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    #46
    Originally posted by kermit
    Originally posted by Hopelessly Devoted
    There are loads of Israeli goods in our shops, mainly fruit and vegetables. Tesco last week only had Israeli red peppers, most of their herbs are Israeli as are many of their organic potatoes. Debenhams has ex Israeli soldiers selling Dead Sea products. Bar codes for Israeli products is: 729


    More info here: www.ipsc.ie and here: http://www.bdsmovement.net/


    Do Palestinian goods have a Bar Code number?


    Do they have any?

    Comment


      #47

      Originally posted by Humpty Dumpty

      Terrorists are including Israel, hamas, usa, ira, bin laden, etc, but we should not show support for one over the other
      Hamas is a militant Islamic organisation which was recently forced into power by Israeli actions in the Gaza Strip which pushed the people away from Fatah and towards extremism, the only way you could possibly show support for them is by wearing their t-shirt and giving them money.

      Israel is a state, people aren't boycotting Likud or Labour. A purchase of goods manufactured in Israel is funding the purchase of heavily subsidised military hardware used to bomb civilians. It would also show support for the blocking of rivers for irrigation, denying people access to clean water further upstream and forcing people off their land for use in agricultural development.

      In boycotting Israeli products I'm in no way showing my support for Hamas, but rather for the people of Gaza and the West Bank.
      "It’s not the team you support, it’s the club you should support. The team on the pitch will ebb and flow because that’s the nature of sport. No team has ever been successful decade on decade. The club has the history and that’s the passion you should have."

      Comment


        #48
        I never knowingly buy anything Israeli.Wishthe labelling was better so I couldbe confidentI never do so accidentally
        My computer thinks I'm gay
        What's the difference anyway
        When all the people do all day
        Is stare into a phone

        Comment


          #49


          Most Palestinian food that hasn't rotted while farmers are kept from their land doesn't get out Kermit.
          <H1 =article-no-standfirst id=ing-al&#111;ne>To be in Gaza is to be trapped</H1>
          <UL ="article-attributes no-pic">
          <UL>
          <LI =byline>Peter Beaumont, foreign affairs editor </LI>
          <LI =publicati&#111;n>guardian.co.uk, Sunday 28 December 2008 00.05 GMT </LI>[/list][/list]
          <DIV id=article-wrapper>


          Gaza. Always the suffering of Gaza, most potent symbol of the tragedy of Palestine. In 1948, during the Nakba – or "The Catastrophe" as Palestinians describe the war that gave birth to the state of Israel – 200,000 refugees poured into Gaza, swelling its population by more than two-thirds. Then Gaza fell under Egyptian control.


          The six day war of 1967 saw more refugees, but with it came the occupation of Gaza by Israel – an occupation that, despite Israel's declaration under Prime Minister Ariel Sharon that it would unilaterally withdraw its settlements and troops in 2005, has never really ended.


          It has not ended, for to be in Gaza is to be trapped. Without future or hope, limited to a few square miles. Its borders, land and sea, are defined largely by Israel (with Egypt's compliance along the southern end of the Strip).


          It is not open to the ocean apart from a narrow outlet accessible only to the fishing fleet, a coastal blockade policed by Israel's gunboats, the boundaries of which have only recently been tested by boats of protesters sailing from Cyprus to draw attention to conditions inside Gaza.


          Once it was possible for Gazans to pass with relative ease in and out of the Strip to work in Israel. In recent years, the noose around the 1.5 million people living there has been tightening incrementally, until a whole population – in the most densely settled urban area upon the planet – has been locked in behind walls and fences.


          Since Israeli troops overran the Strip in 1967, Israeli politicians and generals have always seen it as a problem – a hotbed of radicalism and opposition. And so Israel has ventured failed experiment after experiment in the attempt to control Gaza. It has tried everything except the obvious – to allow its people to be free.


          It has tried directly managing Gaza, and a brutal policy of quarantine backed by tanks, jets and gunboats. It has attempted the maintenance of strategic settlements, which only provided a focus for resistance against the patrolling troops. And when that failed, Israel retreated – only to find that, without a proximate enemy, those living inside turned to attacking the nearby towns with crude missiles.


          Ironically, one of Israel's experiments involved assisting in the creation of Hamas, which had its roots in Egypt's Muslim Brotherhood, to counter the power of Yasser Arafat's Palestine Liberation Organisation. Israel has been determined to push Hamas ever closer to all-out war since insisting that even though it won free and fair Palestinian legislative elections in 2006, its right to govern could not be treated as legitimate.


          Since Hamas took power in Gaza in summer 2007, after a short, brutal struggle with Fatah, Israel's policy has been one of collective punishment, summed up in the policy of "no prosperity, no development, no humanitarian crisis". Not a visible humanitarian crisis, at least.


          For what has been going on inside Gaza since the economic blockade began a year and a half ago has cynically stretched the definition of what constitutes the boundaries of such a crisis.


          Those seeking urgent medical care outside Gaza's walls are forced to go through a long and humiliating process. Even some of those who are allowed to leave, human rights group
          Free Palestine.

          Champions aren\'t made in the gyms. Champions are made from something they have deep inside them - a desire, a dream, a vision.
          Muhammad Ali

          Comment


            #50
            <H1>Robert Fisk’s World: How can anyone believe there is 'progress' in the Middle East?</H1>[/i]



            <!-proximic_c&#111;ntent_&#111;n->A test of Obama’s gumption will come scarcely three months after his inauguration<!-proximic_c&#111;ntent_off->
            Saturday, 27 December 2008
            If reporting is, as I suspect, a record of mankind's folly, then the end of 2008 is proving my point. <!-proximic_c&#111;ntent_off->


            <!-proximic_c&#111;ntent_&#111;n->


            Let's kick off with the man who is not going to change the Middle East, Barack Obama, who last week, with infinite predictability, became Time's "person of the year". But buried in a long and immensely tedious interview inside the magazine, Obama devotes just one sentence to the Arab-Israeli conflict: "And seeing if we can build on some of the progress, at least in conversation, that's been made around the Israeli-Palestinian conflict will be a priority."


            What is this man talking about? "Building on progress?" What progress? On the verge of another civil war between Hamas and the Palestinian Authority, with Benjamin Netanyahu a contender for Israeli prime minister, with Israel's monstrous wall and its Jewish colonies still taking more Arab land, and Palestinians still firing rockets at Sderot, and Obama thinks there's "progress" to build on?


            I suspect this nonsensical language comes from the mental mists of his future Secretary of State. "At least in conversation" is pure Hillary Clinton – its meaning totally eludes me – and the giveaway phrase about progress being made "around" the Israeli-Palestinian conflict is even weirder. Of course if Obama had talked about an end to Jewish settlement building on Arab land – the only actual "building" that is going on in the conflict – relations with Hamas as well as the Palestinian Authority, justice for both sides in the conflict, along with security for Palestinians as well as Israelis, then he might actually effect a little change.


            An interesting test of Obama's gumption is going to come scarcely three months after his inauguration when he will have a little promise to honour. Yup, it's that dratted 24 April commemoration of the Armenian genocide when Armenians remember the 1.5 million of their countrymen – citizens of the Ottoman empire slaughtered by the Turks – on the anniversary of the day in 1915 when the first Armenian professors, artists and others were taken off to execution by the Ottoman authorities.


            Bill Clinton promised Armenians he'd call it a "genocide" if they helped to elect him to office. George Bush did the same. So did Obama. The first two broke their word and resorted to "tragedy" rather than "genocide" once they'd got the votes, because they were frightened of all those bellowing Turkish generals, not to mention – in Bush's case – the US military supply routes through Turkey, the "roads and so on" as Robert Gates called them in one of history's more gripping ironies, these being the same "roads and so on" upon which the Armenians were sent on their death marches in 1915. And Mr Gates will be there to remind Obama of this. So I bet you – I absolutely bet on the family cat – that Obama is going to find that "genocide" is "tragedy" by 24 April.


            By chance, I browsed through Turkish Airlines' in-flight magazine while cruising into Istanbul earlier this month and found an article on the historical Turkish region of Harput. "Asia's natural garden", "a popular holiday resort", the article calls Harput, "where churches dedicated to the Virgin Mary rise next to tombs of the ancestors of Mehmet the Conqueror".


            Odd, all those churches, isn't it? And you have to shake your head to remember that Harput was the centre of the Christian Armenian genocide, the city from which Leslie Davis, the brave American consul in Harput, sent back his devastating eyewitness dispatches of the thousands of butchered Armenian men and women whose corpses he saw with his own eyes. But I guess that all would spoil the "natu
            If a man tried to take his time on earth and prove before he died what one man's life could be worth, I wonder what would happen to this world

            Comment


              #51
              An IDF spokeswomen on Sky said that as far as Isreal was
              concerned there was no humanitarian crisis in Gaza...
              The trick is getting to the second set of horses.

              Comment


                #52
                Is it true Egypt is accusing Hamas of denying victims of the attack
                medical treatment?
                Shameless self promotion time ladies and gents!
                Munster: Early Season
                Munster: Escape from Pool of Death
                Munster: HEC Champions 2007/2008
                Munster: Full Season Highlights.

                Comment


                  #53
                  all of this is s**te anyway, it seems like if you throw stones at me I will throw bigger stones at you ffs this is going on since the 50's and will still be going on in 2050 and perhaps go beyond that to[img]smileys/c&#111;nfused.gif[/img]
                  If a man tried to take his time on earth and prove before he died what one man's life could be worth, I wonder what would happen to this world

                  Comment


                    #54
                    Why would they do that[img]smileys/sad.gif[/img]
                    If a man tried to take his time on earth and prove before he died what one man's life could be worth, I wonder what would happen to this world

                    Comment


                      #55
                      Im actually a supporter of Israel in general - there smack
                      bang in the middle of countries ruled by islamic mentalists
                      who are hell bent on their destruction - however this has
                      disgusted me. Kill every hamas member at your will, but
                      never carelessly and knowingly kill innocent civilians.
                      There ignorance towards the developing humanitarian
                      situation is shocking.

                      Comment


                        #56
                        Haven't been paying much attention to the news this holiday season so this came as a bolt.

                        280 dead, Jesus wept.

                        Thanks for the updates HD.

                        If you think the system is working, ask someone who isn\'t.

                        Comment


                          #57
                          Originally posted by Humpty Dumpty
                          Why would they do
                          that[img]smileys/sad.gif[/img]
                          Increase casualty numbers?
                          Shameless self promotion time ladies and gents!
                          Munster: Early Season
                          Munster: Escape from Pool of Death
                          Munster: HEC Champions 2007/2008
                          Munster: Full Season Highlights.

                          Comment


                            #58
                            Israel is the biggest terrorist entity in the region, it has killed Palestinians for over half a century, occupation of Palestine must end, its the cause of all these problems. The apartheid system in S. Africa had the best killing machines on the continent, they had a good press network to misguide the public. In S. Africa, the apartheid gov't killed many innocent women, kids, students, old etc (they called them terrorists), its no different with what is happening in Gaza today.
                            Its shocking to see such a waste of life of the innocent school kids, there is no any justification for that. Boycott israel goods/products is the way forward, it brought the apartheid system in South Africa to its knees. Some of the profits from Coke, nescafe coffee, fox/time warner blockbuster movie, mac donalds contributed to buy arms that killed the Gaza school kids, they should be boycotted. if you dont buy isreal products its the begining of the end of the isreal occupation that has seen destruction, killing and chaos in the region. peace can be archieved but u have to be part of the peace process by taking the initative to boycot the aparthied isreal goods.

                            THE LAST KING OF IRELAND

                            Comment


                              #59
                              Originally posted by Cathal
                              Originally posted by Humpty Dumpty
                              Why would they do
                              that[img]smileys/sad.gif[/img]

                              Increase casualty numbers?

                              Wouldn't really surprise me if it was true, Hamas are obviously willing to sacrifice Palestinian lives for the furtherance of their cause, which is why they built so many installations which were likely to be targetted inheavily populatedareas.


                              That said it still takes a special kind of evil to bomb them.


                              Hamasunderstand the politics of the situation much better than most realise.


                              "It’s not the team you support, it’s the club you should support. The team on the pitch will ebb and flow because that’s the nature of sport. No team has ever been successful decade on decade. The club has the history and that’s the passion you should have."

                              Comment


                                #60
                                Originally posted by Jenta
                                ...which is why they built so many installations which
                                were likely to be targetted inheavily populatedareas.
                                Tbf it is a bit difficult not to in the most densely populated territory in the world.

                                If you think the system is working, ask someone who isn\'t.

                                Comment

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