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    #16


    i used to squat that to where my thigh's were parrallell to the ground. was in gym in UL years ago and players from Irish soccer team were there, they were some joke, couldnt lift a pound of butter!!
    |^^^^^^^^^^^^^^|
    | MUNSTER RUGBY| \'|\"\"\";.., ___.
    |_..._...______===|= _|__|..., ] |
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      #17


      "have seen what irish international rugby players call Squats and its a half arsed 3/4 squat. a proper squat should be bringing your thighs as fair down as they can go .i saw the SA weights requirements and the squat Req for them was 1.5 Body weight "





      was in SA and i agree 100%- squatting twice your body weight i was told there= incorrect technique . and bearing in mind we're talking about the biggest rugby players on the planet(and the most powerful)- the most i saw was 1.5 times their body weight and these were professional super 14 rugby players. they went fairly deep on the squat but not to the extent they were doing damage to the joints.


      is it any wonder english forwards are the most immobile in the world- i mean for all their size they don't produce the power athletes the southern hemisphere produce or even a david wallace.

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        #18
        Originally posted by shambo


        "have seen what irish international rugby players call Squats and its a half arsed 3/4 squat. a proper squat should be bringing your thighs as fair down as they can go .i saw the SA weights requirements and the squat Req for them was 1.5 Body weight "





        was in SA and i agree 100%- squatting twice your body weight i was told there= incorrect technique . and bearing in mind we're talking about the biggest rugby players on the planet(and the most powerful)- the most i saw was 1.5 times their body weight and these were professional super 14 rugby players. they went fairly deep on the squat but not to the extent they were doing damage to the joints.


        is it any wonder english forwards are the most immobile in the world- i mean for all their size they don't produce the power athletes the southern hemisphere produce or even a david wallace.


        Not according to many world class coaches
        |^^^^^^^^^^^^^^|
        | MUNSTER RUGBY| \'|\"\"\";.., ___.
        |_..._...______===|= _|__|..., ] |
        \"(@ )\'(@ )\"\"\"\"*|(@ )(@ )*****(@)

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          #19
          well i dunno it's not that many years ago and they were concerned that squatting twice your body weight can put excess pressure on the joints especially the knees- i'm talking deep squats here virtually all the way down.in the sense that powerlifters don't have to run around a rugby pitch while rugby players do.mind you they used to do some other weights exercises that i've rarely seen since. seemed to be a huge emphasis on core stability/plyometric training - a greater emphasis than here- in particular that is an area we're only catching up on.

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            #20

            Originally posted by munster_mafia

            i used to squat that to where my thigh's were parrallell to the ground. was in gym in UL years ago and players from Irish soccer team were there, they were some joke, couldnt lift a pound of butter!!
            Sweet lift then! I've had to relearn how to squat completely because I had terrible technique but I'm moving up now thank god. Trying to bring it to a respectable number. Once my rugby days are over I'll probably do a bit of powerlifting but I've got a long way to go.
            Kiva - Loans That Change Lives

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              #21


              Originally posted by Spoof
              Part of teh reason that they dont do full squats is because it is not specific to rugby. When is a player going to be down in a full squat during a game. For props, all the power for the intial hit will come from the half/ 3/4 position

              Nail on the head. Weight lifting for rugby and all other sports other than weightlifting is not about howmuch weightyou can lift and how far down you go in the squat.


              Its more beneficial to do more repetitions at alower weight for someone who has to do a lot of running. High weight and low repetitions slows your muscles down.

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                #22
                Full squats will improve hamstring development which will help in many many ways (sprinting etc.) in fact BODs constant hamstring injuries is a tell tale sign of quadricep dominance over the hamstrings.

                If Olympic sprinters find full squats useful rugby players should find it plenty useful too. I don't buy it, the reason I didn't do full squats until quite recently was because the level of coaching I received growing up was terrible. It was only when I got online in more recent years I actually learned something.

                When I was thought how to squat it was a pure ego exercise in the school weights room of throwing as much on the bar as possible.


                Originally posted by Goofy

                Its more beneficial to do more repetitions at alower
                weight for someone who has to do a lot of running. High weight and low
                repetitions slows your muscles down.
                The opposite is more likely to be true, not that it is either. Lower weight and more reps would most likely give more hypertrophy and if anything is going to slow you down that will. Again I'm going to mention sprinters they have no issue being slowed down doing high weight low rep squats, cleans etc...



                Kiva - Loans That Change Lives

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                  #23
                  To lift very heavy weights requires almost maximal activation of the motor units in the working muscle, say your quads in a squat. There's some debate as to whether it's actually possible to activate all your motor units at the one time in a given muscle. If you electrically stimulate a muscle at high frequencies you'll get a very high degree of activation, but that is in a lab setting and more often than not it's only done with whole muscle that has been removed from an animal subject like a rat or something. Still though, to lift a very heavy weight is as much a mechanism of the nervous system as it is of the muscular system. If you are doing any sport that requires power and explosiveness you will need to be able to activate a high % of motor units, very quickly. Your body will recruit motor units starting with slow-twitch, oxidative units first. As demand increases then the fast-twitch, glycolytic motor units will be recruited. This is called the principle of orderly recruitment. If you are coming out of the blocks at the start of a 100m sprint you will need the maximum response you can generate from the leg muscles. Another factor is the cross-sectional area of a particular muscle. The amount of force you are capable of generating is directly proportional to the c/s area. People sometimes say when they hear this, "What about those little tiny lads you see lifting weights in the Olympics?" It's true that lightweight powerlifters and weightlifters are far stronger than the average Joe Bloggs who is bigger than them, but they have incredibly highly trained neuromuscular systems. They're pretty much as close as they can get to maximal motor unit activation. Female athletes such as Derval O'Rourke would do a good bit of power training I'd imagine, doing power-cleans and the like. You will get bigger doing power training but it is quite different physiologically in how it works and affects your body to say a body-building programme.
                  Grandpa Simpson: The last time the meteors came, we thought the sky was on fire. Naturally, we blamed the Irish. We hanged more \'n a few.

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