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    #76
    Originally posted by RED 49 View Post
    Watching a programme on sky the other night about Munster and Thomond Park , a local historian by the name of prionsias de prendergast was saying that the actual name of the ground should be pronounced Thumund Park from the Irish Tuadhmhumhain meaning north Munster.
    (Hence The Earl of Thomond, for whom Ireland should continue to be grateful).
    Gwan Joe!!

    Comment


      #77
      Words of the week... (And I am not even sure, that they will match in english...And to be honest, I am quite sure they won't...)

      Labyrinth: Meascán mearaí
      Quicksand: Gaineamh súraic
      Spider's web: Gréasán (m1; gs & npl -áin; gpl gréasán)
      Nightmare: Tromluí (m4; gs tromluí; pl. tromluithe)
      Cerebral and cognitive degeneration (What I feel and measure at the moment): Ar meathlú na cognaíochta agus na hinchinne
      Je vais me pendre!: Crochfaidh mé mé féin!

      It's said that the Devil hides in details... Are you sure that Paddy and his mates really did the cleaning up in Gaeilge? That's a really diabolic language. I'll need at least two lives before I'll begin to be able to use it a bit!
      The Scots (originally Irish, but by now Scotch) were at this time inhabiting Ireland, having driven the Irish (Picts) out of Scotland; while the Picts (originally Scots) were now Irish (living in brackets) and vice versa. It is essential to keep these distinctions clearly in mind (and verce visa).

      Comment


        #78
        Re "spider's web" - one of the terms for the internet is "idirghréasán", which literally means "interweb".
        Beir bua a chara, tá tú ag dul ó neart go neart!
        Tis but a scratch.

        Comment


          #79
          And mìreanna mearaí would make a jigsaw dax.
          Árd fhear!
          Gwan Joe!!

          Comment


            #80
            Bon, ce n'est pas tout ça... No rugby, no more Brexit, Corona virus won't get the Nobel Price of Peace because it is not able to rid the planet of Kim, Xi, Poutine, Trump, Bolsonaro, Assad, Horvath and other scourges for the Humanity, we only take the emergencies and pathologies in charge... So I will have enough time to bug you with my questions concerning Gaeilge...
            Let's begin with: Is there a difference of use between mo/do/a/ár/bhur/a and An... s'agam/s'agat/s'aige/s'aige/s'againn/s'agaibh/s'acu?Is my wife "mo bean chéile" or is she "an bean chéile s'agam"?
            The Scots (originally Irish, but by now Scotch) were at this time inhabiting Ireland, having driven the Irish (Picts) out of Scotland; while the Picts (originally Scots) were now Irish (living in brackets) and vice versa. It is essential to keep these distinctions clearly in mind (and verce visa).

            Comment


              #81
              She’s “mo bHean chéile”
              The early bird catches the worm but it's the second mouse that gets the cheese.

              Comment


                #82
                Originally posted by JN.Allezdax.com View Post
                Bon, ce n'est pas tout ça... No rugby, no more Brexit, Corona virus won't get the Nobel Price of Peace because it is not able to rid the planet of Kim, Xi, Poutine, Trump, Bolsonaro, Assad, Horvath and other scourges for the Humanity, we only take the emergencies and pathologies in charge... So I will have enough time to bug you with my questions concerning Gaeilge...
                Let's begin with: Is there a difference of use between mo/do/a/ár/bhur/a and An... s'agam/s'agat/s'aige/s'aige/s'againn/s'agaibh/s'acu?Is my wife "mo bean chéile" or is she "an bean chéile s'agam"?
                They're effectively two ways of saying the same thing. With the latter, you don't use the definite article "an". So if e.g. you were introducing her, you could say either -

                Seo mo bhean chéile.
                or
                Seo bean chéile s'agam.

                Both mean "this is my wife". Note that in the first example, the use of the possessive pronoun "mo" results in lenition of the subsequent word, i.e. "bean chéile" becomes "mo bhean chéile" as Arthur Guinness has pointed out.

                In relation to your commendable efforts at learning our language and in particular the redoubling of your efforts during this time of confinement, I would love to encourage you in your own language with the words "en marche!", but I fear this phrase's more recent usage would detract from the sentiment. That being the case, I'll just say beir bua agus bonne chance!
                Tis but a scratch.

                Comment


                  #83
                  Lockdowned mates, bonjour!
                  Here I am again, and I have some questions... Cuirreann ceisteanna amaideacha orm... (right?..)

                  - How would you say "Keep the faith"? I would have said "Clothaíge an creideamh", but I am by far not sure about the grammatical form and the right words... Anyway, Keep it despite all what happens and my questions...
                  -"The first day of the month"... I found "An chéad lá den mhí", "why not "An chéad lá na míosa"? Better using "of the" (den) than genitive form of "Mí"?
                  - I ask you humbly to forgive me and not to put the blame on me for spoiling your root language.... Ná cuir an locht ormSA...But what is this "ormsa" form and where does it come from? Is'nt "Ná cuir an locht orm" correct?
                  - And as I was by suffixes that are added to preposition or other words, isn't there any polite form in Gaeilge, excepted, like I found somewhere, that it's/was used when people talk to priests?.. I found only one form in Gáidhlig adding "se" to to sibh. Does such a form exist in Gaeilge or did the Brits let you forget all form of politeness in your verbal relationships?..

                  So, mates, like I awkwardly wrote, Clothaíge an creideamh, and most of all bígi sábháilte! Like a great friend of mine wrote to me: Smaoiním oraibh go minic...
                  The Scots (originally Irish, but by now Scotch) were at this time inhabiting Ireland, having driven the Irish (Picts) out of Scotland; while the Picts (originally Scots) were now Irish (living in brackets) and vice versa. It is essential to keep these distinctions clearly in mind (and verce visa).

                  Comment


                    #84
                    I'm not aware of a specific phrase or saying for "keep the faith", but translating proverbs or sayings like this isn't always possible anyway. My best suggestion is "coinnigh do mhisneach", which would be literally translated as "keep your courage".

                    In Irish, you wouldn't have two definite articles in a clause where there's a use of the genitive case - in your example, an chéad lá na míosa. You could however say "seo céad lá na míosa" for "this is the first day of the month". But to say "I came home on the first day of the month, you would use "tháinig mé abhaile ar an chéad lá den mhí" or "tháinig mé abhaile ar chéad lá na míosa".

                    "Ormsa", or other words with the suffix -sa, is a form of emphasis, similar to "moi-meme" in French but more widely used in Irish. For example, if you're having an argument and want to say "it's not my fault!", you'll say "níl an locht ormsa!".
                    There is a key difference in the way this suffix is used for emphasis in Irish rather than English. Let's use a simple statement of fact.
                    "That's my beer."
                    "Sin mo bheoir."
                    So far, so good. But in these lockdown times, imagine you are disputing the ownership of the last bottle of beer in the house. In English you'll emphasise the word "my" - "That's MY beer!" In Irish, some people might mistakenly say "Sin mo bheoir!", which is really an English-speaker's mindset. The more authentic way to say this in Irish is "Sin mo bheorsa!", then beat the usurper about the face severely to leave them in no doubt as to the ownership of said beverage, and stand over them as you drink it. That'll learn 'em.

                    There used to be a way of addressing priests in the plural, similar to using "vous" instead of "tu" in French, so a priest would have been greeted with "Dia daoibh" rather than "Dia duit". However this is obsolete now - and in any case, we don't want them getting notions again.

                    Go dté tú slán, a chara.
                    Tis but a scratch.

                    Comment


                      #85
                      Originally posted by mr chips View Post
                      I'm not aware of a specific phrase or saying for "keep the faith", but translating proverbs or sayings like this isn't always possible anyway. My best suggestion is "coinnigh do mhisneach", which would be literally translated as "keep your courage".

                      In Irish, you wouldn't have two definite articles in a clause where there's a use of the genitive case - in your example, an chéad lá na míosa. You could however say "seo céad lá na míosa" for "this is the first day of the month". But to say "I came home on the first day of the month, you would use "tháinig mé abhaile ar an chéad lá den mhí" or "tháinig mé abhaile ar chéad lá na míosa".

                      "Ormsa", or other words with the suffix -sa, is a form of emphasis, similar to "moi-meme" in French but more widely used in Irish. For example, if you're having an argument and want to say "it's not my fault!", you'll say "níl an locht ormsa!".
                      There is a key difference in the way this suffix is used for emphasis in Irish rather than English. Let's use a simple statement of fact.
                      "That's my beer."
                      "Sin mo bheoir."
                      So far, so good. But in these lockdown times, imagine you are disputing the ownership of the last bottle of beer in the house. In English you'll emphasise the word "my" - "That's MY beer!" In Irish, some people might mistakenly say "Sin mo bheoir!", which is really an English-speaker's mindset. The more authentic way to say this in Irish is "Sin mo bheorsa!", then beat the usurper about the face severely to leave them in no doubt as to the ownership of said beverage, and stand over them as you drink it. That'll learn 'em.

                      There used to be a way of addressing priests in the plural, similar to using "vous" instead of "tu" in French, so a priest would have been greeted with "Dia daoibh" rather than "Dia duit". However this is obsolete now - and in any case, we don't want them getting notions again.

                      Go dté tú slán, a chara.
                      I hope JNaD doesn't notice that pejorative accusation of having an English mindset.
                      Stand up for the Ulcer men

                      Comment


                        #86
                        I don't, Tippey, I don't. But in that case, english and french have the same expression with a louder "my". And I am not even sure we are louder than our best enemies.
                        The Scots (originally Irish, but by now Scotch) were at this time inhabiting Ireland, having driven the Irish (Picts) out of Scotland; while the Picts (originally Scots) were now Irish (living in brackets) and vice versa. It is essential to keep these distinctions clearly in mind (and verce visa).

                        Comment


                          #87
                          Árd fhear dax (Whether you do be tall or small!)
                          Gwan Joe!!

                          Comment


                            #88
                            Tataaaa! Here I am again. Despite a huge lack of time because of my professional activity, I try to keep some moments for Martian... sorry, Gaeilge.

                            Two grammatical enigmas for me today.

                            - "He seems to be indifferent"... Would have said "Tá an chuma air tá sé (or "go raibh sé"?) réchúiseach"... right? Or to simple and french/english/german formed?

                            - "I am not tenacious enough"... I would have use "go leor" for "enough"... But before, or after righin? "Nílim righin go leor", or "nílim go leor righin"?... Or again french formed, far for irish idioms?

                            Nílim thar an mbarra go fóill...
                            The Scots (originally Irish, but by now Scotch) were at this time inhabiting Ireland, having driven the Irish (Picts) out of Scotland; while the Picts (originally Scots) were now Irish (living in brackets) and vice versa. It is essential to keep these distinctions clearly in mind (and verce visa).

                            Comment


                              #89
                              You can say "Tá an chuma air ..." but you can also just say "Tá cuma air ..." - the closest translation for either one is "he has the appearance of ..." (NB the preposition is key to the meaning here - I will return to this!)
                              You follow this with go bhfuil / go raibh / go mbeidh / go mbeadh / go mbíodh depending on your tense (that he is / was / will be / would be / used to be).
                              So the simplest/most elegant form of words for your first sentence would be "Tá cuma air go bhfuil sé réchúiseach".

                              Now some Martian for you ... That word "réchúiseach" can mean indifferent, but is more frequently used to indicate that the person is relaxed, laid-back etc. If you want to indicate that you don't care about something, you usually say "Is cuma liom" - ca m'est égal. The preposition changes the meaning entirely when used together with the word "cuma".
                              So - "he appears to be indifferent" could be expressed as "Tá cuma air gur cuma leis".

                              "Go leor" precedes the noun, but follows the adjective (as in English):
                              "Tá go leor dinnéir ar mo phláta" - there's enough dinner on my plate.
                              "Tá mo dhinnéar te go leor" - my dinner is hot enough.
                              (NB - here's some more Martian for you. "Go leor" is a compound preposition. All compound prepositions render the noun which follows them into the genitive case, which is why I had to spell the word for dinner with two different endings above.)
                              So your second sentence would be either "Nílim righin go leor" or "Níl mé righin go leor". This is grammatically correct, but clearly not factually correct!
                              Tis but a scratch.

                              Comment


                                #90
                                "This is grammatically correct, but clearly not factually correct!"

                                And here is the point. Grammar is already not as simple as that, but behind the grammatical curtain, there is the way irish is spoken, considering the sounds, the music/rythms, the idioms and most of all the philosophy/logic of the language (not only the refusal of haviing, of being, but the strange feeling irish people do not decide what is, what happens, but are in the middle of multiple things that happen to them, on them, at them etc etc).. It looks soooo complicated to say simple things.
                                The Scots (originally Irish, but by now Scotch) were at this time inhabiting Ireland, having driven the Irish (Picts) out of Scotland; while the Picts (originally Scots) were now Irish (living in brackets) and vice versa. It is essential to keep these distinctions clearly in mind (and verce visa).

                                Comment

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