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    ’Old foes’ return to Bloody Sunday site



    'Old foes' return to Bloody Sunday site History will add an edge when Ireland host England at Croke Park, writes Brendan Gallagher
    <DIV =LeadPara>TIPPERARY'S popular half-back and captain, Michael 'Mick' Hogan, who had travelled to the Irish capital for an afternoon's sport to play in a friendly against Dublin, lay motionless on the greensward of Croke Park, blood oozing from his gunshot wounds, cut down by a British machine gun. So too Jane Boyle, dressed in her Sunday best, who had attended the match with her fiance and was to have got married five days later, and William Scott, a fanatical 14-year-old 'Dub' or Dublin supporter. </DIV>
    <DIV =TailParas>A couple of yards away lay 11-year-old William Robinson and 10-year-old Jerome O'Leary - good friends, Gaelic football fanatics and defenceless children who were bleeding to death after being gunned down by the so-called tough men of the Black and Tans. At one point during an afternoon of madness, the Tipperary and Dublin teams were lined up in the centre of Croke Park to be executed summarily by the British but mercifully a high-ranking, although unidentified, officer intervened and screamed that there had been enough killing on this awful day. November 21, 1920. Bloody Sunday. The first Bloody Sunday, that is. The second followed 52 years later in Derry. </DIV>
    <DIV =TailParas>In all, 14 Irish citizens were killed by British forces at Croke Park on Bloody Sunday and 80 badly wounded - including Hogan's Tipperary colleague Jim Egan - which goes a long way to explaining why the ground is so strongly identified with Irish nationalism. Part shrine, part cathedral, a living historical monument to the freedom fight. Hill 16 - the massive terrace that holds up to 15,000 fans - is built on the rubble of Sackville Street (renamed O'Connell Street when the British moved out) after the uprising of Easter 1916 had left the city centre in a state of some disrepair. The rubble was carted out to Croke Park, piled high and grassed over. </DIV>
    <DIV =TailParas>It is a mercifully rare, probably unique, occurrence for a sportsman to be shot dead by British troops on the field of play, so the story of Mick Hogan warrants re-telling. Indeed, just telling - it is doubtful if anybody this side of the Irish Sea without Irish antecedents has ever even heard it. Strangely, it was never included in history lessons in British schools. </DIV>
    <DIV =TailParas>Horan was born at Currasilla near Nine-Mile-House in Tipperary in 1896 into an old and much respected farming family. A talented sportsman who played for the Grangemockler GAA club, he rose quickly though the junior ranks to captain Tipperary, and like most able-bodied men in the area he joined the local volunteers to help in the underground fight to rid Ireland of the occupying British Army. Indeed, as a natural leader, he had been elected company commander of the Grangemockler Volunteers on the Friday night before the Tipperary team travelled up to Dublin by train the next day. </DIV>
    <DIV =TailParas>The Irish War of Independence (1919-21) had meant that all Gaelic sport had been banned by the occupying forces throughout 1920 but by the autumn a few inter-county matches had been allowed and Tipperary's game against Dublin - undoubtedly the two top sides of the era - had been organised hastily to raise funds for the families of those who had been imprisoned by the British. It was undeniably an overt political act during a period of extreme tension. While that does not excuse anything that followed, it does place the incident in context. </DIV>
    <DIV =TailParas>Bloody Sunday took place soon after the death of hunger striker Terence McSwiney and execution of Kevin Barry, and the Irish Republican Army were looking for revenge. Early on the morning of the match, in an operation planned by Mich
    Seas suas agus troid!

    #2


    Anthem will signal end of 'war'
    <DIV =LeadPara>MUHAMMAD ALI and U2 have performed there, so too the Chicago Bears and Robbie Williams, not to mention Ireland's leading Gaelic sports exponents for over a century, but until this weekend no rugby team, or indeed 'soccer' team, have even been allowed inside. </DIV>
    <DIV =LeadPara>It was only on April 16, 2005, that Gaelic Athletic Association (GAA) Rule 42 - which prohibits 'British' sports such as rugby and soccer from the stadium - was renounced by a 227-97 vote at the GAA annual conference. </DIV>
    <DIV =TailParas>History will be made on Sunday when rugby teams from Ireland and France run on to the pitch but the world will have positively turned on its axis on Feb 24 when the Irish Army Band belts out God Save The Queen at the site where British soldiers shot dead 14 Irish citizens in 1920. </DIV>
    <DIV =TailParas>Rugby has to take a lot of credit for this extraordinary turnaround, with the Ireland team having been a source of enormous national pride over the last five or six years. Eddie O'Sullivan's side have risen to third in the world rankings, won two Triple Crowns and played with flair and excitement rarely seen in Irish rugby before. </DIV>
    <DIV =TailParas>The prospect of Ireland going eyeballs out for the Six Nations Championship - who knows, maybe even defeating England in the process on Feb 24 - in front of a wildly patriotic 82,300-capacity Croke Park, has grown rapidly in appeal, even in diehard GAA circles. It would be both the ultimate celebration of 'Irishness' and also a timely indicator that past injustice and carnage can eventually be forgiven. </DIV>
    <DIV =TailParas>So when it became obvious that Lansdowne Road needed to be rebuilt, the Irish Rugby Football Union approached the GAA about a temporary switch to Croke Park. </DIV>
    <DIV =TailParas>"I never believed for one moment I would see it in my lifetime,'' says former Ireland fly-half Tony Ward. </DIV>
    <DIV =TailParas>"I was talking to one of the long-serving groundsmen at Croke Park last week and he said the moment the band strike up God Save The Queen before the England match will be the moment the 'war' is officially over. The move to Croke Park is full of symbolism and shows a young country maturing in front of our eyes. </DIV>
    <DIV =TailParas>"And of course it will be a sensational venue.'' </DIV>
    <DIV =TailParas>(c) 2007 Telegraph Group Limited, London </DIV>


    Seas suas agus troid!

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      #3
      Peace in our time.
      Munster – Champions of Europe 2006, 2008, 2019.

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        #4



        @@@@SPAN lang="EN-US">an email i received this morning [img]smileys/shock.gif[/img]
        @@@@/SPAN>


        @@@@SPAN lang="EN-US">@@@@/SPAN>"Some guy worte this into the English Times today. Surprised they published it.

        Scotland weren't much better than a Guinness Premiership or Magners League team, but you can only beat what is put in front of you, and Saturday represents a very good start. Ireland may well be missing Brian O'Driscoll as well as Shane Horgan and don't have the resources in depth to overcome such losses. However neither will England have the armoured cars and machine guns they had the last time they entered Croke Park! -Frank Schnittger, Wicklow, Ireland "


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          #5
          Originally posted by beir bua


          @@@@SPAN lang=EN-US>an email i received this morning [img]smileys/shock.gif[/img]
          @@@@/SPAN>



          @@@@SPAN lang=EN-US>@@@@/SPAN>


          "Some guy worte this into the English Times today. Surprised they published it.

          Scotland weren't much better than a Guinness Premiership or Magners League team, but you can only beat what is put in front of you, and Saturday represents a very good start. Ireland may well be missing Brian O'Driscoll as well as Shane Horgan and don't have the resources in depth to overcome such losses. However neither will England have the armoured cars and machine guns they had the last time they entered Croke Park! -Frank Schnittger, Wicklow, Ireland "

          It was on their website yesterday but was removed after about 10 minutes. Don't think it was published in hard copy though
          http://www.rebelwaves.com

          Comment


            #6


            Im glad to see the opening posts above.


            State the history because its true, it happened and people should know about it. I guarantee there are a lot of irish that dont know that history not to mention other nationalities.


            Having stated the history get on with the matchs and beat France and England in CP on the way to a Grand Slam. Enjoy it all and move on, never forgetting the history because it happened.


            Its the likes of Mr Schnittger thatundermines everything that has been achieved in this young country. We are now beyond that sh.t.
            Anybody who sees a psychiatrist would want their head examined.*&nb sp;Henry Ford

            Comment


              #7


              the first article fails to mention that England were the only team to come and play us back in the bad old days in 1973, their appearance was applauded as a brave and generous act in the face of the tense atmosphere in Ireland at the time. The 1972 Five Nations was incomplete because the Welsh and Scottish refused to travel to Dublin to play, following Bloody Sunday at the start of the tournament.


              Frank the Tank is not coming back. OK? That part of me is over, water under the bridge.

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                #8


                in fairness harry the article seems to be just about bloody sunday 1920,


                the only mention of the other one is for the "unknowing" to be able to differenciate between the two

                Comment


                  #9
                  that's true, it's a pretty passionate article alright. The whole country is going to be up for this match. I wish I had a ticket for it.
                  Frank the Tank is not coming back. OK? That part of me is over, water under the bridge.

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                    #10
                    Emm, I thought the English didn't have armored cars in Croker, I was under the impression that was one of the many 'Michael Collins' exaggerations/myths.
                    Kiva - Loans That Change Lives

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                      #11

                      Originally posted by daveirl
                      Emm, I thought the English didn't have armored cars in Croker, I was under the impression that was one of the many 'Michael Collins' exaggerations/myths.
                      Read it again. Slower this time. [img]smileys/wink.gif[/img][img]smileys/biggrin.gif[/img]
                      Grandpa Simpson: The last time the meteors came, we thought the sky was on fire. Naturally, we blamed the Irish. We hanged more \'n a few.

                      Comment


                        #12


                        Originally posted by Chief
                        Originally posted by daveirl
                        Emm, I thought the English didn't have armored cars in Croker, I was under the impression that was one of the many 'Michael Collins' exaggerations/myths.
                        Read it again. Slower this time. [img]smileys/wink.gif[/img][img]smileys/biggrin.gif[/img]

                        Chief, I think Daveir is referring to the armoured cars mentioned by Mr Schnittger's letter to the times.
                        Anybody who sees a psychiatrist would want their head examined.*&nb sp;Henry Ford

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                          #13
                          Didn't France also organise something with us to make up for the lost revenue due to our Celtic Brethren abandoning us?
                          Shameless self promotion time ladies and gents!
                          Munster: Early Season
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                            #14


                            Originally posted by Cathal
                            Didn't France also organise something with us to make up for the lost revenue due to our Celtic Brethren abandoning us?

                            Yep - they played a meaningless friendly against us later that season, fair play to them.


                            New infraction avoidance policy: a post may be described as imbecilic, but its author should never be described as an imbecile.

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                              #15
                              Is yer man one of the Schnittgers of Grangemokler or wha?
                              Hello friends in Brussels. Baldy here

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