - they're getting to 10 feet now, so I can't really leave it another year. The job involves using the fork (not a spade, to avoid cutting through any roots) to prise the topsoil out in a circle around the tree that's as wide as the span of the branches, then gradually getting under the root ball to gradually prise it up out of the soil without breaking the roots. Not too easy when the ground is as dry & hard as it is right now. One down, two to go - I just had to come in from the heat and am mainly sitting here writing about it as an excuse not to go back out & start the next one!
    A strange one. Two of us were replanting an appletree in a semi-public place. This fella, Midlander, appears with an egg and says it would provide nourishment when the roots in time would crack it open. Science or magic or both, I don't know. Possibly having a laugh. Piseog maybe but I doubt many eggs would have been diverted from human mouths historically. The tree had had three or four branches from different appletrees grafted onto it. Anyhows, its flourishing now ten years on in the same spot....

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  • mr chips
    replied
    Ha! Eh, no. I mentioned the short time out of the soil because the longer the roots are exposed to the air, the more likely the tree is to die. You can't just dig it out then decide to take a break before coming back to re-plant it, as it might not recover. Anyway, all three are in their new permanent locations so that's another job crossed off the list. Apparently a JCB-size digger will be here tomorrow, so hopefully I can get my third raised bed set up with slightly less effort than the other two!

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  • McCloud
    replied
    Originally posted by mr chips View Post
    The mini-digger I was expecting at the start of last week didn't arrive, so as well as driving all the stakes for the boards two feet into clay with a sledgehammer (there may have been a pick axe involved a few times too) I ended up digging and barrowing about 3.5 tonnes of topsoil by hand in order to finish the first couple of raised beds (I also had to lift & re-lay part of a patio this week - ah well, have to work off all the extra home-drinking somehow ...) Anyway, they're sowed out with spuds and beetroot now, although I still have prepare somewhere for the other 20+ seed potatoes I have left. If each one I've sowed thus far produces another 8-10, then I'll have around 400 to harvest which will definitely take us beyond the new year. The broad beans we sowed about 3 weeks ago started to appear above the surface a few days back, as have the onions & shallots. Still no sign of any peas though - might sow out a few more if there's no change by the end of the week.

    I'm hugely relieved to see that the oak trees I transplanted a few weeks back are all putting out leaves now. Seeing as I'm that bit further north, I'm thinking I might be able to get away with transplanting a few damson trees this week (don't think I would risk it beyond this weekend though). They're just about still at the sapling stage and are in leaf ok but those aren't full size yet, plus there's no blossom on any of them so I'm not expecting any fruit from them this year regardless. Whenever I transplant a tree, I'm pretty careful about excavating the roots without breaking them and having their new location already prepared, so the tree only spends a few minutes at most out of the soil. Helps to put a good shake of bone meal into the hole before setting the tree in and to give it a serious soaking as soon as the soil has been trodden in, to the point that the soil is nearly waterlogged. Worked out the other day that I've space for maybe four more fruit trees without them crowding one another, but I've plenty to work with in the meantime so that can wait until autumn/spring.
    I hope you talk to the tree before starting digging so it knows what's happening?

    Leave a comment:


  • mr chips
    replied
    Never heard of that one! I've used crushed eggshells around delicate seedlings & plants (e.g. pea vines, lettuce etc) as a barrier for slugs & snails, plus they're supposed to be a good addition to your compost - the shells, that is. I never put anything like cheese, meat rinds, fish skins etc into the compost as they're much more likely to attract rats and my compost bin is only about 20 metres from a brook, so I have to exercise caution. Was there any explanation offered as to the reason for the whole egg?

    About 5 years ago I started planting out 150 smallish saplings & whips in addition to the 150 or so I had already planted up to that point. A couple of years later, I realised I would have to either transplant around 70-80 of them or lose them to being crushed by diggers. Couldn't countenance them being destroyed, so I transplanted all the ones that were at risk. On & off I've had to transplant some other trees here & there due to ongoing projects or only having a temporary home for them (like those oaks I mentioned), so although I've planted maybe 350 trees around here, I've probably relocated nearly 100 of them and only lost maybe 10 in that process. Still, it means that I've some trees reaching 20-25 feet now and plenty of others at the 12-15 foot stage, instead of having had mostly bare ground up to now.

    I started tackling moving the damson trees today - they're getting to 10 feet now, so I can't really leave it another year. The job involves using the fork (not a spade, to avoid cutting through any roots) to prise the topsoil out in a circle around the tree that's as wide as the span of the branches, then gradually getting under the root ball to gradually prise it up out of the soil without breaking the roots. Not too easy when the ground is as dry & hard as it is right now. One down, two to go - I just had to come in from the heat and am mainly sitting here writing about it as an excuse not to go back out & start the next one!

    Leave a comment:


  • ustix
    replied
    Originally posted by mr chips View Post
    The mini-digger I was expecting at the start of last week didn't arrive, so as well as driving all the stakes for the boards two feet into clay with a sledgehammer (there may have been a pick axe involved a few times too) I ended up digging and barrowing about 3.5 tonnes of topsoil by hand in order to finish the first couple of raised beds (I also had to lift & re-lay part of a patio this week - ah well, have to work off all the extra home-drinking somehow ...) Anyway, they're sowed out with spuds and beetroot now, although I still have prepare somewhere for the other 20+ seed potatoes I have left. If each one I've sowed thus far produces another 8-10, then I'll have around 400 to harvest which will definitely take us beyond the new year. The broad beans we sowed about 3 weeks ago started to appear above the surface a few days back, as have the onions & shallots. Still no sign of any peas though - might sow out a few more if there's no change by the end of the week.

    I'm hugely relieved to see that the oak trees I transplanted a few weeks back are all putting out leaves now. Seeing as I'm that bit further north, I'm thinking I might be able to get away with transplanting a few damson trees this week (don't think I would risk it beyond this weekend though). They're just about still at the sapling stage and are in leaf ok but those aren't full size yet, plus there's no blossom on any of them so I'm not expecting any fruit from them this year regardless. Whenever I transplant a tree, I'm pretty careful about excavating the roots without breaking them and having their new location already prepared, so the tree only spends a few minutes at most out of the soil. Helps to put a good shake of bone meal into the hole before setting the tree in and to give it a serious soaking as soon as the soil has been trodden in, to the point that the soil is nearly waterlogged. Worked out the other day that I've space for maybe four more fruit trees without them crowding one another, but I've plenty to work with in the meantime so that can wait until autumn/spring.
    That's some amount of work. Fair play to you. Ever hear of placing an egg, shell intact, under a transplanted tree?
    Still not sure if the fella who told me that was winding me up, or not...

    Leave a comment:


  • mr chips
    replied
    The mini-digger I was expecting at the start of last week didn't arrive, so as well as driving all the stakes for the boards two feet into clay with a sledgehammer (there may have been a pick axe involved a few times too) I ended up digging and barrowing about 3.5 tonnes of topsoil by hand in order to finish the first couple of raised beds (I also had to lift & re-lay part of a patio this week - ah well, have to work off all the extra home-drinking somehow ...) Anyway, they're sowed out with spuds and beetroot now, although I still have prepare somewhere for the other 20+ seed potatoes I have left. If each one I've sowed thus far produces another 8-10, then I'll have around 400 to harvest which will definitely take us beyond the new year. The broad beans we sowed about 3 weeks ago started to appear above the surface a few days back, as have the onions & shallots. Still no sign of any peas though - might sow out a few more if there's no change by the end of the week.

    I'm hugely relieved to see that the oak trees I transplanted a few weeks back are all putting out leaves now. Seeing as I'm that bit further north, I'm thinking I might be able to get away with transplanting a few damson trees this week (don't think I would risk it beyond this weekend though). They're just about still at the sapling stage and are in leaf ok but those aren't full size yet, plus there's no blossom on any of them so I'm not expecting any fruit from them this year regardless. Whenever I transplant a tree, I'm pretty careful about excavating the roots without breaking them and having their new location already prepared, so the tree only spends a few minutes at most out of the soil. Helps to put a good shake of bone meal into the hole before setting the tree in and to give it a serious soaking as soon as the soil has been trodden in, to the point that the soil is nearly waterlogged. Worked out the other day that I've space for maybe four more fruit trees without them crowding one another, but I've plenty to work with in the meantime so that can wait until autumn/spring.

    Leave a comment:


  • the plastic paddy
    replied
    Originally posted by mr chips View Post
    Definitely use them!! Just keep track of which ones you planted where. Make sure to sow them in drills - so much easier to get them out of the ground that way.

    Just finished the second sowing of carrots, although the first sowing from a couple of weeks back hasn't even peeked above the surface yet as it's been so dry and I haven't been diligent enough about watering. After a sodden January and February, there's been no rain here at all since the middle of March. Also have peppers sown and am about to dig out the biggest pots I have for the tomatoes.

    All that sunshine has meant the amount of blossom on the fruit trees is incredible. The scent from the cherry blossom is just gorgeous, very rich - I'll have to think of how to deter birds from stealing them all this year as the trees are a bit too big to surround with netting. Might try hanging a few old CDs from them. I've a fake wasps' nest up nearby so hopefully that'll deter those feckers from stripping the fruit from the pips while it's still green, like they did last year. Even the birds didn't get to have a go!
    Think the bloody squirrels are going to be the issue in our garden. I have never lived anywhere with so many of the beggars. The kids made a very entertaining scarecrow to try and keep the pigeons off, whether it will work with the pox carriers we will see.

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  • mr chips
    replied
    Definitely use them!! Just keep track of which ones you planted where. Make sure to sow them in drills - so much easier to get them out of the ground that way.

    Just finished the second sowing of carrots, although the first sowing from a couple of weeks back hasn't even peeked above the surface yet as it's been so dry and I haven't been diligent enough about watering. After a sodden January and February, there's been no rain here at all since the middle of March. Also have peppers sown and am about to dig out the biggest pots I have for the tomatoes.

    All that sunshine has meant the amount of blossom on the fruit trees is incredible. The scent from the cherry blossom is just gorgeous, very rich - I'll have to think of how to deter birds from stealing them all this year as the trees are a bit too big to surround with netting. Might try hanging a few old CDs from them. I've a fake wasps' nest up nearby so hopefully that'll deter those feckers from stripping the fruit from the pips while it's still green, like they did last year. Even the birds didn't get to have a go!

    Leave a comment:


  • the plastic paddy
    replied
    Originally posted by mr chips View Post
    I wouldn't be the best one to advise you on that PP! When it comes to spuds, I very much go by what it says on the packet and I haven't grown them regularly enough to know what to do with different varieties. My own seed potatoes are supposed to arrive today, according to the delivery notification I just got. I'm not ready!! My oca arrived yesterday too, so the pressure's on to get the raised beds finished as quickly as possible - ideally all this would have been in a month ago, so every day counts now.
    This is the first year we have had a garden with space for a veg patch and it has an ancient greenhouse so we were always going to get growing this year. It is a nuisance that the garden centres are all shut as much for the expertise as anything else. I know what I like to use in the kitchen when it comes to spuds but we just couldn’t get any of the varieties we wanted on line. Ideally I would have preferred to just grow new potatoes as main crop is so cheap to buy direct from the farmer but Mrs PP ordered up the King Edwards and the MPs so I think I had better use them!?!?

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  • mr chips
    replied
    I wouldn't be the best one to advise you on that PP! When it comes to spuds, I very much go by what it says on the packet and I haven't grown them regularly enough to know what to do with different varieties. My own seed potatoes are supposed to arrive today, according to the delivery notification I just got. I'm not ready!! My oca arrived yesterday too, so the pressure's on to get the raised beds finished as quickly as possible - ideally all this would have been in a month ago, so every day counts now.

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  • the plastic paddy
    replied
    Originally posted by mr chips View Post
    Got more than two tons of topsoil dumped into that area for raised beds today. It's on a slope with limited access, so the link box on the back of the tractor had to be mostly emptied using a shovel. Spent a lot of the time doing so blinded with the sweat! Have to break up the sods & clods tomorrow, remove any stones and weed clumps, level it and add the fertiliser, then I'll sow out the first set of seedlings - beetroot first, then hopefully the seed potatoes I ordered will arrive before the end of next week. They'd better be feckin good spuds!!
    Our seed potatoes arrived yesterday after a six week delivery!!! New to this gardening business so expectations are low!!!! Managed to dog proof the veg patch anyway and put my first load of Charlottes in yesterday. Can’t be bothered with this chitting business as a potato farmer friend once told me it is a load of b’llocks. We will see...

    Could only get Charlotte, King Edwards and Maris Pipers. I was thinking of keeping the MPs for a main crop and using the King Edwards for second earlies, does that strike you as a stupid plan?

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  • acskerries
    replied
    Originally posted by mr chips View Post
    Got more than two tons of topsoil dumped into that area for raised beds today. It's on a slope with limited access, so the link box on the back of the tractor had to be mostly emptied using a shovel. Spent a lot of the time doing so blinded with the sweat! Have to break up the sods & clods tomorrow, remove any stones and weed clumps, level it and add the fertiliser, then I'll sow out the first set of seedlings - beetroot first, then hopefully the seed potatoes I ordered will arrive before the end of next week. They'd better be feckin good spuds!!
    you won't be missing the gym anyway, that all sounds like a damn hard workout

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