Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

2nd Tist press build up

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    2nd Tist press build up

    http://www.nzherald.co.nz/rugby/news...ectid=10812142

    Hansen looks forward to chess game with Irish
    By Wynne Gray
    5:30 AM Monday Jun 11, 2012

    Rugby 101 came and went, now the All Blacks have to work
    on the rest of their education.

    They achieved a high pass mark in their debut under coach Steve
    Hansen, but the new ringmaster was cracking the vocal whip as the
    43,300 crowd dispersed from Eden Park.

    Hansen wants to balance work and play, he is an advocate of intense
    sessions leavened by other activities to round out players' welfare.

    He said the job for the second test in Christchurch was to go through
    their reviews, note what had or hadn't happened and go about fixing
    those areas on Saturday. It was part of the coaches and players' constant rugby education.

    This week, Hansen said, would be like a game of chess with the All Blacks
    and Ireland thinking about what to produce in Christchurch.

    "We have got to be smart with our review process and think how we can
    take advantage of what we have done in this game to find space and score
    tries," he said after their opening 42-10 victory.

    The Irish reaction would be interesting in the next two tests as they tried
    to stem the black tide.

    "They will look at their own game and look to improve that as well and that
    is exactly what we have to do."

    The breakdown would be an area for the All Blacks to concentrate on this
    week and both teams would be devising ideas to help their game and hinder their rivals.

    "We call it the ABCs," Hansen said.
    "You Assume a lot because you have video of the game, you Believe
    nothing and you Confirm it on game day."

    Channelling much of that emphasis is captain Richie McCaw, who said the
    senior players and management were driving the attitude and standards needed in test rugby.

    "We were pretty determined not just to roll in and expect it to happen,"
    he said of the side's return to test rugby after the World Cup.
    "We have gone right back to the start and made sure that we did the little
    things that ensure we get the performance.
    "We have got a wee way to go for the game we are after but in terms of that,
    it has to be led from the top.
    "It is good to have a laugh at times and make sure we work hard when
    we are on the job.
    "We have done things a bit different from last year but we have also
    kept the things that have worked for us in the past and I think that
    has been a good mix."

    Hansen was encouraged by the mix in his squad and the way they had
    gelled. He wanted experienced players and also to promote young,
    exciting talent to understand the demands of test rugby.

    When he was coaching Wales he learned how tough it was to dispense
    with experienced players.

    "It is a tough old game, test rugby," Hansen said.

    "It is just totally different from anything else and if you ask the guys in the
    shed who have been playing well for their franchises, to a man they will say
    it was good to wake up to test rugby again, here we go."

    Playing internationals was not just about physical prowess. It also required
    mental application to cope when things went awry.


    One of the themes in this first week had been asking the senior All Blacks to lead.

    They had created previous high standards and they needed to return and
    perform at those levels. That made it easier for newer squad members to
    perform their duties.
    Last edited by mtcmolloy; 11-June-2012, 16:09.

    #2
    Excellent news
    "There are a lot of points that we’ve left behind and this is with a young group. That probably tells you what they’re capable of and that they’re a very good side.

    Probably next year or the year after next they will take some stopping"

    Anthony Foley, May 2016. Axel RIP

    Comment


      #3
      What an arrogant article. Can you imagine the reaction if this was in the English press prior to an Ireland - England match, even one where the English, like NZ, are expected to indeed hammer Ireland?

      Comment


        #4
        sad but true. that said he must have been watching a different front row. The article would make great dressing room fodder.

        Comment


          #5
          http://www.nzherald.co.nz/rugby/news...ectid=10812123


          Hapless Irish ripe for crushing
          By Chris Rattue
          5:30 AM Monday Jun 11, 2012

          The Irish are in for one helluva hiding in the second test, and
          heaven help them in the third.

          The forlorn hope a few of us old romantics had of an epic contest
          unfolding in this historic three-game series was laid to rest in the
          first half of the opening test at Eden Park.

          The Irish, battered and bruised after a long and unsuccessful season,
          ended up with more lumps knocked out of their front row and, the
          fact is, the mob that has ended up in this country isn't good enough to beat the All Blacks anyway.

          Ireland had to be in fine fettle, with their spirits high, to test the
          home side. They needed a feasible game plan to work off. Yes, the
          TV commentators gushed as Ireland chucked the ball around early
          on, but a decidedly inferior team playing wild rugby against the All
          Blacks in this country represents an invitation to disaster.

          Those Irish salvos looked more like attempts to have something in
          the bank to save face with before the inevitable landslide buried them. Which it did.

          The concerning aspect for the Irish, and those of us thirsting for a
          quality museum piece rather than an exhibition, is that the All Blacks
          didn't win going away. They triumphed by a whopping 32 points despite
          stalling for much of the second half for no particular reason - and certainly
          not one involving anything memorable from Ireland.

          They won't stall again.
          Trench warfare, slowing the game down and kicking with brains - those had to
          be the battle cries if the Irish were serious about this assignment. Only a
          tough-nut forward pack and halves prepared to play clever percentages
          would get close to getting this job done. In other words, they needed to
          play like England did in 2003.

          Had Ireland brought over their very best pack, and not suffered a weird
          list of injuries to their props after arriving here, they may have had a chance ... of creating a contest. Maybe.

          But they haven't and are in danger now of sending out a front row ripe
          to be crushed into the ground in Christchurch and Hamilton.

          In the sort of form Daniel Carter has already shown, and with Sonny Bill
          Williams yet to unleash his big guns, you can only fear for the Irish. If a
          rampant Ma'a Nonu gets a shot, they will be in just as much trouble.

          The All Blacks fell into a hole in the second half and, in particular, it is
          difficult to work out what the war-torn Ali Williams is still doing in the
          test side when younger firebrands such as Luke Romano and Jarrad
          Hoeata are itching to get test careers underway.

          Williams isn't needed in this series and sadly his race is almost run
          because leg injuries have deleted his significant X-factor. No replacement
          stood out on Saturday night though.

          Even those of us who still support Piri Weepu would admit he was a l
          emon in the second half. Weepu needs to start tests to find his game,
          but Aaron Smith will be hard to dislodge.

          The sun may be setting on Ali, but not so the other Williams, whose
          best is yet to come. Ireland did a good job of snuffing out the offloading
          danger he presents, partly because his new All Black coaches didn't do anything
          subtle or creative around him. No doubt they concentrated heavily on the basics
          for the first test.

          But Ireland won't be able to hold SBW for much longer. If Sonny Bill gets his
          best game out, and the All Black bench pulls its weight instead of fluffing about
          as in Auckland, then 60 points is well within reach.

          Perhaps a difference between the All Blacks and the other major teams over
          history is that they are more ruthless for the kill. Right now, Richie McCaw's
          troops smell blood.
          Last edited by mtcmolloy; 11-June-2012, 15:53.

          Comment


            #6
            http://www.nzherald.co.nz/rugby/news...ectid=10812073


            Rugby: Irish future looks All Black
            By Wynne Gray
            5:30 AM Monday Jun 11, 2012
            The All Blacks need to work on their ABCs; the Irish can see Another Beating Coming.

            If there was optimism that Ireland would offer a decent first-up inquisition at Eden Park,
            they evaporated against the focus and pace of the All Blacks.

            Spectators who revel in blood sports will be hunting any last tickets for Christchurch and
            Hamilton, which have become must-attend venues for more Celtic gore.

            The matadors, picadors and cuadrillas all wore black while the victims were clad in target
            green. There was some resistance but nowhere near as much as anticipated.

            Ireland simply could not cope with the intensity and speed of the test. They played at a
            pace which was at least a cog slower than their hosts and were lucky the scoreline clocked off at 42-10.

            It was not unreasonable to think of another handful of times when the All Blacks should have scored.
            That would have been simply embarrassing for the visitors who were under duress before they arrived.

            They have been in rugby mode for almost a year and lost a handful of influential senior men before
            the tour began.

            Now they face more injury ravages in their front row and there is talk of calling for replacements.

            There was a chilling edge to the All Blacks' work, a bite which has not always been present in the
            opening of a new international season. Sure, they made mistakes in execution and decisions as
            every international side does.

            However, there was a warmth of performance throughout. The setpieces were strong and accurate,
            the breakdown was the usual mix of good and bad, while the backline offered a blend of bludgeon
            and rapier through the straight-alley running of Sonny Bill Williams or the spread to the flanks for
            Israel Dagg and Julian Savea to bust their moves.

            Savea nailed three tries on debut and a suggestion of further carnage in the series while Dagg
            ghosted around, flipping his engine into overdrive to deliver havoc, though he turned his antennae
            off when he ran Zac Guildford out of room instead of drawing the last defender. There was also
            another wobbly transfer, but Savea clung on and claimed his hat-trick.

            Coach Steve Hansen had watched several replays of the test and was happy at how the quickly the
            All Blacks had gelled.

            "What we were looking for was a really good attitude and some form of patterns that we could work
            on but you also expect the team to take a bit of time to gel when they are coming from five different
            teams," Hansen said.

            The side had played with some freedom, which had not always been apparent in last season's
            pressure-filled World Cup programme, but the All Blacks had sorted that drama and were now
            on a new adventure.

            "This is just a different era and we are starting again and I am quite a relaxed person myself so
            when we are not training and working, from my point of view, it is all right to chill out. For me it
            is about preparing well and if we do that we will get a performance we are proud of and nine times
            out of 10 that is going to be good enough to win most test matches."

            Hansen's greatest pleasure was in the lines of attack. There was a directness about that and then
            the variations to the edges of Eden Park which bedevilled the Irish.

            The garnish was Aaron Smith's delivery which liberated players all around him.

            Hansen and his selectors had watched the halfback intently since his early work in the Super 15
            and they figured "if he could cope with the physicality and he started showing us he could, then
            he had the game to play test rugby.

            "If you have got a halfback who can clear the ball as quick as he can ... he is a bit of a freak in that
            area and we haven't had anyone like that since Graeme Bachop."

            Comment


              #7
              http://www.nzherald.co.nz/rugby/news...ectid=10812078

              Rugby: Hansen unlikely to make changes
              By Kris Shannon
              5:30 AM Monday Jun 11, 2012

              All Blacks coach Steve Hansen is unlikely to deviate from the side that dispatched
              Ireland last night - but he may be forced into at least one change.

              The All Blacks will looked to take an unassailable 2-0 lead in the three-match series
              when the sides clash in Christchurch next weekend, and Hansen said he won't make many changes from the team that ran out 42-10 victors at Eden Park.

              One switch may be required, though, with Victor Vito struggling after straining a
              medial ligament in his right knee. The blindside flanker was forced from the field midway
              through the second half after suffering a head clash with Brian O'Driscoll, but it's not
              the cut which could keep him sidelined for the second test.

              "We're not sure where that's going to go, so we'll just give it a couple of days and
              make some assessments after that," Hansen said. "I don't think there will be too many [changes]."

              If the knee injury does keep Vito from the test, Hansen said the All Blacks would
              stick with the squad they have rather than call for reinforcements. Vito's logical
              replacement is Highlanders flanker Adam Thomson, who came on for the Hurricanes
              man last night before scoring the All Blacks' fourth try.

              Aside from the potential switch on the side of the scrum, Hansen saw no reason to alter
              from the starting XV which made an emphatic statement of intent in the opening test of the season.

              "The first two tests I think are about establishing ourselves," he said. "Then, if we have
              the opportunity and a bit of breathing space, we might make one or two changes.
              It would be nice to be able to introduce a couple of other young players into test rugby,
              whether it's off the bench or starting."

              One player who is pressing for selection is Blues hooker Keven Mealamu, who has been
              hampered by a calf injury all season.

              "He could probably play this week," Hansen said. "But we'll look to be cautious with him
              because it's a repeat injury. Give him another week and then we'll be pretty confident that he can come out and play."

              The coach, in his first game in charge of the national side, admitted the performance
              exceeded even his own expectations, as a hat-trick for debutant Julian Savea and tries
              to Thomson and Conrad Smith proved more than enough to maintain the All Blacks' unbeaten record against Ireland.

              "What we were looking for was a really good attitude and to try and establish some
              forms of patterns that we've been working on. But you also expect your team to take
              a while to jell when they're coming from five different teams - and they jelled pretty quickly, to be fair, so I'm very happy."

              Hansen said he has watched the game twice - "once last night when I was probably a
              little fogged with a couple of red wines" - and he was impressed with the work of the
              three debutantes, particularly Chiefs lock Brodie Retallick.

              "I felt he played really well. He did a lot of unrewarded work that you don't really get
              lots of pats on the back for, but the team needs you to do it. Defensively, he was outstanding.

              "He's got to be pretty happy with how he's started."

              As do the rest of the team. The team for the second test will be named on Thursday but,
              after such a comprehensive victory with few signs of rust, expect to see a similar side run
              out for the first time at the new Christchurch Stadium.

              Comment


                #8
                Originally posted by mtcmolloy View Post
                http://www.nzherald.co.nz/rugby/news...ectid=10812142




                Playing internationals was not just about physical prowess. It also required
                mental application to cope when things went awry.

                I find this and other comments telling.. he also mentioned He wanted
                to see leadership from the senior players..... that this was central.
                Kind of like diametric opposite of what we are seeing with the irish lads..
                heaslip pushing a scrum while the ball is already out in the centres.. etc

                Can't we just get this guy to give a 5 minute talk to the irish before the
                next game.

                And get les Kiss to talk to their lads....

                Comment


                  #9
                  Originally posted by mtcmolloy View Post
                  http://www.nzherald.co.nz/rugby/news...ectid=10812123


                  Hapless Irish ripe for crushing
                  By Chris Rattue
                  5:30 AM Monday Jun 11, 2012

                  The Irish are in for one helluva hiding in the second test, and
                  heaven help them in the third.

                  The forlorn hope a few of us old romantics had of an epic contest
                  unfolding in this historic three-game series was laid to rest in the
                  first half of the opening test at Eden Park.

                  The Irish, battered and bruised after a long and unsuccessful season,
                  ended up with more lumps knocked out of their front row and, the
                  fact is, the mob that has ended up in this country isn't good enough to beat the All Blacks anyway.

                  Ireland had to be in fine fettle, with their spirits high, to test the
                  home side. They needed a feasible game plan to work off. Yes, the
                  TV commentators gushed as Ireland chucked the ball around early
                  on, but a decidedly inferior team playing wild rugby against the All
                  Blacks in this country represents an invitation to disaster.

                  Those Irish salvos looked more like attempts to have something in
                  the bank to save face with before the inevitable landslide buried them. Which it did.

                  The concerning aspect for the Irish, and those of us thirsting for a
                  quality museum piece rather than an exhibition, is that the All Blacks
                  didn't win going away. They triumphed by a whopping 32 points despite
                  stalling for much of the second half for no particular reason - and certainly
                  not one involving anything memorable from Ireland.

                  They won't stall again.
                  Trench warfare, slowing the game down and kicking with brains - those had to
                  be the battle cries if the Irish were serious about this assignment. Only a
                  tough-nut forward pack and halves prepared to play clever percentages
                  would get close to getting this job done. In other words, they needed to
                  play like England did in 2003.

                  Had Ireland brought over their very best pack, and not suffered a weird
                  list of injuries to their props after arriving here, they may have had a chance ... of creating a contest. Maybe.

                  But they haven't and are in danger now of sending out a front row ripe
                  to be crushed into the ground in Christchurch and Hamilton.

                  In the sort of form Daniel Carter has already shown, and with Sonny Bill
                  Williams yet to unleash his big guns, you can only fear for the Irish. If a
                  rampant Ma'a Nonu gets a shot, they will be in just as much trouble.

                  The All Blacks fell into a hole in the second half and, in particular, it is
                  difficult to work out what the war-torn Ali Williams is still doing in the
                  test side when younger firebrands such as Luke Romano and Jarrad
                  Hoeata are itching to get test careers underway.

                  Williams isn't needed in this series and sadly his race is almost run
                  because leg injuries have deleted his significant X-factor. No replacement
                  stood out on Saturday night though.

                  Even those of us who still support Piri Weepu would admit he was a l
                  emon in the second half. Weepu needs to start tests to find his game,
                  but Aaron Smith will be hard to dislodge.

                  The sun may be setting on Ali, but not so the other Williams, whose
                  best is yet to come. Ireland did a good job of snuffing out the offloading
                  danger he presents, partly because his new All Black coaches didn't do anything
                  subtle or creative around him. No doubt they concentrated heavily on the basics
                  for the first test.

                  But Ireland won't be able to hold SBW for much longer. If Sonny Bill gets his
                  best game out, and the All Black bench pulls its weight instead of fluffing about
                  as in Auckland, then 60 points is well within reach.

                  Perhaps a difference between the All Blacks and the other major teams over
                  history is that they are more ruthless for the kill. Right now, Richie McCaw's
                  troops smell blood.

                  Jesus was that actually in the herald? Nice eh!!

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Originally posted by BOK View Post
                    Jesus was that actually in the herald? Nice eh!!
                    yes.. it's the sort of thing I expected last week.
                    I suppose they can cut loose now.
                    Good luck to them. They gave us a promised high ding,
                    and more to come. Tough times for an irish player.
                    Who'd be in their shoes....
                    I wonder is jamie heaslip excited about this upcoming
                    challenge.

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Jesus they really lay it into us dont they
                      I am the million man.

                      Comment


                        #12
                        Originally posted by mtcmolloy View Post
                        yes.. it's the sort of thing I expected last week.
                        I suppose they can cut loose now.
                        Good luck to them. They gave us a promised high ding,
                        and more to come. Tough times for an irish player.
                        Who'd be in their shoes....
                        I wonder is jamie heaslip excited about this upcoming
                        challenge.
                        Don't worry about Jamie. He'll just put his head down in the scrums so he can avoid making tackles. The guy is a disgrace to the jersey and it's a long time i've said that about an Irish player.

                        The sad thing about above articles is that you can't disagree with any of it. Are we back in the 90's. Dark dark times for Irish rugby.
                        Insanity: doing the same thing over and over again (like picking Gordon D'Arcy) and expecting different results.
                        Albert Einstein

                        Comment


                          #13
                          Originally posted by Mcork View Post
                          Don't worry about Jamie. He'll just put his head down in the scrums so he can avoid making tackles. The guy is a disgrace to the jersey and it's a long time i've said that about an Irish player.

                          The sad thing about above articles is that you can't disagree with any of it. Are we back in the 90's. Dark dark times for Irish rugby.
                          That really is the worrying thing isn't it? There are serious question marks hanging over a number of players regarding their international credentials though worryingly there are not a lot of other options putting their hands up.

                          To be honest though as I posted elsewhere it is now, if it wasn't before, officially a development tour. It is time to go for broke, cut into the arrogant bastards like there is no tomorrow. We were to lilly-livered last week, its blood and thunder time hopefully winning the kick off and running through them like a mad horde. Heaslip should be dropped to the bench at the very least, he doesn't look interested in playing for Ireland at present and thats the long and short of it.

                          As we have no real hope of beating them we need to pick things we wish to work on and try to do so under the pressure the AB's will exert on us. I don't buy into this kick to the corners thing, its simply handing them possession and as they showed on Saturday they are more than willing and capable of playing out of their own '22 with relative ease. Possession has to be the mantra and pure bloody-minded aggression when on the ball and when clearing the ball. I think we are relatively underpowered but that does not mean we should cower away. The side to side stuff doesn't work, we need some sort of invention to allow us to get players cutting straight hard lines in the midfield to at least try and get in behind them and cause havoc.

                          I'd also say we could see a different BOD on Saturday, i have only just considered that whilst it was undoubtedly one of his poorest games in an Irish shirt it was also his first appearance in one in over nine months so not exactly the easiest reintroduction to international rugby.

                          I don't personally buy into this dressing room wall stuff, they are THAT much better than us, no point reinforcing it to the players. What I would be focussing on is that they are human and if put under enough pressure they will crack, the issue is the pressure has to be applied constantly and relentlessly. Therein lies the problem, we could well be plucky enough for 50/60 minutes but we will bottom out and they will kill us.

                          Comment


                            #14
                            Conor Murray being lambasted in the NZ Herald today, Dan Tuohy too

                            Comment


                              #15
                              yes.. it's great reading the stuff over there. I love it.
                              I noticed two articles they have this week - adam thompson and kieran read. They both shipped
                              slaps on the snot in the last week... but it becomes newsworthy that they are |
                              tough enough to carry on regardless.
                              Kiwis, and especially ABs, are hard. No broken nose is going to stop them boyos.. : )


                              http://www.nzherald.co.nz/rugby/news...ectid=10812365

                              Rugby: Pace of All Black attack from turnovers leaves Irish behind
                              By Wynne Gray

                              Former All Black coach Charlie Saxton delivered sermons about
                              possession, position and pace as the pillars of the sport.

                              He preached those ideas many decades ago but the messages remain
                              just as relevant in the modern game.

                              Ireland have made reasonable inroads with two of the concepts but seem
                              lost against the speed of the game played by the All Blacks.

                              In a sport where turnovers have become a highly-valued commodity, pace
                              becomes so vital in using that possession to maximum effect.

                              It is also the weapon of choice in phase-play, when defenders start to get
                              strung out mentally and physically as they try to number up against the attacking side.

                              Julian Savea's cuts and Israel Dagg's slicing runs became great artillery as
                              the All Blacks outflanked the Irish.

                              It seemed they were a metre shy of coping, away from the closer contests
                              at the rucks, mauls and set-piece.

                              When possession started to zip around the pitch the Irish seemed to be
                              caught for pace and protection.

                              Combating some of those issues were themes for the Irish yesterday as they
                              reviewed their test work and talked through their hopes for Saturday's second
                              showdown in Christchurch.

                              Lock Donnacha Ryan spoke about Ireland's desire to up their pace this week and
                              communicate better on defence to cut down the All Blacks' space.

                              "Test matches are played at 100 miles an hour against the world champions and
                              concentration has to be at a premium," he said.

                              The Irish also needed to treasure possession. By their reckoning, they had turned
                              it over five times in the All Blacks' 22 and committed another eight unforced turnovers in their half.

                              "We have got to be smarter, particularly playing against New Zealand. We can't
                              afford to turn over the ball so easily," Ryan said.

                              Ireland will also be hoping their luck changes with injuries damaging their front-row resources.

                              They have not called for any front-row replacements but utility back Gavin Duffy
                              should arrive tomorrow to cover for Keith Earls, who has torn a chest muscle.


                              Loosehead prop Cian Healey is rated a 50-50 chance for the test because of
                              right shoulder damage, tighthead Declan Fitzpatrick remains a concern with a
                              gluteus muscle strain, but Mike Ross has trained well and should be fit.

                              The problem calling for backup is the lack of choice because of the overseas
                              props on the clubs' rosters.

                              Leinster have Heinke van der Meuwe and Nathan White, Munster use Wian du
                              Preez and BJ Botha, while Ulster have John Afoa as well as Peter Borlase.


                              The All Blacks have declared Crusaders star Kieran Read fit after his head knock
                              but were waiting for an update on Victor Vito, who suffered a medial knee ligament strain.

                              Any changes to the All Blacks are likely to be restricted because the coaching
                              staff want to build the players' combinations with continuity. Both teams would
                              have detail to ingest from the opening test and will be better for their second meeting.

                              "For us, we're just worrying about ourselves, we certainly know there's a lot of
                              areas we could be better," assistant coach Ian Foster said.

                              "We certainly left a few opportunities on the park, maybe with a little lack of
                              understanding of a few things and we'll just tweak them this week."

                              Ireland will visit the red zone in Christchurch tomorrow and meet a number of
                              people who were affected by the earthquakes.

                              This will be the All Blacks' first test in the city since they beat the Wallabies
                              20-10, two years ago.
                              Last edited by mtcmolloy; 12-June-2012, 08:52.

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X