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    English RFU Worlds wealthiest union

    Rugby Football Union tops £150 million revenue mark for first time, confirming their status as the world's wealthiest union
    Governing body, helped by money from QBE Autumn series, on course to be debt free when the World Cup starts two years from now, in 2015


    The Rugby Football Union has underpinned its status as the world’s wealthiest union by posting record returns, with revenue for their last financial year topping £150million for the first time in the governing body’s history.
    The RFU’s annual reports and accounts reveal that total revenue jumped from £110.6million in 2011/12 to £153.5million, a rise of £42.9million for their business year ending on June 30.
    Telegraph Sport revealed on Monday that the RFU was in line for a record pay day when England face New Zealand at Twickenham on Saturday as part of a financial upturn that will lead to the governing body being completely debt free when it hosts the Rugby World Cup in 2015.
    The RFU returns also reveal that also made a record investment in rugby, up 15 per cent on last year to just under £64 million including an additional £3.5million to the grassroots game.
    The retained profit for the year was £3.8million, boosting the RFU’s profit and loss reserve to £20million.


    The latest figures, published on Friday, dwarf those of the other leading unions in the world game.
    New Zealand Rugby Football Union, even given the financial benefits accruing from All Blacks winning the 2011 World Cup, recorded total revenue of approximately £54 million in their last financial year.


    The Welsh Rugby Union took in £61million in revenue, with the figures for unions in South Africa, Australia and Ireland standing at close to £42million, £55.7million and £54 million respectively.


    The massive increase in total revenue can partly be explained by the full match programme last season, which saw Twickenham host four internationals last autumn and three Six Nations matches.
    But there were also major increases in sponsorship, hospitality and catering as well as increased attendances at other matches, additional concerts and non-match day events.
    “This was an outstanding year in which continued growth allowed us to make record investment directly with clubs and in operating the English game at all levels,” said Ian Ritchie, the RFU’s chief executive.
    “ We have made significant strides across the board allowing us to invest an additional £3.5m in grassroots rugby, largely thanks to a busy calendar of Twickenham events.
    “Our unsecured loan granted by new banking partner RBS is allowing us to upgrade Twickenham Stadium in readiness for our hosting of the Rugby World Cup in 2015 and there is much to look forward to throughout the game.”
    The financial reports shows that Twickenham generated an increase in hospitality and catering of £9.9 million from £26.6 to £37.5, while sponsorship revenue was up by £3.8million from £15.3million to £19.1million.
    Ticket revenue alone increased by £20.6million from £13.3million to £33.9million for hosting the autumn games against Fiji, Australia, South Africa and New Zealand and the Six Nations games against Scotland, France and Italy.
    RFU chief financial officer Stephen Brown said: “We have successfully concluded the first year of our Strategic Plan and look forward to achieving our objectives through sustained and growing investment in rugby up to and beyond the Rugby World Cup in 2015.
    “The retained profit for the year of £3.8m was achieved after delivering significant growth in rugby investment.
    "The RFU’s profit and loss reserve now stands at a very healthy £20m which, together with strong financial projections, enable us to comfortably accommodate the fluctuations of the four-year Rugby World Cup match cycle whilst maintaining investment in all levels of the game.”

    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/sport/rug...est-union.html
    Cé go bhfuil an namhaid trampled underfoot mo thír, fhios ag an teanga d'aois na Breataine Bige aon Retreat. Evan James 1856

    #2
    While they lose more players every year and see clubs going to the wall. English rugby folk are always quick to point out that they're the biggest union, but it ignores the trajectory. Grass roots rugby in England isn't in great health.
    "We will not walk in fear, one of another. We will not be driven into an age of unreason if we dig deep into our history and remember we are not descended from fearful men" Edward R Murrow

    "Little by little, we have been brought into the present condition in which we are able neither to tolerate the evils from which we suffer, nor the remedies we need to cure them." - Livy


    "I think that progress has been made by two flames that have always been burning in the human heart. The flame of anger against injustice and the flame of hope that you can build a better world" - Tony Benn

    Comment


      #3
      Originally posted by Balla Boy View Post
      While they lose more players every year and see clubs going to the wall. English rugby folk are always quick to point out that they're the biggest union, but it ignores the trajectory. Grass roots rugby in England isn't in great health.
      Its very similar to here really. Built around a network of private schools.
      I always knew Madigan was a closet Scrum Half. Ignore All things that suggest Continuity.

      Comment


        #4
        Originally posted by The Outlaw View Post
        Its very similar to here really. Built around a network of private schools.
        The top schoolboy teams are, but club rugby has always been a big thing here. There is, or at least was, a rugby club in just about every town south of the wash, and most of them north of it.

        Surrey alone has two divisions, as well as clubs playing in the London and National leagues.

        They're just not in great health. All those lads cheering Jonny in 2003 didn't get as far as lacing up a pair of boots. General conclusion here now is that the RFU were completely ill prepared to capitalise on that success. A record number of clubs ceased to be that year.
        "We will not walk in fear, one of another. We will not be driven into an age of unreason if we dig deep into our history and remember we are not descended from fearful men" Edward R Murrow

        "Little by little, we have been brought into the present condition in which we are able neither to tolerate the evils from which we suffer, nor the remedies we need to cure them." - Livy


        "I think that progress has been made by two flames that have always been burning in the human heart. The flame of anger against injustice and the flame of hope that you can build a better world" - Tony Benn

        Comment


          #5
          Originally posted by Balla Boy View Post
          The top schoolboy teams are, but club rugby has always been a big thing here. There is, or at least was, a rugby club in just about every town south of the wash, and most of them north of it.

          Surrey alone has two divisions, as well as clubs playing in the London and National leagues.

          They're just not in great health. All those lads cheering Jonny in 2003 didn't get as far as lacing up a pair of boots. General conclusion here now is that the RFU were completely ill prepared to capitalise on that success. A record number of clubs ceased to be that year.
          On that, Balla, would the top Irish Rugby schools offer scholarships in the way the English schools do?

          Comment


            #6
            Originally posted by the plastic paddy View Post
            On that, Balla, would the top Irish Rugby schools offer scholarships in the way the English schools do?
            No idea really. I'd imagine not, or Earls wouldn't have been at Nessans!

            The top English public schools actively headhunt promising players and offer them scholarships. Then lots of bankers roll up at open days, are shown the stats for England schoolboy reps and the trophy cabinet, and fork out £50k plus a year in the hope that little Billy will play at Twickenham.

            I spoke to one outraged city gent whose son played fly half for his year at Marlborough. He was hundreds of thousands out of pocket by the fifth year when his son got bumped for a budding England schoolboy on a scholarship.

            The sense of crushed entitlement was palpable.
            "We will not walk in fear, one of another. We will not be driven into an age of unreason if we dig deep into our history and remember we are not descended from fearful men" Edward R Murrow

            "Little by little, we have been brought into the present condition in which we are able neither to tolerate the evils from which we suffer, nor the remedies we need to cure them." - Livy


            "I think that progress has been made by two flames that have always been burning in the human heart. The flame of anger against injustice and the flame of hope that you can build a better world" - Tony Benn

            Comment


              #7
              IMO the £150m + turnover figure is what the English pro clubs want a larger slice, their view is they supply the players and to a lesser extent the supporters, this entitles them to a greater share with little or no responsibility to the amateur game, these clubs want more and more/control from their masters of old.

              Comment


                #8
                Originally posted by the plastic paddy View Post
                On that, Balla, would the top Irish Rugby schools offer scholarships in the way the English schools do?
                CBC Cork have been giving out Rugby scholarships for years (Donncha O'Callaghan and David Corkery benefitted IIRC), PBC always used to slag them about it, but I don't know if they do the same now or not.

                Comment


                  #9
                  Originally posted by Stanley View Post
                  IMO the £150m + turnover figure is what the English pro clubs want a larger slice, their view is they supply the players and to a lesser extent the supporters, this entitles them to a greater share with little or no responsibility to the amateur game, these clubs want more and more/control from their masters of old.

                  Not much point in wanting a cut of turnover, though. They're only showing three and a bit mill on that £150. Lots of that turnover number is the subs coming up from Nether Wallop RFU, and it's going back down in RDO salaries, funding matching for infrastructure etc.

                  The English game, from my perspective, remains an overwhelmingly amateur sport. The pro game is a really thin veneer at the top of it.
                  "We will not walk in fear, one of another. We will not be driven into an age of unreason if we dig deep into our history and remember we are not descended from fearful men" Edward R Murrow

                  "Little by little, we have been brought into the present condition in which we are able neither to tolerate the evils from which we suffer, nor the remedies we need to cure them." - Livy


                  "I think that progress has been made by two flames that have always been burning in the human heart. The flame of anger against injustice and the flame of hope that you can build a better world" - Tony Benn

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Originally posted by Balla Boy View Post
                    No idea really. I'd imagine not, or Earls wouldn't have been at Nessans!
                    he was poached, eventually.

                    Comment


                      #11
                      With the RFU having revenue reserves of about £20 million how do the Telegraph come to the conclusion that the RFU are the world's wealthiest union?

                      The IRFU has just short of €60 million in Union funds.

                      Comment


                        #12
                        Originally posted by Balla Boy View Post
                        Not much point in wanting a cut of turnover, though. They're only showing three and a bit mill on that £150. Lots of that turnover number is the subs coming up from Nether Wallop RFU, and it's going back down in RDO salaries, funding matching for infrastructure etc.

                        The English game, from my perspective, remains an overwhelmingly amateur sport. The pro game is a really thin veneer at the top of it.
                        My thoughts would be that PRL would really quite like the subs from Nether Wallop going into their back pockets rather than to the RDO's to continue spreading the game though. The PRL would really quite like to 'administer' rugby at all levels as well whilst allowing the RFU to collect the corn for them. This is why I cannot really get my head around the RFU's complete complicity with PRL.

                        Comment


                          #13
                          Interesting thread, I will do some digging around my local club and see what I can find out about their give and take with the RFU.

                          Comment


                            #14
                            Originally posted by Red Hand Hero View Post
                            My thoughts would be that PRL would really quite like the subs from Nether Wallop going into their back pockets rather than to the RDO's to continue spreading the game though. The PRL would really quite like to 'administer' rugby at all levels as well whilst allowing the RFU to collect the corn for them. This is why I cannot really get my head around the RFU's complete complicity with PRL.

                            As Beckenham Wasp said a few weeks ago, here the Upper echelons of the RFU are populated with "Premier League" people such as Rob Andrews,
                            Originally posted by Beckenham Wasp View Post

                            As I have said before now that the malign influence of Martyn Thomas has been removed and the "Old Farts" have been marginalised the RFU and Premier Rugby are on very good terms with each other. That is what Rob Andrew's job is. Managing the relationship between the RFU and Premier Rugby. He is from a club background having run Newcastle single handedly for 10 years. He has recruited people with Premier Rugby backgrounds en mass into the RFU administration. Stuart Lancaster and all his coaches are from Premier Rugby backgrounds with Lancaster having been the driving force behind the creation of the RFU Regional academies and the revolution in player development at age group level.

                            The reason why the RFU has been so quiet in all this is because they would have been briefed and would have had a very clear view is of things from the beginning. Ian Ritchie is no fool and whatever people say on this board the people who run Premier Rugby are no fools either. There is nothing to be gained from the RFU and Premier Rugby falling out with each other.

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