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    What the papers say on Ireland 6 Nations

    Kidney: Smal will see out contract

    By Barry Coughlan
    Wednesday, January 25, 2012
    ANY doubts about Gert Smal’s future with Ireland were put to rest in Limerick yesterday when head coach Declan Kidney insisted the South African would be seeing out his contract, despite rumours linking him with a move home.
    Kidney, speaking at a press conference in the build up to Ireland’s Six Nations opener against Wales the weekend after next, confirmed he had spoken with Smal and had been assured the forwards coach was in Irish rugby for the long haul — in this case at least until his contract expires in June of next year.

    "He’s that type of man, you’d be speaking to him from the very start. He’ll be with us. His contract goes to June 12 months, he’ll be with us," said Kidney, who also confirmed he had been asked about his availability to have a coaching involvement with the British and Irish Lions next year.

    On that subject, Kidney said: "I got a call about it — I just said yeah, anyone would be interested in that — but I’m only thinking about beating Wales. I was asked a question about it... that’s it. You don’t say no to that, but at the same time I’m not chasing it."

    Kidney confirmed good news on the fitness of Jonathan Sexton, who participated in 80% of a training session yesterday, but also reported Leinster skipper Leo Cullen has been ruled out of the championship, having opted to have an operation on his troublesome Achilles. That operation was carried out yesterday after consultation with national and provincial coaches.

    Cullen is expected to be sidelined for between six and eight weeks and the coach commented: "He will be a loss to the squad but there is a lot of rugby to be played in the latter stages of the season, and it’s better he got the problem sorted now rather than having it snap and being out for six months."

    Cullen’s woe is good news for Munster number eight James Coughlan following a succession of high profile performances in the RaboDirect Pro12 and Heineken Cup over the last 12 months.

    "James is not a development player, he’s 31, but playing so well it would be wrong not to give him a chance," Kidney said.

    Anyone willing to lay bets on who Kidney will hand the number 13 jersey to in the absence of injured Brian O’Driscoll might have to hold off, the coach leaving the issue wide open when saying: "I’d have combinations in my head, there are a fair few players who have been playing there — Tommy [Bowe], Keith [Earls], Andrew [Trimble] in the past too. There are a number of combinations we could do, shape other fellas around Gordon [D’Arcy], Paddy [Wallace] — it’s all depending how you want to play."

    One thing is sure — Kidney hopes to find a winning formula between personnel from three winning Europe Cup teams. He described the achievement of Leinster, Munster and Ulster in getting to the Heineken Cup quarter finals as "brilliant."

    "I really do think it’s brilliant. We’ve had years where lads come in, one team qualified maybe and you’ll always spot the guys from the team who qualified and who didn’t. Now we’ve three; they were probably emotionally drained this morning but there’s no pressure — not at all. It’s brilliant to have them coming in like this."



    Read more: http://www.irishexaminer.com/sport/r...#ixzz1kSRR82pB
    Excellence is hard to keep quite - Sherrie Coale

    #2
    O’Gara targets Grand Slam, even without inspirational BOD

    By Barry Coughlan
    Wednesday, January 25, 2012
    RONAN O’GARA has tipped Ireland to launch a major offensive on the RBS 6 Nations Championship and sees no reason why they cannot garner another Grand Slam, even without the influence of injured skipper Brian O’Driscoll.
    It will be tough, says the veteran fly-half, but he figures the rich form of holders Leinster, Munster and Ulster in the Heineken Cup will help lay the foundations.

    Basking in the glory of Munster’s sensational defeat of Northampton to secure a home quarter-final against Ulster, O’Gara is ready for another challenge. He reflected on Munster’s win by saying: "Yeah, it was great. It was exactly what we needed, you know. We’d been playing in fits and starts for a lot of games but it probably wasn’t as bad as some people were making out. And Saturday wasn’t as good as some people are now making out."

    But while he referred briefly to the April encounter with Ulster, O’Gara was more inclined to think about what lies ahead in the coming weeks as Ireland go in search of glory.

    He believes focus is now more important than ever in the absence of O’Driscoll.

    "It is strange not having Brian around the place. First day of training, you’d be looking to see where he was. The session was a little bit mixed, usually when he is there the standards are really high. When he isn’t there I suppose somebody is going to have to take that role of leading the backs, it’s an area we have to ensure our standards are really high because I think it’s only when you take him out you realise how much of a presence he really is. He’s a class operator and will be missed."

    But he’s convinced Ireland can rise to the challenge, both to overcome O’Driscoll’s absence and to atone for what he described as a disappointing World Cup quarter-final against Wales, their opening Six Nations opponents. He doesn’t view it as an opportunity for revenge, rather an opportunity to put right a wrong.

    "You get 80 minutes to do your talking and we didn’t do it that day. I put my hand up and the rest of the team should put their hand up, we weren’t good enough."

    Whether O’Gara will be pulling the strings against Wales from the start or coming on board to play a supporting role to Jonathan Sexton will only be known closer to the day. But he’s in a happy place right now after a good personal World Cup and a sensational run to help Munster through to the last eight in Europe.

    An individual or team player then? "Contrary to what certain people think, that I’m difficult if I’m left out of the starting team, that’s not true. I would like to think that if my teammates came in here I’d be seen as the ultimate team man in terms of how I conduct myself, that is so important, that you have their respect, irrespective of what the public think.

    "What is important is the value you create for your team, the presence you carry in the squad, because I think that is so much more sometimes than playing ability because people who don’t take the field don’t understand essentially what is involved. You have so many mind games going on, so many games within games going on.

    "I’ve seen plenty of good players who, when the going gets tough, walk. You’ve got to have that ability to hang in there for each other and pick up for each other, stick up for each other and fight for every single point.

    "I realise exactly where I am at the minute, 34 going on 35. I just want to ensure we put ourselves in the best possible position to win a Grand Slam."


    Read more: http://www.irishexaminer.com/sport/r...#ixzz1kSS394Pf
    Excellence is hard to keep quite - Sherrie Coale

    Comment


      #3
      Cullen assists Irish training

      By Colm O’Connor
      Wednesday, January 25, 2012
      DUBLIN’S All-Ireland winning skipper Bryan Cullen is working with Ireland’s squad for the Six Nations.
      Cullen, a strength and conditioning coach with the Leinster sub-academy, was involved in yesterday’s sessions in Limerick.

      An IRFU spokesman said: "The IRFU are completing the process of appointing a new head of fitness. A strength and conditioning coach would follow that appointment. In the interim Leinster’s strength and conditioning coach Jason Cowman is working with the team and Bryan is assisting."



      Read more: http://www.irishexaminer.com/sport/r...#ixzz1kSSFdZCE
      Excellence is hard to keep quite - Sherrie Coale

      Comment


        #4
        Welsh revenge, O'Driscoll void and Lions job give coach food for thought
        By David kelly

        Wednesday January 25 2012

        LIFE WITHOUT BRIAN

        DECLAN KIDNEY bounds into Limerick's Strand Hotel restaurant with a familiarly jaunty step.

        He has been widely seen but rarely heard since Ireland's deeply disappointing World Cup quarter-final exit to Wales.

        Now, 107 days later, he has pitched up with his Irish squad in Limerick to plan a furiously compacted build-up to the Six Nations and, of course, facing Wales once more.

        One training session down, five to go before vengeance day and a match that will dictate the course of this championship.

        Should Ireland win, they will skip gaily to visit a France team under new management and with instability in their playing ranks. Lose and the guillotine sharpens.

        Everyone who turned up for training in Limerick yesterday contributed fully.

        But those who weren't there produced more conjecture: Brian O'Driscoll, who has an injury everybody knows about; Leo Cullen, who this week undergoes an operation that until recently nobody knew anything about; and Luke Fitzgerald, who has an injury it seems everybody is desperately trying to find out about.

        These and other questions occupied Kidney as he started plotting his fourth Six Nations campaign with Ireland, clearly hoping that it can become as successful a venture as his first.

        Kidney can only smile when asked this question -- for his captain's loss is simply incalculable.

        "You don't lose one of the best players in the world and it not have an effect on and off pitch," says the coach.

        "But Brian has always said, when he's played with Irish teams before that have lost players -- one man's loss is another's gain."

        Keith Earls is in pole position for the No 13 jersey, but canny Kidney will keep his selection cards locked in his bedside locker until next Wednesday.

        "I'd have combinations in my head because a fair few players have been playing there -- Keith, Tommy Bowe has played there, Andrew Trimble in the past too. (Fergus McFadden, mistakenly unmentioned, is also an option).

        "There are a number of other combinations we could do, shape other fellas around Gordon (D'Arcy) and Paddy (Wallace)... depending how you want to play the game."

        SMAL TALK

        After losing backs coach Alan Gaffney and team manager Paul McNaughton already, Ireland couldn't afford a third back-room casualty post-World Cup.

        The South African Rugby Union have been persistent in their quest to acquire their World Cup-winning forwards coach from 2003, Gert Smal, as their new supremo.

        Last Friday, Smal told the SARU that he would be refusing their offer, and the soap opera is likely to end in the unveiling of Heyneke Meyer this Friday.

        Smal's children are settled in school here, and the popular coach also feels that there is unfinished business with this Irish team -- and Kidney reiterated his commitment to the Irish cause.

        "He's that type of man," says Kidney. "You'd be speaking to him from the very start, and we have. He'll be with us. His contract goes to June 12 months. He'll be with us."

        LION KING IN WAITING

        The opening Six Nations game against Wales in Lansdowne Road on Sunday week is already being showcased as a sideshow to see who can emerge as the favourite to become the Lions head coach.

        Warren Gatland and Kidney are neck and neck in the race to lead the Lions to Australia in June 2013 -- unless the committee once more plump for the anachronism that is Ian McGeechan, to whom so many dull people defer so obsequiously.

        Kidney revealed yesterday that he has already received a check call from the Lions and he didn't seem all too delighted at being forced to reveal this.

        "I got a call about it," he says. "I just said 'yeah', anyone would be interested in that. But I'm only thinking about beating Wales. I was asked a question about it... that's it.

        "I'm more interested in just doing this. You don't say no to that, but at the same time I'm not chasing it."

        LEINSTER, LUKE, LEO AND HIS ACHILLES HEEL (WELL, TENDON ACTUALLY)

        According to Kidney, Cullen and himself had face-to-face talks before Christmas as it became increasingly apparent that the veteran second-row would have to undergo an Achilles operation at some stage.

        Perhaps that would explain why the player lined out for Leinster over the holiday while his international colleagues congregated in Carton House.

        Still, it makes Cullen and Leinster's anger at last week's exposure of the imminent operation a tad over-dramatic.

        On the face of it, Kidney feels no remorse that Cullen chose to play through the pain barrier with club, rather than country -- as Cullen would have been unlikely to have been involved against Wales anyway.

        "It's a big call, but we'd hope to have him back training next week," says Kidney.

        "There's no right time to get this done. We've a tour in June so it's better he's ready for that rather than have it snap."

        On Fitzgerald's mysterious injury, Kidney had nothing clear-cut to add to the ongoing confusion.

        "I don't know the exact medical term," he said, adding that he hoped that the player would train next week.

        NEW FOREIGN POLICY

        To even the most vaguely interested onlooker, it seems that the national coach's fingerprints are -- and indeed quite rightly should be -- all over the IRFU's clumsily delivered policy on the restriction of foreign players.

        Kidney, however, affected his most innocent of visages when asked his opinions on the subject, following Ireland's most successful ever Heineken Cup qualification phase.

        "I've been on both sides and it's a balancing act between policy makers, rules and regulations. Provinces will always want two or three players for each position. How you get there is a matter of policy. I've lost hair over the years -- you just deal with it.

        "I sit on one committee. Then lots I read through yourselves. I'm not going to go into things I'm asked about or not asked about. I've empathy in dealing with it."

        HEINEKEN FIZZ

        "The results have been fantastic. From Connacht's first win in a very important Heineken Cup game to the others qualifying for the knockout stages -- there's plenty there for Irish rugby," says Kidney.

        "It's a fantastic achievement. We must be getting few things right."

        With so many young players now joining the tried and trusted who ultimately disappointed at the World Cup, one suspects expectations will be heightened for Ireland's difficult opening fortnight.

        Kidney demurs. "Not really, I think it's brilliant. We've had years where lads come in after we just had one team qualified -- you can always spot the team who qualified and who didn't," he says.

        "Now we've three. They're probably emotionally drained this morning. It's brilliant to have them coming in like this. There's always pressure."

        That remains the case whether it is World Cup or Six Nations. And, having brushed aside all concerns yesterday, there are also no excuses for Ireland.

        "Being at home first puts a certain onus on you to hit the ground running," Kidney admits. "We have to do that."

        - David kelly

        Irish Independent
        Excellence is hard to keep quite - Sherrie Coale

        Comment


          #5
          O'Gara in bullish form after proving value to Irish cause
          By David Kelly

          Wednesday January 25 2012

          It would be trite to suggest that Ronan O'Gara is raging against the dying of the light. He isn't.

          For one thing, he will soon ring up his employers and start gently haranguing them for a contract extension beyond 2013.

          Secondly, he is no longer raging. Still seething quietly about Ireland's defeat to Wales in the World Cup, perhaps, but certainly not raging.

          "Contrary to what certain people think, that I'm difficult if I'm left out of the starting team, that's not true," smiles the man who, technically, still holds the Irish jersey after starting that game in Wellington.

          "I would like to think that if my team-mates came in here I'd be seen as the ultimate team man in terms of how I conduct myself. That is so important, that you have their respect, irrespective of what the public think.

          "What is important is the value you create for your team, the presence you carry in the squad, because I think that is so much more sometimes than playing ability. I've seen plenty of good players that when the going gets tough, they walk.

          "So you got to have that ability to hang in for each other, stick up for each other and fight for every single point.

          "I'm enjoying my rugby. What was important was that I needed to perform the way I did at the World Cup for my own piece of mind -- because I had put myself under so much pressure, because I felt that I had so much offer to Ireland.

          "Sometimes I was watching and I didn't think that I was given the opportunity. That's out of my hands.

          "But once I got the opportunity I felt that I had to get picked by Declan then, the way I was playing. So that was hugely satisfactory from a personal point of view.

          "I'm relaxed after the World Cup because of what had happened there. Essentially, I'd lost my place and I was doing everything possible to demonstrate that I had something to offer this team.

          "That's what matters. That my team knows that ROG can still do the business for us, whether he's starting or coming off the bench.

          "It was important for me to lay down a marker at the World Cup and that's the ultimate, so I think that gave me confidence."

          Regrets accompany reflection. Opportunity embraces the future.

          "I realise exactly where I am at the minute, 34 going on 35. There's a good No 10 there, there's two good No 10s there," he says.

          "So let's have a crack off this, let's see who gets picked. If I have the value to start the game, or come on in the game, that is hugely important to me.

          "At this stage, I can say I've a good record for Ireland. I enjoy playing for Ireland and it means so much to me.

          "I just want to ensure that we put ourselves in the best possible position to win a Grand Slam."

          - David Kelly

          Irish Independent
          Excellence is hard to keep quite - Sherrie Coale

          Comment


            #6
            The Irish Times - Wednesday, January 25, 2012

            O'Gara believes in playing part of the 'ultimate team man'
            GERRY THORNLEY in Limerick

            SIX NATIONS: NOW NEARER the end of his glittering, multi-decorated and hugely-prolific career than the beginning, Ronan O’Gara is not of a mind to set his or Ireland’s targets too low. He looks around his own squad, looks at their counterparts, and deduces that even with treks to London and Paris, a Grand Slam is achievable.

            “I think it is. There’s a fair bit of uncertainty in teams and you don’t know what teams will show up and how they’ll show up. Deccie (Kidney) has been stressing to us that ‘the only that will hold you back will be your attitude and your ambition going into this competition’. So I think that’s a good way of putting it. I think if you come really tuned in and everyone wanting to win it then you have a good chance. But if you kind of just show up and you’re happy to play for Ireland, then you could be in trouble.”

            Blissfully so in this day and age of carefully chosen words, while the articulate O’Gara may choose his after due consideration, he is not shy about expressing his true feelings. The onset of another Six Nations also finds O’Gara in good shape physically and more at ease with himself mentally after both the World Cup and Munster’s Heineken Cup campaign.

            “Essentially I’d lost my place and I was doing everything possible to demonstrate that I had something to offer this team. That’s what matters.

            “That my team knows that ‘Rog can still do the business for us, whether he’s starting or coming off the bench’. It was important for me to lay down a marker at the World Cup and that’s the ultimate so I think that gave me confidence.

            “I realise exactly where I am at the minute, 34 going on 35. There’s a good number 10 there, there’s two good number 10s there. So let’s have a crack off this, let’s see who gets picked. If I have value to start the game, or come on in the game, that is hugely important to me.”

            The number 10 selection is out of his control, but so be it. “Contrary to what certain people think that I’m difficult if I’m left out of the starting team, that’s not true. I would like to think that if my team-mates came in here I’d be seen as the ultimate team man in terms of how I conduct myself, that is so important, that you have their respect, irrespective of what the public think. What is important is the value you create for your team, the presence you carry in the squad.

            “I think that is so much more sometimes than playing ability because people who don’t take the field don’t understand essentially what is involved, you have so many mind games going on, so many games within games going on. I’ve seen plenty of good players who when the going gets tough, they walk. So you’ve got to have that ability to hang in for each other, stick up for each other and fight for every single point.”

            Now switched into “Irish mode”, he’s content to park the thought of a Munster-Ulster quarter-final, though he maintains Munster have neither been as bad as some people had made out before the rout of Northampton nor as good as some people were now making them out to be.

            As for perceptions of his own performance last Saturday, he said: “I looked good because our outer backs talked. My game is dependent on (Lifeimi) Mafi getting information from outside to in. I’ll boss the nine and the forwards but it makes me look good when 12 and 13 are chatting at me all the time.

            “When Dougie (Howlett) played, he was the best communicator I ever played with. He’s another person who thinks like I do and when you’ve two people like that it makes your job a whole lot easier.”

            Another in that category is Brian O’Driscoll, and a tad ominously, if understandably, O’Gara revealed that the great man’s “hugely strange” absence is already felt. “Even the first day at training today I was kind of looking to see where he was because it was a little bit mixed the session. Usually when he’s there the standards are really high but I suppose because Brian is the captain Paul (O’Connell) goes with the forwards and he doesn’t really see the backs and when he isn’t there somebody is going to have to take that role of the leader in the backs.

            “It’s an area we need to make sure standards are really high because I think it’s only when you take him out you realise how much of a presence he is and he’s a class operator, so of course he’ll be missed.”
            Excellence is hard to keep quite - Sherrie Coale

            Comment


              #7
              The Irish Times - Wednesday, January 25, 2012

              Kidney has one foot in Lions den
              GERRY THORNLEY, Rugby Correspondent, in Limerick

              RUGBY: AFTER ONE of the worst kept secrets doing the rugby rounds – even the dogs in O’Connell Street, and that’s any O’Connell Street, know the shortlist from which the next Lions’ head coach will be chosen – Declan Kidney yesterday somewhat reluctantly confirmed his name is in the mix.

              “I got a phone call about it, so I just said ‘yeah’,” admitted Kidney at the Irish squad’s base this week in Limerick’s Strand Hotel.

              “Anyone would be interested in going on the Lions but that’s it. I’m more interested in beating Wales in two weeks’ time. That’s the only thing I’m thinking about.”

              Given Warren Gatland and Scotland’s Andy Robinson are on that shortlist, it is an interesting little sub-plot to that Six Nations opener against Wales at the Aviva Stadium on Sunday week, and when asked if he had expressed a specific interest, Kidney repeated: “You don’t say no to something like that, but at the same time I’m not chasing it. I’m very happy where I am.”

              Kidney also confirmed Gert Smal, as reported in The Irish Times last week, would be remaining with Ireland as forwards coach.

              The Springboks’ World Cup-winning forwards coach of 2007 had been widely touted to succeed Pieter de Villiers as South African head coach, a position which SARU are due to fill on Friday.

              Confirming he had spoken to Smal, Kidney said: “Gert’s that type of man, you’d be speaking to him from the very start. No, Gert will be with us.

              “Gert’s contract goes to June 12 months, and he’ll be with us for at least the duration of that contract.”

              Newly installed Ireland manager Mick Kearney confirmed Leo Cullen flew to a specialist in Stockholm yesterday to have his Achilles tendons operated on.

              Cullen will thus be sidelined for “six to eight weeks” which leaves him in a race against time to lead Leinster against Cardiff in the Heineken Cup quarter-finals.

              The uncapped Munster number eight James Coughlan was promoted to the squad in his stead.

              Kidney confirmed he will be announcing a 30-man squad next Monday for the opening two matches, such is the swift turnaround for the games against Wales and France in Paris just six days later, and the likelihood is at least seven of the Wolfhounds’ squad to face the Saxons in Exeter this Saturday will be promoted ahead of the six additional young players who are part of this week’s training camp as well as Coughlan.

              As for Luke Fitzgerald and the “cricked neck” which has now sidelined him for four weeks, the Irish management are “hopeful” he will be able to resume training next week.

              Jonathan Sexton “did about 80 per cent of the session yesterday” and expects to be fully recovered from his ankle strain by the end of the week.

              This will be the first campaign without Brian O’Driscoll since the old Five Nations in 1999, and Kidney conceded: “You don’t lose one of the best players in the world and it not have an effect on and off pitch.”

              But while they would be remaining in contact, there were no plans for him to have a direct role.

              “He’s given everything to the team – and in future he’ll do so again. He knows someone has to come in and fill that 13 shirt, (and) sometimes by having him around that would make it harder.”

              Another significant change sees Les Kiss assume a bigger role by combining his duties as defensive coach with that of backs coach in tandem with kicking coach Mark Tainton and video analyst Mervyn Murphy.

              “I wouldn’t say we’re changing our style a great deal,” said Kiss. “To tell you the truth, 80-90 per cent of it will be the same. We just want to add a few more layers. We only have six sessions (before the Welsh game) and to create something grand and new would be wrong. There’s some subtle shifts, and we’ll work hard to get that right, but you’re talking about maybe adding 10 per cent to it.”

              For the first time, the entire squad have been part of successful Heineken Cup qualifying campaigns. Hailing the “fantastic results” of the provinces, including Connacht’s first win, Kidney deduced that Irish rugby “must be getting a few things right”.

              That said, he played a straight to bat to questions about the IRFU’s controversial new rulings regarding foreign players.

              “I’ve lost a bit of hair over the last 10 or 12 years dealing with different things, you just learn to deal with it.”

              Nor, Kidney maintained, would the provinces’ Euro campaigns heighten the pressure on Ireland to deliver in the Six Nations.

              “We’ve had years where lads would come in and we had one team qualified – and you could always spot the fellas in the team room who had qualified and those who didn’t.

              “Now we have three teams. I would say they were probably emotionally drained this morning. But as regards pressure, not at all. It’s brilliant to have them coming in like this. The pressure is there all the time, you just work away with that and to have them come in, in the frame of mind they’re in, is brilliant.”

              Nonetheless, expectation levels have been heightened and he did concede that “playing at home first puts a certain onus on you to hit the ground running”.
              Excellence is hard to keep quite - Sherrie Coale

              Comment


                #8
                A good weekend for Munster, Leinster and Ulster and they've created hype about our chances, sure if it was a world cup year we'd be winning that aswell.

                Feet should be firmly on the ground, the Welsh match will reveal all.
                "Majority rule only works if you're also considering individual rights. Because you can't have five wolves and one sheep voting on what to have for supper." - Larry Flynt

                Comment


                  #9
                  Thanks McCloud

                  Curious tone in the article by David Kelly in the Indo -- Leo Cullen chose to play for leinster instead of ireland and both are angry at Kidney; Luke Fitz may be feigning injury, why would he do that we are invited to ponder, if not as a snub to Kidney; Kidney has "lost" Paul McNaighton and Alan Gaffney after the RWC; Kidney is behind IRFU new policy on foreigners coming over here and taking Irish jobs.
                  Munster – Champions of Europe 2006, 2008, 2020.

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Originally posted by rathbaner View Post
                    Thanks McCloud

                    Curious tone in the article by David Kelly in the Indo -- Leo Cullen chose to play for leinster instead of ireland and both are angry at Kidney; Luke Fitz may be feigning injury, why would he do that we are invited to ponder, if not as a snub to Kidney; Kidney has "lost" Paul McNaighton and Alan Gaffney after the RWC; Kidney is behind IRFU new policy on foreigners coming over here and taking Irish jobs.
                    I presume they were a bit angry he mentioned Cullen's injury just before the HEC game.

                    Did we read the same article, It makes no mention of a player feigning injury or a snub, no one seems to know the story with Luke.

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Jeez that first Kelly article is brutal:
                      "One training session down, five to go before vengeance day"
                      "Warren Gatland and Kidney are neck and neck in the race to lead the Lions to Australia in June 2013 -- unless the committee once more plump for the anachronism that is Ian McGeechan, to whom so many dull people defer so obsequiously."
                      "Cullen chose to play through the pain barrier with club, rather than country"
                      "the national coach's fingerprints are ... all over the IRFU's clumsily delivered policy on the restriction of foreign players."
                      "the tried and trusted who ultimately disappointed at the World Cup"

                      Someone buy that man a copy of How To Make Friends And Influence People, quickly. I hate this gutter approach to rugby reporting, it's such a load of arse.
                      Tis but a scratch.

                      Comment


                        #12
                        Originally posted by bazzyg View Post
                        Did we read the same article, It makes no mention of a player feigning injury or a snub, no one seems to know the story with Luke.
                        "On Fitzgerald's mysterious injury, Kidney had nothing clear-cut to add to the ongoing confusion."



                        OK quick lesson in journalese. First law of daily newspaper writing: Space is very short so EVERY word counts. And not just every word but how that word is used and the context in which it sits can all lend extra meaning without taking up space. Every competent daily newspaper writer does this. This is why so many headlines use puns, cliches and bizarre juxtapositions, space is so tight and the words are so few you have to wring extra meaning out of everything.

                        The way the assertion of fact is structured. "On Fitzgerald's mysterious injury" means that it can be translated as follows:

                        Fitzgerald (or those close to him I'll leave you guessing about my sources) have let it be known that he is injured but (I wish to imply) there is no evidence or information about this injury.


                        ...Kidney had nothing clear-cut to add to the ongoing confusion."

                        (I want it to appear to the reader that) I asked the Irish coach directly and (I have phrased his response to leave open the possibility that) he doesn't know. Everyone wants to know what is really going on.


                        This piece is written in a daily newspaper and so is to be read in its specific context, this is to say the piece arrives on a stage that is already set.
                        In this case the context is this: Kidney dropped Fitz for the RWC. Since then Fitz has returned to form and was a contender for the Ireland squad. Kidney did not select him for the squad. Instead Fitz was picked for the B team. Fitz is now mysteriously injured and the coach doesn't even know why presumably because Fitz won't talk to him.
                        Munster – Champions of Europe 2006, 2008, 2020.

                        Comment


                          #13
                          Fitz hasn't played since the 26th December with neck strain and glutes problem. Leinster said recently they were taking it on "a game by game basis". If I can find out that in a couple of clicks why can't that journo
                          Marty in the Morning

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                            #14
                            Originally posted by LeakyBoots View Post
                            Fitz hasn't played since the 26th December with neck strain and glutes problem. Leinster said recently they were taking it on "a game by game basis". If I can find out that in a couple of clicks why can't that journo
                            Not part of his agenda I guess.

                            I don't know what the agenda is by the way, just trying to read between the lines. But at a guess I'd say it's anti-Kidney, pro Leinster - which may well be good for sales, I don't know.
                            One thing about the Indo is that the newspaper seems packed with opinionated bullies who have been given an national platform by Sir Tony.
                            It seems that every other year there's some young journo in an employment tribunal who was forced out because they couldn't deal with the treatment there.
                            It's a very similar culture London based dailies.
                            In London's national dailies, journalists feel that they wield real power over politicians and public figures and if they take a mind to go after someone they can cause real damage. I wonder if Kelly may be of that ilk. With the arrival of the UK based newspaper culture this has become more apparent in Ireland.

                            just my tuppence worth
                            Munster – Champions of Europe 2006, 2008, 2020.

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                              #15
                              Originally posted by rathbaner View Post
                              "On Fitzgerald's mysterious injury, Kidney had nothing clear-cut to add to the ongoing confusion."



                              OK quick lesson in journalese or Paranoia. First law of daily newspaper writing:
                              Not everything has to be read between the lines, thanks for the lesson all the same.

                              Schmidt has said very little of the injury also.

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