Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Croke Park Pitch dimensions

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    Croke Park Pitch dimensions



    True Gaels may feel a bit removed from rugby action.
    <DIV =LeadPara>Croke Park Pitch dimensions: Regular patrons of Croke Park who attend next Sunday's historic first rugby international at GAA headquarters will find themselves noticeably farther from the action than usual. </DIV>
    <DIV =LeadPara>The Gaelic games pitch at the venue measures 144 metres long and 86 metres wide, which significantly exceeds the dimensions of rugby (100 x 70) and soccer (104 x 69 - these measurements can be adjusted within a certain tolerance by the home manager, but a decision on that won't be made until nearer the Wales soccer international). </DIV>
    <DIV =TailParas>This means that at the Ireland-France international the crowd at either end of the ground on the Hill 16 terrace or in the Davin Stand will be over 20 metres more distant from the goalposts than they would have been last Saturday night at the Dublin-Tyrone NFL fixture. </DIV>
    <DIV =TailParas>Although there is this extra distance behind the goals, the in-goal area is just 10 metres from either set of goalposts with another 10 metres between the crowd and the dead-ball line. </DIV>
    <DIV =TailParas>Stadium director Peter McKenna says that the distances involved - there will be an additional eight metres on either side of the field as well - won't significantly affect the spectator's sight lines or player perspectives. </DIV>
    <DIV =TailParas>"There won't, for instance, be anything like the visual distortion you get at the big Australian grounds where the pitch is being floated on an oval field usually used for cricket or Australian Rules. We're simply placing rectangular fields inside a bigger one. There are no issues involved on the basis of crowd distance from pitch. </DIV>
    <DIV =TailParas>"There is greater distance in some of the bigger grounds in Europe, where the elevation of the stands is so great that, for spectators looking down, the pitch is a considerable distance back. This will apply to a lesser extent even in the proposed Lansdowne Road redesign. </DIV>
    <DIV =TailParas>"And although the nearer set of goalposts is 20 metres more distant, the farther posts are 20 metres closer than in a football or hurling match." </DIV>
    <DIV =TailParas>Pitch-side advertising will also be moved in to an appropriate distance from the new sidelines and will frame the playing area as it would in any other stadium. </DIV>
    <DIV =TailParas>One issue that will vary is the type of seat from which views will be blocked. </DIV>
    <DIV =TailParas>"There's more seat kills (seats that can't be used) in soccer because of advertising and team dugouts, which give it a different kind of configuration." </DIV>
    <DIV =TailParas>(c) 2007, The Irish Times. </DIV>
    <DIV =TailParas>Irish Times</DIV>
    Seas suas agus troid!

    #2


    Onus on me to be at Croker, says Brennan
    <DIV =LeadPara>GAA President Nickey Brennan accepts that his attendance at Sunday’s historic Six Nations clash at Croke Park will offend elements in their membership who remain totally opposed to the opening up of the stadium for rugby and soccer. </DIV>
    <DIV =LeadPara>However, Mr Brennan says he has a responsibility as president to be there on the day and to represent the Association, ‘albeit in a background role’. The GAA president and Director-General Liam Mulvihill will be guests of the IRFU at the game anyway. </DIV>
    <DIV =TailParas>"I’m quite sure my presence there will generate some interest, but I have a feeling that once the first game or two is out of the way the hype will down a bit. The historical aspect of it cannot be lost on anybody and it’s certainly not lost on me. </DIV>
    <DIV =TailParas>"From my own personal point of view, it’s a very significant issue to be around at this particular time. I’d be telling a lie if I did not say that. There’s an element of excitement and dare I say, a responsibility on my shoulders as well." </DIV>
    <DIV =TailParas>He acknowledged that the whole question of rugby and soccer being played in Croke Park remained ‘very sensitive’ for a lot of their members. "I know that, and it will continue to be a sensitive issue until the last game is played here, whenever that is," he stated. </DIV>
    <DIV =TailParas>"I’m also conscious of the fact that the Association made a decision and we have to get on with that. And, while sensitive to the needs of both sides, I have to be conscious that this is an event that’s going to take place in the glare of a major media spotlight. It’s happening on my watch and I have to stand up and present the Association in the best way forward and hopefully I’m doing that." </DIV>
    <DIV =TailParas>He explained that, apart from the fact that he will be occupying a seat in the front row (of the VIP area) on Sunday, he will have no other role. </DIV>
    <DIV =TailParas>Liam Mulvihill agreed that it was an unusual situation to be ‘guests’ in their own stadium, but that he had absolutely no difficulty with that. "We are not looking for any other role. That would be unfair to the people who are in charge on this occasion,’’ he commented. </DIV>
    <DIV =TailParas>"The IRFU are well used to having been in a similar situation in Lansdowne Road for many years. We have had no problems in sorting out where we are expected to be and what we are expected to be on this occasion.’’ </DIV>
    <DIV =TailParas>For the president, what will be ‘most significant’ on Sunday will be the numbers of people coming to Croker for the first time. "They will know of Croke Park and have some idea of the history of it but for all sorts of reasons would never have been here before. They’re going to be impressed. Then, we will have French visitors who probably would not have heard of Croke Park before this week and probably would not know much about the history. </DIV>
    <DIV =TailParas>"They’re going to ask, ‘where did this come out of,’ they will be impressed that an amateur organisation went to such major steps to develop this facility for our own use. I think that when they understand our Association — and why we need to remain amateur and why we depend so much on the volunteer effort — they will have some appreciation of how were able to develop a facility like this. Simply because those two strands ‘of what we are’ are so important. </DIV>
    <DIV =TailParas>"I will be very proud on Sunday, and I’m sure there are going to be people who will be gobsmacked. With the advent of the lights, it has added a completely new dimension to Croke Park. </DIV>
    <DIV =TailParas>And, no matter what
    Seas suas agus troid!

    Comment


      #3


      That isn't quite the case with the rugby dimensions





      Comment


        #4


        So if they made the In-Goal area as long as they could, like they seemed to have done in Murrayfield, then the length of the pitch would be similar to the GAA dimensions?

        Comment


          #5
          Correct. Even with the minimum in goal area, then you have 120m, with a max of 144m

          Comment


            #6
            Seems like an extremely wide tolerance. And not an insignificant one. 12 metres extra for a rolling ball. Makes a long kick-and-chase a bit more attractive.

            Comment


              #7


              Originally posted by davisc
              Seems like an extremely wide tolerance. And not an insignificant one. 12 metres extra for a rolling ball. Makes a long kick-and-chase a bit more attractive.

              But that's the maximum. By the sound of it, they've gone for a much smaller in goal area.

              Comment


                #8
                I hope Sean Kelly is also in the front row of the VIP section. He deserves it.

                Comment


                  #9


                  Glad to see that others are coming round to my point of view [img]smileys/biggrin.gif[/img]


                  I've always felt that those complaining about the dimensions of GAA pitches being so huge that rugby spectators would have trouble seeing were vastly overstateing the case for ulterior motives.


                  Seeing the pitch diagram again makes me wonder about some the the Soccer groundshare arrangements in the GP though - I'm sure some of their in-goal areas are less than 10m[img]smileys/c&#111;nfused.gif[/img]

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Originally posted by pwrmoore


                    Glad to see that others are coming round to my point of view [img]smileys/biggrin.gif[/img]


                    I've always felt that those complaining about the dimensions of GAA pitches being so huge that rugby spectators would have trouble seeing were vastly overstateing the case for ulterior motives.


                    Seeing the pitch diagram again makes me wonder about some the the Soccer groundshare arrangements in the GP though - I'm sure some of their in-goal areas are less than 10m[img]smileys/c&#111;nfused.gif[/img]





                    That's exactly what I was thinking. Are there different tolerances for domestic games? Or have special arrangements been made? Maybe they are 10 metres and they look so small because we're used to seeing larger in-goal areas.

                    Comment


                      #11


                      Preparing the groundwork
                      <DIV =LeadPara>FOUR years after he took up his post in Dublin 3, Robert Ellis still has Yorkshire in his voice. </DIV>
                      <DIV =LeadPara>The rangy groundsman has a busy week ahead of him — the little matter of history being made and all that — but he still has time to outline the nuts and bolts of changing the face of Croke Park. </DIV>
                      <DIV =TailParas>"Preparing for an ordinary GAA game is quite easy, because obviously you’re already set up for that. For rugby the posts are different, so the GAA posts have to come down, and the rugby field’s a lot shorter as well. That and the posts are the obvious differences, but the turf itself, is left much the same as it would be for a Gaelic football game. The hurling’s slightly different because they like the grass a little shorter for that, but rugby isn’t a whole lot different to the football." </DIV>
                      <DIV =TailParas>However, sixteen men of eighteen stone each don’t tend to scrummage in a Gaelic football match — not normally, anyway. Those nervous about seeing divots the size of tabletops can relax, however: Ellis is confident the pitch can take it. </DIV>
                      <DIV =TailParas>"There’ll be no major structural damage to the pitch because it’s got the plastic fibres to reinforce it. </DIV>
                      <DIV =TailParas>It won’t be like the Millennium Stadium, where you see huge chunks torn out of the ground. You’re going to have damage, because obviously rugby’s a very hard game, and no matter where it’s played it’ll damage a pitch. But there won’t be any more damage than what we’d have to deal with after two games on a Sunday afternoon. </DIV>
                      <DIV =TailParas>"We have a similar pitch to those in the new Arsenal stadium, Spurs’ ground, West Ham, Liverpool — but also to the pitches at Reading, Wycombe and Watford, which all have both rugby and soccer played on them, so that’s encouraging." </DIV>
                      <DIV =TailParas>The Croker pitch is 86 metres wide and 144 metres long, while a rugby field is 100 metres post to post, plus a ten-metre in-goal area behind those. At only 70 metres wide, there’s a considerable difference in the alignment of the playing areas, but the dimensions of a GAA pitch mean Ellis has plenty of room to play around with. For instance, anyone expecting to lean over and slap the hooker on the back at line-out time is in for a surprise. </DIV>
                      <DIV =TailParas>"The posts will be just in front of the 20-metre line," says Ellis. "There’s 104 metres between those, so the rugby goal will be just in front of the two lines, not on them. There isn’t a line from the GAA pitch that we’ll retain. </DIV>
                      <DIV =TailParas>"The sideline will come in eight metres from where it is for GAA games, for one thing. That’s eleven metres to the carpet (the orange perimeter in front of the seating area) and then another two metres to the actual front row. It’s around 14, 15 metres from the spectator to the sideline – I’d compare it to the European stadia with their running tracks around the playing area. </DIV>
                      <DIV =TailParas>"It’s not going to be like Lansdowne Road, where you have people right on top of the player taking the line-out, for instance. You’re going to be a lot further away from the play." </DIV>
                      <DIV =TailParas>Some things should make Brian O’Driscoll (if he’s playing) and company at home. </DIV>
                      <DIV =TailParas>There may be a familiar look to the target Ronan O’Gara aims at. </DIV>
                      <DIV =TailParas>"Lansdowne Road had a spare set of goalposts, so we’re getting those," says Ellis. "They’re not the posts that were used there for the autumn internationals. They’re narrower than our posts and they’re slightly taller. </DIV>
                      <DIV =TailParas>"Last October holes
                      Seas suas agus troid!

                      Comment


                        #12


                        A whole new ball game
                        <DIV =LeadPara>THE devil is in the detail. Ask Croke Park operations manager Alan Gallagher. Just as staff in Jones Road put one little issue to bed, another pops up. </DIV>
                        <DIV =LeadPara>"At today’s meeting the flags were brought up," says Gallagher. </DIV>
                        <DIV =TailParas>"Someone pointed out that the GAA flag flying in the stadium is six foot by three foot, and the other flags are all smaller. So we’re going to have to get flags that are all the same size." </DIV>
                        <DIV =TailParas>Gallagher is having a long week, as are event controller Seamas Ó Midheach and chief steward John Leonard. The oddest events have a knock-on effect as the countdown to the Six Nations continues – the threat of sleet isn’t that ominous when you have undersoil heating, but it means the company detailed to paint the RBS Six Nations logo on the Croke Park pitch has to hold off until Saturday. </DIV>
                        <DIV =TailParas>Also, the avian flu outbreak in Britain is being taken very seriously in Croke Park, and the gardaí won’t have a sense of humour if any French fans try to smuggle in cockerels. </DIV>
                        <DIV =TailParas>After all that there’s the crowd itself. You can expect a fairly blue tinge to the Hill, even if the jerseys are more Le Coq Sportif than Arnotts. </DIV>
                        <DIV =TailParas>"A lot of the French are on the Hill," says John Leonard. </DIV>
                        <DIV =TailParas>"There’s a fair few in the Lower Cusack as well, and then you’ll have the people who get tickets here and there scattered around the stadium. </DIV>
                        <DIV =TailParas>"It’s going to be different insofar as a lot of people won’t know the area. </DIV>
                        <DIV =TailParas>A certain percentage aren’t going to know where to go, as distinct from when Cork GAA fans come up, say. They’re coming up here all the time, so they know where to go if they’re in the Hogan or the Cusack." </DIV>
                        <DIV =TailParas>The stewards are completely voluntary, and on average they work 22 fixtures a year. Leonard, a native of Caltra in Galway, has been a steward since 1965 and took over as chief steward in 1984. Last night he had some welcome visitors, when a dozen senior Lansdowne Road stewards called to Croke Park to chat about Sunday. </DIV>
                        <DIV =TailParas>"They’re used to dealing with rugby, obviously," says Leonard, "But they’ll be paired with our supervisory stewards, so they’ll meet each other so they’ll know who they’re paired with on Sunday. </DIV>
                        <DIV =TailParas>"We’re not preparing French phrases, not officially anyway! A few of our stewards would have French, but inspecting the tickets is the key, that’ll be fairly self-explanatory." </DIV>
                        <DIV =TailParas>Leonard is looking forward to the game. </DIV>
                        <DIV =TailParas>"I never thought I’d see foreign sports, as we used to call them, in Croke Park, but I have to say the rapport we have with the IRFU and FAI stewards has been terrific. A lot of them were here last Saturday night for Dublin-Tyrone, working with us, but they were also around for the latter stages of last year’s championship and the Compromise Rules series last October. </DIV>
                        <DIV =TailParas>"That meant they were able to ask their questions on the ground, which was very handy. There’s a good bond there with them, and I’m looking forward to working with them." </DIV>
                        <DIV =TailParas>The stewards start work at 12.40 on Sunday and the stiles open at 1pm. GAA aficionados will notice one crucial difference to the big summer occasions. </DIV>
                        <DIV =TailParas>"The fact that there’s no minor match, as you’d put in GAA terms, may affect the crowd," says Leonard. "From that point of view you’d be expecting
                        Seas suas agus troid!

                        Comment


                          #13


                          Originally posted by Point
                          I hope Sean Kelly is also in the front row of the VIP section. He deserves it.
                          [img]smileys/shock.gif[/img]Shock and horror. Point said something vaguely positive about the GAA or one of it's members [img]smileys/shock.gif[/img]....................[img]smileys/wink.gif[/img]


                          BTW I agree with you on this one. He de man.

                          Comment

                          Working...
                          X