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  1. #1
    Leader of the Red Hordes NiallGK's Avatar
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    Packet and Tripe

    Right, just to join in on a culinary theme (or detract from it even). Packet and Tripe.

    Anyone eat it, like it, detest it, have recipes for same, or any other philosophical cogitations.


    I used to love the stuff, cooked with milk and onions. Ask a butcher for that in Dublin and they'll immediately assume a glazed look.

    (EDITED)
    Last edited by NiallGK; 20th-January-2012 at 18:37.
    Tommy O'Donnell - David Wallace Mk. 2.

  2. #2
    Detest it. We used to have to walk to the butcher to pick up free tripe for the dogs, and walk back with this heavy bag/sack of the stinking stuff for about two miles each way. Walking that distance wasn't of itself an issue at all, but all the return trips felt three times as long! It wasn't even cold-stored all the time, but when it was it stank out the fridge. Needless to say, I will never eat it.
    "A victory for ruthless over rootless."

    - cornerboy on Munster's victory over Saracens in Thomond Park, October 2014:

  3. #3
    Munster Praetorian Guard
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    I've always known it as packet and tripe.

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  5. #4
    Leader of the Red Hordes NiallGK's Avatar
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    Egads, you are correct sir.
    Last edited by NiallGK; 20th-January-2012 at 01:58.
    Tommy O'Donnell - David Wallace Mk. 2.

  6. #5
    Reader of the Hed Lordes No. 16's Avatar
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    Used to get it in the local years ago when it was put on for the patrons for big rugby matches. It was a well executed dish served with a big wedge of bread an butter. But in recent years the publican switched to beef stew for the apres match feed. I and i think many other welcomed the change. Given the choice....well what would you choose....

  7. #6
    Vile stuff. I remember my Nan cooking it, and I'd gawk at the first whiff of it.

    Interresting article by Jim Kemmy about it ...

    http://www.limerickcity.ie/media/treacy's%20packet%20and%20tripe.pdf

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  9. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by fitzy73 View Post
    Vile stuff. I remember my Nan cooking it, and I'd gawk at the first whiff of it.

    Interresting article by Jim Kemmy about it ...

    http://www.limerickcity.ie/media/treacy's packet and tripe.pdf
    ... the much coveted nuns' belly...
    For the over the hill and the past-it, nothing is impossible.

  10. #8
    Munster Praetorian Guard treatycity1's Avatar
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    Love it, one of the things I love having when I get home.
    EB: \"It is said, Percy, that civilised man seeks out good and intelligent company, so by learned discourse he may rise above the savage and be closer to God\"
    Percy: \"Yes, I\'ve heard that\"
    EB: \"Personally, however, I like to start the day with a total dickhead, to remind me I\'m best\"

  11. #9
    Love it. Thanks for the Jim Kemmy article above. It tells you nearly everything you need to know about it. Ideal Saturday afternoon fodder to get you ready and in the right frame of mind for a match and a feed of pints.

    Can't be got in many butchers in town anymore and has to be cooked in milk and onions (by someone who knows what they're doing - it's always been my mother or grandmother who cooked it in our house) so it's almost a delicacy these days. Eaten with bread and loads of butter.

    Is it called Drisheen in Cork?

  12. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by buster View Post
    Love it. Thanks for the Jim Kemmy article above. It tells you nearly everything you need to know about it. Ideal Saturday afternoon fodder to get you ready and in the right frame of mind for a match and a feed of pints.

    Can't be got in many butchers in town anymore and has to be cooked in milk and onions (by someone who knows what they're doing - it's always been my mother or grandmother who cooked it in our house) so it's almost a delicacy these days. Eaten with bread and loads of butter.

    Is it called Drisheen in Cork?
    No drisheen is a blood pudding (smooth unlike black/white) eaten with tripe (which is vile)


    Skirts n Kidneys - now theres a Cork dish (i think - never heard of it outside the county) - fantastic stuff
    "I've got lots of potatos that need peeling and manure that needs shovelling" -M. Burns

  13. #11
    Munster Dog of War
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    Sep 2007
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    I cooked packet and tripe many a time for the rest of the family,never actually
    ate it .I was brought up on skirts n kidneys and eyebones and breast bones.

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