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    Rugby 7's and other Athletes

    What do people make of the recruitment of other athletes into the Current Women's Sevens Program?

    Will it work to recruit ( as the IRFU are ) from athletics etc.

    Are some of these people simply jumping to rugby having failed to qualify through their own sports???

    What do folks think?



    Also, still no men's Program announced yet ( That I have heard ). I have heard that it is coming soon and it may recruit its players from the B&I Cup teams only? . . .so as to spare the National team/ Provincial Senior Teams and the Clubs.

    Could the mens program do well to target athletes from other disciplines also . . . .like the women's program is.

    Gaelic Football, Athletics etc
    Last edited by Corcíoch; 2nd-May-2013, 09:53.

    #2
    i think it's necessary to recruit from other sports...athletism and speed are the main ingredients for 7s the rest can be tacked on..
    i was speaking to a coach with the Auckland blues recently and he said they have screening sessions for athletes from all sporting disciplines he also emphasized that NZ were determined to win the first olympic gold in 7s as they might not win again with the development of the game ...the irish womens 7s are doing nicely ,the world 7s will see how far they have progressed...the mens program if there is ever going to be one, if way behind at this stage,by just concentrating on the B&I players they hav't a hope they need to spread the net far and wide...

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      #3
      I get your point.

      I do know a chap personally who tried to Set up a 7's side in Jamaica many moons ago . . . by using Athletes from Athletics.

      That was a disaster. They were hopeless at Rugby skills.


      I suppose you need alot of time . . . . and balance of players with years of experience and the newly introduced athletes.

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        #4
        the cross over between 7s and 15s will become less in the future as the 7s game becomes more specialized...most of the top tier nations have pro squads at present with very little connection to 15s...Kenya defeated the All Blacks in the IRB world 7s recently...
        also i don't see any LEVEL 1 coaching courses for 7s being promoted by the IRFU these have been running in other countries for sometime,one would imagine this is where they would want to start...

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          #5
          all the women's national programmes have running screening/recruitment programs a lot of countries have had women transfer in from netball & hockey in particular. The assessment on Ireland's recruitment & rapid rise was that because we had girls coming from gaelic football in particular that made their transition & adaption to rugby exceptionally fast. Gaelic football being far closer to the skillset needed for rugby than any other womens sport world wide.

          Also there's been a massive rise in the number of women signing up for tag rugby this year as a result of the womens 6 nations success, and there's been rugby clubs gaining female players for XV's ever since tag rugby was first introduced. I expect the clubs will be recruiting with a vengance at the tag venues this summer.
          Plato: \"One of the penalties for refusing to participate in politics is that you end up being governed by your inferiors.\"

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            #6
            Originally posted by greenback View Post
            the cross over between 7s and 15s will become less in the future as the 7s game becomes more specialized...most of the top tier nations have pro squads at present with very little connection to 15s...Kenya defeated the All Blacks in the IRB world 7s recently...
            also i don't see any LEVEL 1 coaching courses for 7s being promoted by the IRFU these have been running in other countries for sometime,one would imagine this is where they would want to start...
            I dunno if thats true about the lack of connection to 15 . . . . . they are just not players from the Main International Squads.

            The AB's who are in the top 2 of the world series the last few years are using many if not all ITM Cup players. DJ Forbes, one of their best is a Flanker for Counties Manakau, played in the play offs of the ITM last year iirc.


            But yes indeed there are sides like Kenya who are competing well in 7's and are unheard of in 15's.

            Sides like that make the IRFU look like absolute clowns imo . . .Everyone from Norway to Cyprus from Sweeden to Brazil have 7's teams or have a program underway.

            I think its actually a disgrace that we don't.
            Last edited by Corcíoch; 2nd-May-2013, 11:32.

            Comment


              #7
              Originally posted by lahinch_lass View Post
              all the women's national programmes have running screening/recruitment programs a lot of countries have had women transfer in from netball & hockey in particular. The assessment on Ireland's recruitment & rapid rise was that because we had girls coming from gaelic football in particular that made their transition & adaption to rugby exceptionally fast. Gaelic football being far closer to the skillset needed for rugby than any other womens sport world wide.

              Also there's been a massive rise in the number of women signing up for tag rugby this year as a result of the womens 6 nations success, and there's been rugby clubs gaining female players for XV's ever since tag rugby was first introduced. I expect the clubs will be recruiting with a vengance at the tag venues this summer.
              I could see Gaelic Football players from some positions really doing well at 7's for certain.

              And they would queue up imo if the program was well run and professional.

              Comment


                #8
                what i meant about cross over is that the time requirment wont be ther at the highest level,the aerobic level of fitness required at 7s is much higher than 15s ...DJ Forbes stated recently that he was concentrating on the 7s on the run up to RIO as he could'nt both

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                  #9
                  Originally posted by Corcíoch View Post
                  I could see Gaelic Football players from some positions really doing well at 7's for certain.

                  And they would queue up imo if the program was well run and professional.
                  Definitely, see the likes of Emmet Bolton and Mark Mchugh haring round the place. 7s is all about fitness and speed. Halfbacks/halfforwards from Gaelic could be superb 7s players from the necessary requirements they have to have to play in these positions. And their ball-handling is gonna be solid.

                  Think more encourage has to come for kids to play multiple codes until 21s. They skills learned are very transferable, like going from rugby to football you have the ability to give and take a shoulder whilst going from football to rugby you'd be fitter and good under a high ball. Need to have more multi-disciplined players

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                    #10
                    Our women's coach is a former silver fern and has rugby league world cups and god know's how many 7's trophies and she loves the crossover players we have been able to get in to the club this season, particularly those from GAA and basketball.

                    Two of those made the Leinster women's squad before they ever played their first 80 minutes for the club(or ever). I think it's great and we are right to try and maximise it for the 7's game.

                    While i prefer 15's to 7's myself(prop- no shock there) at the next olympics 25% of Irish athletes will be rugby players and that is what is driving the crossover players.

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Originally posted by lahinch_lass View Post
                      all the women's national programmes have running screening/recruitment programs a lot of countries have had women transfer in from netball & hockey in particular. The assessment on Ireland's recruitment & rapid rise was that because we had girls coming from gaelic football in particular that made their transition & adaption to rugby exceptionally fast. Gaelic football being far closer to the skillset needed for rugby than any other womens sport world wide.

                      Also there's been a massive rise in the number of women signing up for tag rugby this year as a result of the womens 6 nations success, and there's been rugby clubs gaining female players for XV's ever since tag rugby was first introduced. I expect the clubs will be recruiting with a vengance at the tag venues this summer.
                      My understanding is that the new IRFU directives re the club game, as well as seeking to ban player payments, has set out the proposal/suggestion that ALL AIL clubs, and ALL top tier Junior clubs (i.e. div 1) must field an adult womens side as well as at least one underage side. P16

                      http://www.irishrugby.ie/downloads/I..._April2013.pdf

                      Comment


                        #12
                        Originally posted by bobbin View Post
                        My understanding is that the new IRFU directives re the club game, as well as seeking to ban player payments, has set out the proposal/suggestion that ALL AIL clubs, and ALL top tier Junior clubs (i.e. div 1) must field an adult womens side as well as at least one underage side. P16

                        http://www.irishrugby.ie/downloads/I..._April2013.pdf
                        now that would be a heck of a stretch goal ! Shannon Ladies conceeded 2 walkovers in the Cup this season due to lack of players, and during the league they didn't have a full bench at a single match.
                        Plato: \"One of the penalties for refusing to participate in politics is that you end up being governed by your inferiors.\"

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                          #13
                          Originally posted by Corcíoch View Post

                          I do know a chap personally who tried to Set up a 7's side in Jamaica many moons ago . . . by using Athletes from Athletics.

                          That was a disaster. They were hopeless at Rugby skills.

                          They were much better at the bobsleigh though


                          I think the IRFU have taken a decent balance approach to the 7's. looking insided and out of the game.

                          They have targeted certain players at under-18 provincial level in preperation for Brazil.

                          As it stands most of the better players in Womens rugby are good many different sports, And it only makes sense to look at Athletics where alot of the qualities work for both sports
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                            #14
                            Having been involved in setting up a women's team several moons ago, I'd say recruitment from other sports is essential. The unfortunate fact is that, through school and beyond, women generally don't have a very high participation rate in organised sport. There are some who do (and more power to them) but its not a cultural fixture in the same way as it is for young men.

                            It's therefore reasonable to assume that most of the women interested in playing a team sport in Ireland are already playing one. You also end up with players that, whatever their skill levels, are used to being coached and know how to train. That's a very big thing.

                            Having worked with both total greenhorns and cross over athletes, the latter were infinitely easier to work with and you had a far quicker idea of whether they would adapt.

                            I'd say the same for men, to be honest. A man that gets to his mid twenties without playing any form of sport has probably gotten to that point for a good reason. If you want to recruit for amateur teams, it will be people who've done something, somewhere.

                            For small nations like Jamaica, taking those who couldn't quite cut it in track would seem to be a rational choice, but you have to be ready to skill them up. The US team have done reasonably well out of track and football scholars.
                            "We will not walk in fear, one of another. We will not be driven into an age of unreason if we dig deep into our history and remember we are not descended from fearful men" Edward R Murrow

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                              #15
                              Originally posted by Balla Boy View Post
                              Having been involved in setting up a women's team several moons ago, I'd say recruitment from other sports is essential. The unfortunate fact is that, through school and beyond, women generally don't have a very high participation rate in organised sport. There are some who do (and more power to them) but its not a cultural fixture in the same way as it is for young men.

                              It's therefore reasonable to assume that most of the women interested in playing a team sport in Ireland are already playing one. You also end up with players that, whatever their skill levels, are used to being coached and know how to train. That's a very big thing.

                              Having worked with both total greenhorns and cross over athletes, the latter were infinitely easier to work with and you had a far quicker idea of whether they would adapt.

                              I'd say the same for men, to be honest. A man that gets to his mid twenties without playing any form of sport has probably gotten to that point for a good reason. If you want to recruit for amateur teams, it will be people who've done something, somewhere.

                              For small nations like Jamaica, taking those who couldn't quite cut it in track would seem to be a rational choice, but you have to be ready to skill them up. The US team have done reasonably well out of track and football scholars.
                              the Irish Sports Council have had an initative called "women in sport" in operation for over a decade now trying to improve the participation rates, what has been interesting in tag rugby is that there's women playing that game who've never played any sport to any great extent before, I've seen it with the teams I've been involved with, and one of the reasons for that has been the fact i was marketed as a social sport & the social aspect is every bit as important as the games.
                              To be quite honest all-girl team sport is rarely a pleasant environment as a teenager and I suspect it's that which puts so many women off sport to start with. I always did better on mixed teams than I ever did in all-girls teams in basketball or volleyball through school or afterwards.
                              Ironically I'm a volunteer at an all-womens surf weekend this weekend, where we'll be running lessons for women to introduce them to surfing in an all-female environment. We regularly get all ages at those weekends from kids to grannies which is great to see. Taster events are a great way to bring people into sport for the first time, particularly if you wrap it around other activities.
                              Plato: \"One of the penalties for refusing to participate in politics is that you end up being governed by your inferiors.\"

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