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Seachtain na Gaeilge

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  • JN.Allezdax.com
    replied
    Thinking you improve in Irish is like climbing on a chair and believing you are closer to the moon... And then you always find an exception that saws a leg and you find yourself with your nose on the ground of the (hard) reality!

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  • Arthur Guinness
    replied
    Originally posted by RED 49 View Post
    Watching a programme on sky the other night about Munster and Thomond Park , a local historian by the name of prionsias de prendergast was saying that the actual name of the ground should be pronounced Thumund Park from the Irish Tuadhmhumhain meaning north Munster.
    That’s how some Limerick people always pronounce it. Not many but some.

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  • RED 49
    replied
    Watching a programme on sky the other night about Munster and Thomond Park , a local historian by the name of prionsias de prendergast was saying that the actual name of the ground should be pronounced Thumund Park from the Irish Tuadhmhumhain meaning north Munster.

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  • ustix
    replied
    Árd fhear dax!
    Lean ort 's go néirí go gheal leat...

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  • JN.Allezdax.com
    replied
    I was sure you would be a great help to me! And for what concerns senility or drunkeness, that's what I suspected... Even if senility was coming a bit soon.

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  • mr chips
    replied
    1 - The word "inghlactha" is a past participle with a prefix, not an adjective, so it doesn't have to agree with the gender of the noun "aontú".

    2 - The word "ann" can mean either "in him" or "in it". So "lá deas atá ann" means "it's a nice day" - the closest literal equivalent in English would be "a nice day is in it".

    3 - "Tá siabhrán orm" means "I am deluded/confused". This can be used in the context of either senility or drunkenness - I could not possibly offer an opinion as to which meaning applies to you, especially after your eight abstemious weeks ...

    4 - Hoo, boy. This can be done to provide emphasis, but not always. Both versions can be correct, depending on context. But there are many, many answers to this question!!
    Instead of me trying to do that here, I suggest that - at your own risk! - you look up http://nualeargais.ie/gnag/gram.htm and do a search for the section entitled "The Copula (an Chopail)", in particular the subsections "the copula in the identification clause", "syntax of the copula -> the identification clause" and "deviations from the PSO-rule in the copular clause". It's all pretty dense, and I can see there are a couple of minor inaccuracies which I can clarify for you if you want me to, but overall there are some useful examples of usage which I hope will help to clarify things for you.

    And before you start - make sure you have no sharp objects or firearms close to hand, in case you are tempted to use them on yourself before you finish ...!

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  • JN.Allezdax.com
    replied
    Fin des vacances... End of the break I have made since July. My brain needed to cool down. And before to go back to the thing, I decided a 8 weeks without alcohol challenge (I need all my last neurons! )

    I have some questions if you can...
    - "Inné dúirt an Taoiseach: Níl Aontú inghlactha". Surely grammatically incorrect, french "gealique de cuisine"... Question: What about gender agreement? Aointú, masc... Inghlactha, ? I suspect you would use gerund, but how works negatif gerund?
    - "Tá urra mór ann"... I found "HE is very strong"... Why "he", and not "she", or "you" or "they"? Is it only a matter of context?
    - "Tá siabhrán orm"... Mentally correct, I have suspected it for a long long time, moreover, with the age, it gets even worse, Last evidence: What I am trying to do nowadays, especially in this post!
    - And last but not the least: "Is é mo/do sheal é", it's my/your turn. Ok, "mo", "do" "a" (sing.) lenite, when "ár", "bhu"r and "a" (plur.) eclipse... BUt what does the second "é", at the end of the phrase? Why can't I simply write/say "Is é mo/do sheal"?

    Thx for the help, I think I have not finished bugging you... Excepted if they put my in a strange house with small coloured pills and a jacket wth sleeves that are bound in the back.

    PS: Surely will a lot of you think "WTF does he try to learn/undersatnd irish, when he it would be better if he wouldn't spoil english?!.." But I make do with very little, and so long I can follow a rugby game and the "Game of Brexit" series correctly it's enough to me. Gaeilge is by far something really, really different and challenging for my pooor old brain.

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  • JN.Allezdax.com
    replied
    A few months ago, I decided to take a look at how Gaeilge works... Was for me a good worship for my neurones, better than crossword puzzles or sudoku, and anyway more interresting...
    A thiarcais! Maybe the hardest thing I have learnt for decades... And instead of using my neurones, I have the feeling I lose them faster. Ok, french preople are not exactly known for their habilities in foreign languages, my english is crap, my german so lala, but in that case...
    I use a book with cds a perfid friend of mine gave me for Christmas ( :_wave__rvmp_by_bad_ ) and the teanglann.ie site I find fantastic and very usefull. I began with duolingo. But that's terrible. Every time I think I understand something (grammar rule, word, expression, declension or something else) a further research shows me something else and I have the feeling to make a step backwards. I watch oft music and sport programmes on TG4... I can't follow the logic, the rythm and the music of what is said. And I do not even write about how you all in the different regions pronounce the words... :_raincloud__rvmp_by I tried to dissect the presentation of the QFs on the Pro14 site, I did not even found the verb in the first sentence!
    Anyway, since I had to study thermodynamic in my youth, and you can trust me, I pitifully failed I never found such a thing like Gaeilge. Some say we have to suffer to reach our goals, no pain, no gain... . Ní thaightear saill gan saothrú... Gaeilge is for me some intellectual Everest, and trying to climb it really hurts me, my pride and my self-esteem! :):):)

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  • 99_oK?
    replied


    Fair play to you An Tusual prati scealloga.....


    Or Mr Tayto to ... [img]smileys/wink.gif[/img]


    Still remember the smell/tasete of Murphy's burnt spuds...


    (will never forget the day a box of 'em sparked a full-scale anti-terrorist response at Fiumicino.... [img]smileys/redface.gif[/img] )


    (maybe I spent too long outside these fair shores...)

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  • mr chips
    replied
    Just got home from running an event in Ballycastle to launch a report into local community attitudes to the Irish language. Considering the historic misconceptions about the language here in Ian Paisley's constituency ("Irish language = republican"), I have to admit to a sense of satisfaction that we got the Ulster Unionist mayor to do the formal launch, and one of the guests was the local PSNI inspector, who is now enquiring about language training for some of his officers.

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  • Hopelessly Devoted
    replied


    Originally posted by mr chips
    On your chips? Weirdo.[img]smileys/razz.gif[/img]

    On my Taytos! Referring to an earlier title bestowed on you.


    On my chips: anrud céanna. [img]smileys/wink.gif[/img]

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  • mr chips
    replied
    On your chips? Weirdo.[img]smileys/razz.gif[/img]

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  • Hopelessly Devoted
    replied


    Originally posted by mr chips
    Go raibh maith agaibh! Salainn agus fíon ghéar le do thoil ...

    cáisagus oinniúnníos fearr...

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  • mr chips
    replied
    Go raibh maith agaibh! Salainn agus fíon ghéar le do thoil ...

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  • Mack the Knife
    replied
    An Tusual prati scealloga !

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