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  • snakey
    replied


    offically irish is our 1st language and english our 2nd. its a pity that so many people dismiss it as a waste of time etc. i remember being in north wales a couple of years ago and walking through a town centre while the local secondary school were on lunch break and everyone of them were speaking welsh to each other by choice. i'd love to see this happen in ireland but sadly due to the way its taught and peoples attitudes to the language i cant see it happening.


    its also a very handything to have while abroad, kinda like a secret language. you can get caught out bad though if you dont know who's around you!!!![img]smileys/lol.gif[/img][img]smileys/lol.gif[/img][img]smileys/lol.gif[/img]

    Leave a comment:


  • markcaver
    replied
    My Irish is pretty piss poor although I do try and go raibh maith agat etc. every day to shop keepers and the like..

    But a French girl I know wanted to do Irish as her second foreign language for her TEFL course and she could find nowhere in Cork to do it in the evenings after work. She ended up doing Japanese FFS

    That is ridiculous IMHO

    Leave a comment:


  • lahinch_lass
    replied


    I dropped down to pass irish at inter-cert stage. I had a pretty good understanding of the language but didn't have any ability to write it at all. I have the same trouble with French.


    Tammy's point about english grammar not being taught properly is a very good one. When people don't learn the grammar for their primary language it's very difficult to relate to grammar rules for a 2nd or 3rd language in turn.


    The real fun my brother & I had at school was the fact our Dad never spoke a word of irish, while our mother is from Donegal so hers was all ulster irish - vastly different to the Munster irish we had to do in school. Talk about confusion when she tried helping us with homework !


    When I got the 4 dialects in leaving cert the only way I could wrap my head around the ulster irish content was to think in a Donegal accent - NOT one other person in the pass class was able to cope with it. There was a huge amount of snobbery among the gaelgoirs from each dialect. Aran islanders would turn up their noses at munster or ulster irish speakers, even TG4 turned down someone based on their irish dialect when they wanted an irish speaker for an interview at an event I was working at. That was 12 yrs ago, i think some of that attitude has changed but it drove me up the walls.


    I'd love to be able to speak irish to other irish people - a language others don't speak. think about how we feel when in France/germany/italy/spain and listening to them babbling away in their native language. Most of them understand english, but having the option to have a side discussion in irish can come in handy at times.. if it were possible [img]smileys/wink.gif[/img]

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  • An Fear Bolg
    replied
    Originally posted by Old Dog
    Originally posted by Point
    Originally posted by Eamo


    Why are the vast majority of posts based on the
    assumption that learning Irish in school is a good thing?It's
    a complete and utter waste of time and resources.Why not
    learn Cherokee or some obscure dialect from Northern
    China (scratch that it might actually be useful ).By all
    means teach the kids Irish but teach it to them in your own
    time-not in taxpayer-funded time that's supposed to
    prepare them for being citizens of a globalised world.


     I don't care how it's taught- whether by frontal lobe
    implants or pavlovian methods- it's still a waste of
    time,energy and taxpayers money.


     Make the dammed thing optional.The Irish (of
    all nationalities) should know that the future is external not
    internal.We should be looking beyond this tiny island with
    parochial history for our future.Let's turn our kid's minds
    outward and give them a chance at a future in the World
    rather than wasting 20 per cent of their educational lives
    studying a language that is at best a footnote in terms of
    global education.


    Compulsory in Primary School and optional thereafter
    would be acceptable to me, but the student must take up
    another language.


    Ditto - or keep it compulsory as far as Junior Cert after
    which a kid might have a better insight into his/her
    aptitude for the lingo and their attitude towards it.
    The language and all the attendant culture would be in
    severe trouble if it was left up to 13-14 year olds to decide
    whether to keep it on or not. I would prefer to not take the
    decision out of their hands, but at that age can anyone say
    they were making decisions for the right reasons?

    I certainly wasn't when I took history for the leaving cert
    because the girl with the big knockers was doing it, for
    example. [img]smileys/lol.gif[/img]

    Leave a comment:


  • 99_oK?
    replied


    Dean dearmaid ar Peig, and léigh an dán seo... http://poetry.poetryx.com/poems/11195/


    Tá ceoil sna focail sin (& rudaí eile do daoine....)


    Some of those scribbles by the Feakle maths teacher chould have been studied a bit more by Bishop Magee and his supporters......


    Slán...... [img]smileys/wink.gif[/img]


    Leave a comment:


  • SIMBA
    replied


    I've always been a fan of the Irish language and even did my leaving Cert through it, but since then I hadlet it lapse.


    However whenthe Gaeliban descended on us last October <Chips and the Missus>I found myself getting slightly envious listening to them speak so effortlessly in Irish and decided to start using it more myself and not just when I'm drunk either.


    Most people understand a few words even if they never took to it in school and will attempt touse them in reply, if you initiate a conversation in Irish, so it's far from dead and it would be nice to see a revival.





    Leave a comment:


  • 99_oK?
    replied


    Dean dearmaid ar Peig, and léigh an dán seo... http://poetry.poetryx.com/poems/11195/


    Tá ceoil sna focail sin (& rudaí eile do daoine....)


    Some of those scribbles by the Feakle maths teacher chould have been studied a bit more by Bishop Magee and his supporters......


    Slán...... [img]smileys/wink.gif[/img]


    Leave a comment:


  • Mack the Knife
    replied
    Originally posted by Deedsie

    www.teg.ie is the website of the <SPAN =er_sub>Teastas Eorpach na Gaeilge </SPAN>


    <SPAN =er_sub>The European Certificate in Irish.</SPAN>


    <SPAN =er_sub>Most of the Irish classes are done through this certificate. </SPAN>


    <SPAN =er_sub>All the class notes and exams are available on the site. </SPAN>


    <SPAN =er_sub></SPAN> 
    Perhaps if you gave up going to evening classes to learn bogoir you could afford the fare to Edinburgh.
    Take up something useful instead like Feng Shui.
    Paul O'Connell is a national treasure , Peig was just a conceited bitter old hag.

    Leave a comment:


  • Old Dog
    replied
    Originally posted by Point
    Originally posted by Eamo


    Why are the vast majority of posts based on the assumption that learning Irish in school is a good thing?It's a complete and utter waste of time and resources.Why not learn Cherokee or some obscure dialect from Northern China (scratch that it might actually be useful ).By all means teach the kids Irish but teach it to them in your own time-not in taxpayer-funded time that's supposed to prepare them for being citizens of a globalised world.


    I don't care how it's taught- whether by frontal lobe implants or pavlovian methods- it's still a waste of time,energy and taxpayers money.


    Make the dammed thing optional.The Irish (of all nationalities) should know that the future is external not internal.We should be looking beyond this tiny island with parochial history for our future.Let's turn our kid's minds outward and give them a chance at a future in the World rather than wasting 20 per cent of their educational lives studying a language that is at best a footnote in terms of global education.


    Compulsory in Primary School and optional thereafter would be acceptable to me, but the student must take up another language.


    Ditto - or keep itcompulsory as far as Junior Cert after whicha kid might have a better insight into his/her aptitude for the lingo and their attitudetowards it.














    Leave a comment:


  • Point
    replied
    Originally posted by Eamo


    Why are the vast majority of posts based on the assumption that learning Irish in school is a good thing?It's a complete and utter waste of time and resources.Why not learn Cherokee or some obscure dialect from Northern China (scratch that it might actually be useful ).By all means teach the kids Irish but teach it to them in your own time-not in taxpayer-funded time that's supposed to prepare them for being citizens of a globalised world.


    I don't care how it's taught- whether by frontal lobe implants or pavlovian methods- it's still a waste of time,energy and taxpayers money.


    Make the dammed thing optional.The Irish (of all nationalities) should know that the future is external not internal.We should be looking beyond this tiny island with parochial history for our future.Let's turn our kid's minds outward and give them a chance at a future in the World rather than wasting 20 per cent of their educational lives studying a language that is at best a footnote in terms of global education.


    Compulsory in Primary School and optional thereafter would be acceptable to me, but the student must take up another language.

    Leave a comment:


  • Eamo
    replied


    Why are the vast majority of posts based on the assumption that learning Irish in school is a good thing?It's a complete and utter waste of time and resources.Why not learn Cherokee or some obscure dialect from Northern China (scratch that it might actually be useful ).By all means teach the kids Irish but teach it to them in your own time-not in taxpayer-funded time that's supposed to prepare them for being citizens of a globalised world.


    I don't care how it's taught- whether by frontal lobe implants or pavlovian methods- it's still a waste of time,energy and taxpayers money.


    Make the dammed thing optional.The Irish (of all nationalities) should know that the future is external not internal.We should be looking beyond this tiny island with parochial history for our future.Let's turn our kid's minds outward and give them a chance at a future in the World rather than wasting 20 per cent of their educational lives studying a language that is at best a footnote in terms of global education.

    Leave a comment:


  • mr chips
    replied

    www.focal.ie is a terminology database - not quite a dictionary, but a pretty extensive resource of specialised and not-so-specialised vocabulary. Lots of technical, legal, administrative terms.

    As a fluent speaker who returned to the language relatively late in life, I absolutely, totally and completely agree with all the criticism of how it was taught in school. Bloody Peig. I might well have appreciated that book if I'd been in the second year of an Irish degree, but at age 15 and without even the compensation of TG4 weather girls to, ahem, awaken my interest,[img]smileys/wink.gif[/img] it was completely counterproductive to have this book on the curriculum (saying that, the same applies to having to drudge through Pride and Prejudice for my Inter Cert - put me off period dramas for life).

    Thankfully I got over the damage done by Peig and An Roinn Oideachais - then again, I've grown up and gotten over the dislike I had for pretty much all of my academic subjects in school. It's something that really matters to me now, and I changed careers about three years ago to work in the sector. Nowadays I spend more than half my life communicating in the language, both verbally and in writing.

    To those who are interested in introducing the language into their lives, I say definitely go for it - sometimes it'll be easy, sometimes it won't, but you won't regret it and it's a brilliant feeling each time you realise you've gotten a stage further on. Just make sure it's fun! One barrier I found really hard to overcome was making the transition to using it at home - having had a fluent speaker as my significant other for some 17 years, I had never really taken much interest and it was only in the last three or four that I decided I wanted to try and use it as a first language at home. Being completely accustomed to speaking English with each other, it was a very stilted process at first, and it was always too easy to slip back into English. In contrast, I have friends with whom I have only ever spoken Irish, and in mixed company (i.e. non-Irish speakers) it is very odd to converse with them in English. It's just part of the learning process.

    By the way, if any parents of young children would like to bring their kids up with some knowledge of the language but feel they don't have much/enough fluency themselves, you can send me a PM if you want - the organisation I work for developed a support package specifically geared to people in your situation. It was put together mainly for parents of kids who go to a Gaelscoil, but doesn't need to be limited to that.

    Leave a comment:


  • Deedsie
    replied


    www.teg.ie is thewebsite of the Teastas Eorpach na Gaeilge


    The European Certificate in Irish.


    Most of the Irish classes are done through this certificate.


    All the class notes and exams are available on the site.


    Leave a comment:


  • Arthur Guinness
    replied
    Originally posted by An Fear Bolg
    Originally posted by taz
    Originally posted by Deedsie


    That ladies lineage post on this site regularly.

    I hate Hitler too but I hope I didn't offend anyones lineage here with that.

    If you are 16 or 17 the last thing that would inspire the learning of the Irish language was that book.
    I actually remember In my school, someone ending up in the principals office because of a "Peig" class. We all took it in turns to read part of the book,it got to the guy in question to read a piece ,but he could'nt. He was asleep snoring on the table.

    Ah "Peig" the memories.
    I genuinely think people find Peig a handy excuse to give up on Irish. The way it was/is taught is shocking really, unless the pupils have a very strong grounding in irish they're going to struggle and end up losing out.

    The curriculum is changing though, for example by 2012 40% of the marks in junior and leaving will be for spoken exams, so more emphasis will be put on conversational Irish. Thank christ!

    The greatest enemy of the Irish language is the Dept of Education. I was shocked when I saw the crap one of my daughters was made to learn,different accents,ancient Irish etc. Glad to see there's going to be a change. I would like to see Irish coming into more common usage. It really is the last badge of our identity.

    Leave a comment:


  • manofmunster
    replied
    Originally posted by Deedsie


    That ladies lineage post on this site regularly.


    I think once they change the way its done in school to actually encourage kids to speak the language instead of just writing and memorising it we'll all be in a better position to have a bilingual society.


    Its not the money put into Irish that bothers me, its the way the money is wasted on trying to teach kids a language without actually speaking it.





    Agreed - good post

    Leave a comment:

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