Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Zimbabwe in Crisis

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    Zimbabwe in Crisis

    <DIV id=post_message_4392070>A crisis meeting of Robert Mugabe's security cabinet decided to block the opposition from taking power after what appears to have been a comprehensive victory in Zimbabwe's elections but was divided between using a military takeover to annul the vote and falsifying the results.

    Diplomatic and Zimbabwean sources who heard first-hand accounts of the Joint Operations Command meeting of senior military and intelligence officers and top party officials on Sunday night said Mugabe favoured immediately declaring himself president again but was persuaded to use the country's electoral commission to keep the opposition from power.

    The commission began releasing a trickle of results yesterday, more than 36 hours after the polls closed, but the opposition Movement for Democratic Change said it believed the count was being manipulated.

    Nonetheless, the first results, for 52 seats in the lower house of parliament, cost Mugabe one of his closest allies with the defeat of the justice minister, Patrick Chinamasa, whom the MDC has accused of abusing the law to persecute the ruling Zanu-PF party's opponents. Other cabinet ministers are also believed to have lost their seats.

    However, the few parliamentary results offered no guide to the outcome of the presidential race. Independent monitors collating the count from polling booth returns say the MDC presidential candidate, Morgan Tsvangirai, won about 55% of the vote and Mugabe 38%. The MDC also gained control of both houses of parliament, according to the monitors.

    The MDC said the slow pace of releasing vote tallies - likely to take days at the present rate - was further reason to suspect they were being tampered with.

    Sources with knowledge of the JOC meeting said the Zanu-PF leadership was "in shock" after it was informed of the scale of the victory of the MDC's presidential candidate, Morgan Tsvangirai.

    A senior diplomatic source who received accounts from two people privy to the JOC meeting said it discussed shutting down the count and Mugabe declaring himself re-elected or the army stepping in to declare martial law on the pretext of defending the country from instability caused by the opposition claiming victory.

    "In the JOC meeting there were two options for Mugabe: to declare victory on Sunday or declare martial law," said the diplomat. "They did not consider conceding. We understand Mugabe nearly decided to declare victory. Cooler heads prevailed. It was decided to use the [election commission] process of drip, drip where you release results over a long period, giving the opposition gains at first but as time wears on Zanu-PF pulls ahead."

    Another source said that some JOC members favoured a less hardline approach by reaching out to the opposition but were overruled.

    If the government does attempt to fix the result it will not go unchallenged. The election commission will have to substantially alter a large number of polling booth returns in order to overturn Tsvangirai's significant lead. But the MDC has photographed results declarations pinned to the doors of more than 8,000 polling stations. If the numbers announced by the election commission are different, the party says it will have indisputable evidence of fraud.

    "Unlike previous elections no one can privatise the result as it is posted outside the stations," said the MDC's secretary general, Tendai Biti. "This country stands on a precipice. We still express our great misgivings about [the election commission's] failure to announce the results. It raises tension among the people that is fertilising an atmosphere of suspicion."

    The opposition is attempting to reach out to the military. A senior MDC source said Tsvangirai has approached the former army chief, Solomon Mujuru, to reassure the military that it has nothing to fear from a transition of power and to ask what its concerns are so they can be addressed.

    M
    "It’s not the team you support, it’s the club you should support. The team on the pitch will ebb and flow because that’s the nature of sport. No team has ever been successful decade on decade. The club has the history and that’s the passion you should have."

    #2


    No oil there, so nothing will be done.....


    Zimbabwe, Darfur and Tibet....but yet the Allied forces continue to invade Iraq !

    Comment


      #3
      This Mugabe muppet needs to be taken out.
      "Isn't it enough to see that a garden is beautiful without having to believe that there are fairies at the bottom of it too ?" - Douglas Adams

      Comment


        #4
        Was listening to the Beeb World Service last night, and they had a good documentary on Zimbabwe. Inflation is running at 100,000% per annum (not a mistype). Basically, prices are doubling every 20 minutes.

        No surprise to hear that the world is shrugging it's shoulders at Zimbawbe. Can't decide if the Brits are genuinely interested in helping, or feel they have a moral obligation as past colonial masters of Zimbabwe. Terrible thing, guilt.

        Please support Milford Hospice. Click here to donate.

        Comment


          #5

          Who would have thought Mugabe could turn out to be worse than Smith?

          Really don't see what can be done, only SA has the necessary presence to affect change there and so far it has favoured a softly, softly approach.

          It is useless to attempt to reason a man out of a thing he was never reasoned into.

          Every plan I have is the best plan in the room. Everybody get quiet and listen to it, and everybody will win

          Comment


            #6


            Originally posted by JoeyFantastic

            Really don't see what can be done, only SA has the necessary presence to affect change there and so far it has favoured a softly, softly approach.

            Small but powerful article from a SA newspaper:


            http://www.thetimes.co.za/News/Article.aspx?id=736745
            "It’s not the team you support, it’s the club you should support. The team on the pitch will ebb and flow because that’s the nature of sport. No team has ever been successful decade on decade. The club has the history and that’s the passion you should have."

            Comment


              #7

              Originally posted by fitzy73
              Was listening to the Beeb World Service last night, and they had a good documentary on Zimbabwe. Inflation is running at 100,000% per annum (not a mistype). Basically, prices are doubling every 20 minutes.

              No surprise to hear that the world is shrugging it's shoulders at Zimbawbe. Can't decide if the Brits are genuinely interested in helping, or feel they have a moral obligation as past colonial masters of Zimbabwe. Terrible thing, guilt.
              Probably a bit of both from a British point of view, course, there is an ever-dwindling number of white settlers still out there.
              It is useless to attempt to reason a man out of a thing he was never reasoned into.

              Every plan I have is the best plan in the room. Everybody get quiet and listen to it, and everybody will win

              Comment


                #8
                What are the Brits supposed to do exactly? There is no easy answer and short of sending troops in and taking over which no one wants what power have they?
                My computer thinks I'm gay
                What's the difference anyway
                When all the people do all day
                Is stare into a phone

                Comment


                  #9
                  Originally posted by Bitter As A Lemon


                  No oil there, so nothing will be done.....


                  Zimbabwe, Darfur and Tibet....but yet the Allied forces continue to invade Iraq !


                  Invade Darfur and the West will be accused of going after Muslims again (despite the fact Muslims were freed from persecution in Kosovo and indeed in Afghanistan). Invade Tibet and you'll cause WWIII. Invade Zimbabwe and the West will be accused of neo-colonialism.

                  Comment


                    #10

                    Originally posted by sewa
                    What are the Brits supposed to do exactly? There is no easy answer and short of sending troops in and taking over which no one wants what power have they?
                    Well they were pretty hot on going through the UN for sanctions against Iraq, but have made some half hearted pleas to the UN and to the EU re Zimbabwe. I agree though that there isn't much in practical terms they can do.
                    Please support Milford Hospice. Click here to donate.

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Originally posted by blackadder
                      Originally posted by Bitter As A Lemon


                      No oil there, so nothing will be done.....


                      Zimbabwe, Darfur and Tibet....but yet the Allied forces continue to invade Iraq !


                      Invade Darfur and the West will be accused of going after Muslims again (despite the fact Muslims were freed from persecution in Kosovo and indeed in Afghanistan). Invade Tibet and you'll cause WWIII. Invade Zimbabwe and the West will be accused of neo-colonialism.


                      From a Islamic regime?

                      Comment


                        #12
                        Originally posted by HandsomeMacCool
                        Originally posted by blackadder
                        Originally posted by Bitter As A Lemon


                        No oil there, so nothing will be done.....


                        Zimbabwe, Darfur and Tibet....but yet the Allied forces continue to invade Iraq !


                        Invade Darfur and the West will be accused of going after Muslims again (despite the fact Muslims were freed from persecution in Kosovo and indeed in Afghanistan). Invade Tibet and you'll cause WWIII. Invade Zimbabwe and the West will be accused of neo-colonialism.


                        From a Islamic regime?


                        From the Taliban who persecuted anything and everything, in the most barbaric manner, that they didn't agree with. Unfortunately the Taliban are still strong in many parts of that country.


                        Back on topic one offour things will happen in Zimbabwe


                        1) Mugabe will accept the will of the people and stand down (very unlikely you'd think)


                        2) He'll stay on as President and maybe allow the opposition control of the Parliament


                        3) He'll launch a military crackdown on his opponents


                        4) His opponents will rise against him like what happened in Kenya and many people will die


                        I think options 2 or 3 seem the most likely. If option 4 happens then i think the West should support the opposition in one way or another. Maybe the EU or UN or UK or whoever could send an aircraft carrier to the area and use that as a threat to Mugabe, i'm not saying they use it but the threat of force added to the will of the Zimbabwean people might force this tyrant out of power as well as embolding the opposition and possibly forcing some of Mugabe's allies to turn on him.The problem with the UK doing this is that it could be seen as neo-colonialism as i suggested earlier.

                        Comment


                          #13
                          Option 3 is the most likely thing to happen.
                          Excellence is hard to keep quite - Sherrie Coale

                          Comment


                            #14


                            Originally posted by blackadder
                            [. Maybe the EU or UN or UK or whoever could send an aircraft carrier to the area and use that as a threat to Mugabe,




                            Blackadder have you looked at a map of the area recently? Harare is about 150 miles from the border with Mozambique which is about another 150 miles from the coast. What threat would an aircraft carrier over three hundred miles away be? or am I underestimating the range of the modern fighter/bomberthat can take off from an Aricraft carrier?

                            Comment


                              #15
                              Amodern jet can cover 300 miles injust over20 minutes.....

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X